PDA

View Full Version : Almost in tears...


madhttr
10-04-2007, 08:46 PM
I have loved photography since I was in high school. I took photo all 4 years and wanted to continue but got married at an early age and never got around to learning more. Mind you this was before digital and now with so many cameras out I am in a sea of confusion.

I want to buy a DSLR and have been going back and forth between a Canon 30D or a Nikon 40X. I have heard that for the amature or new to DSLR the Nikon is best because it is easy to learn from.

The other issue I have is that I cannot remember anything I learned in high school. Aperature, f... what!, and all the other mumbo jumbo about a cameras settings. I want to find a website, or someone willing to teach me the ins and outs of photography without it costing me an arm and a leg. I don't want to be a professional, I just want to take pictures of family, friends, and our 2 fur kids without the pictures looking "amature". I love the way "soft" pictures look and pictures that are crisp, without a lot of noise.

A lot of information I know, but if someone can help guide me, I would be completely appreciative for the rest of my life!!

Nikel
10-04-2007, 09:01 PM
RE: canon vs nikon - my advice would be to get to a store and hold and play with both and see which feels more natural to you. There's going to be a learning curve for you with either.

Get Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson. It's a great book for learning the basics.

AndrewWG
10-04-2007, 09:25 PM
I have loved photography since I was in high school. I took photo all 4 years and wanted to continue but got married at an early age and never got around to learning more. Mind you this was before digital and now with so many cameras out I am in a sea of confusion.

I want to buy a DSLR and have been going back and forth between a Canon 30D or a Nikon 40X. I have heard that for the amature or new to DSLR the Nikon is best because it is easy to learn from.

The other issue I have is that I cannot remember anything I learned in high school. Aperature, f... what!, and all the other mumbo jumbo about a cameras settings. I want to find a website, or someone willing to teach me the ins and outs of photography without it costing me an arm and a leg. I don't want to be a professional, I just want to take pictures of family, friends, and our 2 fur kids without the pictures looking "amature". I love the way "soft" pictures look and pictures that are crisp, without a lot of noise.

A lot of information I know, but if someone can help guide me, I would be completely appreciative for the rest of my life!!

First off, dry the tears because you have come to a great place for help.

I fully agree with the Bryan Peterson book. It is great for learning again. I had the same problem as you when it came to that.

As far as the camera is concerned, if I had the choice between a 30D and a 40x, I would almost always go with the 30D. Not because it is Canon (I love Canon's) but because it is just a superior camera to the 40x. Now, if I had the choice between a Nikon D80 or a 30D or another of the better Nikon's, that would be a toss up. I just think the 40x is way too limited by not having a focus motor. That alone would be the deal breaker for me.

You should also look into the Canon XTi (or XT if you can find one) as it is a great camera and it's price is dropping a bit nowadays. The same holds true for the Nikon D50 (again if you can find one). They are all great cameras (with the exception of the 40x in my opinion) and since you only mentioned Canon and Nikon, I won't even get into the Pentax, Sony, Olympus etc models that are great as well. However, in my opinion, you should at least take a look at some of the Pentax cameras out there too. Great cameras with a great price and just as good photo quality.

Have I confused you enough yet? :scared1: I'm sure others will chime in too, but I guess if I were to answer your questions as you asked them, the short & sweet answers would be get the Canon 30D and grab a copy of Bryan Peterson's Understanding Exposure to teach you all the ins and outs of f-stops, shutter speeds, etc..

mvazul
10-04-2007, 09:26 PM
I have to agree with the previous poster. Go to a store, ask to see the two your are trying todecide between and see which feels more natural in your hands. That's what I did last year when I went from a 35mm Minolta.

I was torn between a Canon and Nikon. Nikon felt better in my hands so I went with the D50. Also, the dials, buttons, etc, were in a similar location as my Minolta. Plus, the Nikon was more than $100 less than the Canon.

As far as learning the settings, etc, the best way to learn is to get a camera and just start shooting. Change your settings and jot them down in a notebook to keep track of what you're doing. Also, my Nikon - and I know my friend's Canon - automatically record the settings for you. Comes in handy sometimes. Go to the library and take out some books on photography. I am still learning, but I have found actual practice is what is making me better.

Hope this helps!

Michelle :flower3:

Colleen27
10-04-2007, 09:37 PM
The other issue I have is that I cannot remember anything I learned in high school. Aperature, f... what!, and all the other mumbo jumbo about a cameras settings. I want to find a website, or someone willing to teach me the ins and outs of photography without it costing me an arm and a leg. I don't want to be a professional, I just want to take pictures of family, friends, and our 2 fur kids without the pictures looking "amature". I love the way "soft" pictures look and pictures that are crisp, without a lot of noise.

A lot of information I know, but if someone can help guide me, I would be completely appreciative for the rest of my life!!

I'm right there with you. I loved photography in high school and my first go-round at college, and had a Minolta 35mm SLR, but I went digital when I had DS because it was so freeing to snap-snap-snap and only keep the good ones. I cannot believe how much I've forgotten in 10 years of only using point-and-shoot digitals!

I picked up a Sony Alpha a couple weeks ago, and I'm just playing around with it to try to jog my memory. The user guide that came with the camera was remarkably helpful in reminding me which setting is used for what, and I've been reading this board and the links that get posted, and just experimenting. One day soon, I'll have to head out to the library and pick up a couple good how-to books, because I want to have everything down pat before we head off to Disney in January.

YEKCIM
10-04-2007, 10:12 PM
Since your decision is not influenced by existing lenses, etc, you can take an objective approach to your purchase, which is a good position to be in. I would suggest you look at your choice more in terms of the *system* offered by the competing brands than in a specific camera body. Look at the lenses offered by the manufacturers, especially, in the context of the kinds of shooting situations you expect to encounter. One manufacturer may have a particular lens that fits your needs more than the others, for example. You may even want to work backwards by first narrowing your lens choices down, then seeing which manufacturer has the best "fit" for your needs. Choose a body that complements those lenses, your budget, and other considerations, and don't get too hung up on megapixels.

~YEKCIM

Gdad
10-04-2007, 10:20 PM
No need for tears- I think a lot of people are in or have been in a similar situation. I loved photography in High School- took classes- was involved in photography groups- etc. Used a Canon AE1. Then with kids- life- and the introduction of digital P&S cameras I got lazy and pretty much forgot everything I knew. Rest assured it comes back quickly and is much fun practicing anyway.

I'm sure lots of people can recommend some good reading material- either books or online to get started back on the road to understanding. Good thing is- I think all the consumer dslr's have Auto Modes not too far removed from a P&S type camera for requirements in understanding the camera settings. That way you can start using your new camera immediately with good results and take on relearning a few things at your own pace.

As for your purchase- as was stated I don't think the 30D and the D40 are on par for comparrison. Not sure exactly- I know Canon and Nikon models kind of stagger but you might be better off comparing it to the D80- which is what I have now. The best advice is to hold and try the products yourself and choose what feels best to you. Trust me when I say they all take fine pictures and will thrill you once you dive back in.

Good luck and keep us posted!

madhttr
10-05-2007, 12:05 AM
Thanks everyone for your advise. I have held the Canon, it seemed a little complicated. I have 2 cameras right now both p&s cameras. A Kodak DX7590 and a Canon Powershot SD630. I have taken a few pics that I really like with the Canon (see below). I have never really gotten the hang of the Kodak - I hate the indoor pictures it takes and outdoor pictures are what I was talking about when I said "amature". I will look into the Nikon D50 and the Canon XTi. Hopefully soon I can get back into the "sport".

Thanks Again!

Universal Studios "Waterworld"
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v690/liiiina76/IMG_0437.jpg

DCA "Hollywood Tower of Terror"
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v690/liiiina76/IMG_0561.jpg

DL Toon Town Minnie Mouse
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v690/liiiina76/IMG_0715-1.jpg

DL Toon Town Minnie Mouse
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v690/liiiina76/IMG_0718-1.jpg

DCA Boardwalk at night
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v690/liiiina76/IMG_0768.jpg

YEKCIM
10-05-2007, 04:50 AM
I will look into the Nikon D50 and the Canon XTi.

The D50 is a very good camera; I have two and am very happy with them. Keep in mind, though, that the D50 has been out of production for almost a year now, so it's safe to say that you will not be able to find a new one. Try eBay or maybe looked for a refurb at some of the online retailers.

Good luck!

~Y

Gdad
10-05-2007, 05:07 AM
You can still get a factory refurbished D50 (http://www.adorama.com/INKD50R.html?searchinfo=d50&item_no=3) for $400. ;) I bought a FR D50 from Adorama and you absolutely could not tell it from new.

YEKCIM
10-05-2007, 05:34 AM
Just found another good online D50 refurb source: $389 from Beach Camera (http://www.beachcamera.com/shop/product.aspx?sku=NKD50RB). They are a top-tier retailer, too.

~Y

jann1033
10-05-2007, 09:35 AM
as far as the aperture etc, it'll come back to you. i can't remember my phone number 1/2 the time but slowly photo stuff i knew yrs ago is coming back...the aforementioned book is a good one and i like to pick up so photo mags as well( the few i find the most useful are from the uk, i think one is popular photo( not the US pop photo), digital camera and the other has a cd that comes with it with techniques, digital photo...anyway my barnes and noble has them. as far as the body goes, agree with all the above...but would also go with a non entry model if you can afford it...if you have experience, especially since you have used digital cameras( i hadn't), you'll pick it up soon enough and then just want to upgrade( at least that is where i am presently at and i've only had my dslr for under 1 1/2 yr)

Groucho
10-05-2007, 11:25 AM
My wife is in the same boat - she loved photography in college (which wasn't that long ago for her!) using an almost full-manual camera, and has completely forgotten everything. She occasionally picks up one of the DSLRs, and had plans on using one when we were in CA recently, but rarely actually takes a shot with one.

Like the others said, 30D vs 40x is almost apples and oranges - especially as the 30D costs around twice as much!

Don't forget the other brands, they offer attractive systems for great prices, often with features not found on the "big two" (specifically image stabilization with every lens.) There's the Pentax K100D and K10D, Sony A100, and Olympus has a couple models, but only their newest top-of-the-line has IS.

seashoreCM
10-06-2007, 10:36 AM
What camera do you have now? If it has a variety of adjustments and you just keep on using it while learning (or re-learning) about f/stops, focal lengths, and the like, you can regain experience to better choose your next camera.

Most of the numbers, including the ISO (aka ASA) work the same for digital cameras as for film cameras. Because the lenses and focal lengths for digital cameras are smaller in an absolute sense, 35mm film camera equivalents are usually published and these equivalent numbers work the same way as for film cameras.

Digital camera hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/digicam.htm

handicap18
10-06-2007, 03:41 PM
Here's my story. I took photography class in high school for 3 years. I've had my own camera for 25+ years (many different models over the years). I've owned SLR camera's since the late 80's and for about 20 years I really only used them as glorious point and shoot cameras. Granted the image quality was much much better, but over the years I had completely gotten away and forgot just about everything I learned in HS Photo class (Mr Netto would be so dissapointed in me).

Anyway. Since I started coming here almost 2 years ago (wow time files) I have gotten back into "Photography". Most everything has come back to me now. Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure" has been a HUGE help along with the great folks here on the Dis Photo Board.

This board is a GREAT resource for help and inspiration and also for helping you spend your own money :rolleyes1 . Stick around here for a while, ask question, read responses, participate in the Photo Assignments and Show Me threads and some of the stuff you forgot will start to come back to you.

As far as equipment. The best recommendations is going to be your own hands. Find a place that sells more than a few models (preferable a local Camera store like Ritz or Wolf or a locally owned shops), hold the camera in your hands. Take some pictures with them. Switch lenses. Find all the dials. See which one feels comfortable to you. Then go home research a few of them for reviews and prices. Then make your decision. You never know what you'll end up with. More than a few people end up suprising themselves with their final decision.