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View Full Version : Camera help please.digital


mommytobug
10-01-2007, 12:34 PM
I have an Olympus SP 500 but cant seem to figure out how to take great pics. I ordered a used Kodak easyshare ls753 and it is not as good as the one I borrowed (may it is me that is no good). We have a trip in a month. I want a camera that will notbreak me, is easy to download, and will take great pics. DO you all have any suggestions. I never even see Kodak mentioned when i do visit here. PEASE HELP! My trip will mean nothing without pics.

LPZ_Stitch!
10-01-2007, 01:29 PM
It would help if you could post a few pictures you don't think are coming out very well, and the settings you used.

The Oly SP-500 should be a very capable camera, and IMO should perform better than a Kodak Easyshare (http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympussp500uz/page10.asp) and should have *much* less noise (http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/OlympusSP500UZ/page7.asp)....

Personally, if you like a 'superzoom' or 'bridge' camera, I don't think you could go wrong with a Canon S3/S5 ;) ... but, you really should be able to get good pictures from your existing camera. A month is plenty of time to learn the ins and outs of your camera, and how to get the best pics from it....

mommytobug
10-01-2007, 02:07 PM
I really do think I am the problem. The SP500 does excellent at the beach. It is the inside, lower light pics that dont come out. The pic below was taken with the Olympus. The only thing I hate is that it is bulky. I also have a regular 35mm olympus that is smaller I could take. I just hate not being able to immediately see my pic. :confused3 :confused3

LPZ_Stitch!
10-01-2007, 02:14 PM
I really do think I am the problem. The SP500 does excellent at the beach. It is the inside, lower light pics that dont come out. The pic below was taken with the Olympus. The only thing I hate is that it is bulky. I also have a regular 35mm olympus that is smaller I could take. I just hate not being able to immediately see my pic. :confused3 :confused3

Sorry, I don't see a picture.

However, low-light is the area where almost every P&S-type camera struggles (the large-sensor Fuji's are the exception), and where knowing how to control the camera settings to get the best possible results for your camera really come in handy.

Mostly, you need to know how to control the exposure -- the aperture, the shutter speed and the ISO -- to get the most out of any camera; whether it's a DSLR or an advanced P&S. Here's a great website for learning about exposure and manual settings: www.GoingManual.com :thumbsup2