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newholidayx2
09-07-2007, 06:29 AM
if not reisling what wine is similar

Robert P
09-07-2007, 08:44 AM
Germany's wine shop has several nice reislings, and usually at least 1 (maybe more) available in their tasting sampler.
Don't know if France has them or not. Have never really hit France up for wine (yet).

jenelope
09-07-2007, 10:12 AM
I believe France does have some Rieslings, too. Riesling is produced in the Alsace region, as well as in Germany. I think they had it at the French F&W booth last year. Gewurtzraminer is also produced in Alsace and it's very tasty. Definitely give vouvray a try if you like riesling. It's got a similar tangy sweetness to it, but the sweetness varies by year and soil. Just remember "sec" means dry.

I take it you tried the riesling in your quest to become a wine drinker? I have to say, I'm impressed with the questions you've been asking and your plans for the F&W Festival. I always think the best traits to have in trying something new are curiosity and a willingness to just jump in.

Horace Horsecollar
09-07-2007, 10:36 AM
Pierre Sparr Riesling is very good. It's not as sweet as most German Riesling, but it's not as dry as most Australian Riesling.

If I recall correctly, the wine shop in France sells bottles of Pierre Sparr Riesling. It was also sold by the glass at the Food & Wine Festival booth in France last year.

I don't think Chefs de France and Bistro de Paris have Pierre Sparr Riesling on their wine lists, but I could be mistaken.

I agree that if you like Riesling, you should also try Gewürztraminer. The Alsace region of France produces great Gewürztraminer.

Locomigo
09-07-2007, 10:44 AM
Pierre Sparr Riesling is very good. It's not as sweet as most German Riesling, but it's not as dry as most Australian Riesling.

If I recall correctly, the wine shop in France sells bottles of Pierre Sparr Riesling. It was also sold by the glass at the Food & Wine Festival booth in France last year.

I don't think Chefs de France and Bistro de Paris have Pierre Sparr Riesling on their wine lists, but I could be mistaken.

I agree that if you like Riesling, you should also try Gewürztraminer. The Alsace region of France produces great Gewürztraminer.

My DW loves both of these types of wine, and also enjoys a nice Pinot Grigio. Might we find any of that @ FWF?

newholidayx2
09-07-2007, 10:56 AM
I take it you tried the riesling in your quest to become a wine drinker? I have to say, I'm impressed with the questions you've been asking and your plans for the F&W Festival. I always think the best traits to have in trying something new are curiosity and a willingness to just jump in.

thank you
Yes Ive been trying different wines. Like the wines with no aftertaste. White zin I found good, just like riesling. Pinot Grigio is ok but does have an aftertaste. And Chardonnay well what do I do with the bottle now? there's no way I'll be finishing it!
I figure if Im spending my actual 50th birthday day drinking champagne and wine I want it to be good wine!

thanks everyone

malibuconlee
09-07-2007, 03:43 PM
A Spatlese is very similiar to a Reisling, to me ti seems to have less of a bite or aftertaste. I sometimes find a German Spatlese/Reisling wine at one of the local shops. They've been out for a long time. Apparently they only buy it from them their distributor when it's on sale.

Horace Horsecollar
09-07-2007, 04:02 PM
A Spatlese is very similiar to a Reisling, to me ti seems to have less of a bite or aftertaste. I sometimes find a German Spatlese/Reisling wine at one of the local shops. They've been out for a long time. Apparently they only buy it from them their distributor when it's on sale.

"Spätlese" is one of the ripeness terms in the official German wine classification system.

"Spätlese" simply means "late harvest" (grapes picked about a week after normal harvest). Most Spätlese wine is Riesling or a blend that includes the Riesling grape.

If you see a German wine labeled with "Classic," it means the same as "Spätlese." The Germans are beginning to use terms that mean more to customers outside of Germany. Along the same lines, you'll now often see "dry" instead of "trocken" on German wines that are not sweet.

webray
09-07-2007, 04:23 PM
My DW loves both of these types of wine, and also enjoys a nice Pinot Grigio. Might we find any of that @ FWF?

You probably will be able to find a nice Pino Grigio..and many many other things. so many wines, so little time, lol. Enjoy!

malibuconlee
09-07-2007, 04:30 PM
"Spätlese" is one of the ripeness terms in the official German wine classification system.

"Spätlese" simply means "late harvest" (grapes picked about a week after normal harvest). Most Spätlese wine is Riesling or a blend that includes the Riesling grape.

If you see a German wine labeled with "Classic," it means the same as "Spätlese." The Germans are beginning to use terms that mean more to customers outside of Germany. Along the same lines, you'll now often see "dry" instead of "trocken" on German wines that are not sweet.

Thanks, I was once told it was made from a different grape than the Riesling.

ImprovGal
09-07-2007, 10:43 PM
thank you
Yes Ive been trying different wines. Like the wines with no aftertaste. White zin I found good, just like riesling. Pinot Grigio is ok but does have an aftertaste. And Chardonnay well what do I do with the bottle now? there's no way I'll be finishing it!
I figure if Im spending my actual 50th birthday day drinking champagne and wine I want it to be good wine!
thanks everyone

Instead of investing in entire bottles of wine to try, why not take advantage of the smaller pours at the festival to try a bunch of different wines during the day for your 50th birthday? Then, when you find one you like, buy a bottle and have a nice celebration that night?

marlynnp
09-07-2007, 10:59 PM
And Chardonnay well what do I do with the bottle now? there's no way I'll be finishing it!


Use it for cooking!

Horace Horsecollar
09-08-2007, 12:32 AM
Thanks, I was once told it was made from a different grape than the Riesling.
That particular Spätlese may have been made from a different grape.

The key point is that the Germans have terms for ripeness and picking methods, which are independent of the grape variety:

Spätlese (late harvest)
Auslese (select picking)
Beerenauslese (berries select picking)
Trockenbeerenauslese (dry berries select picking)
Eiswein (harvested and pressed after frozen on vine)

It's all a bit complicated, and it doesn't help the German wine industry that these terms are initially meaningless to people who don't speak German.

However, German wines can be great for people who are just discovering wines (and for experienced wine drinkers too). In fact, I would bet that 75% of American adults would prefer a typical German Riesling over a typical oak-aged California Chardonnay. But they order Chardonnay in restaurants because that's what they think sophisticated adults are supposed to do.

I still like Rieslings a lot. The grape has a terrific taste. But I now buy dry Australian Rieslings, although I've had excellent dry ("trocken") German Rieslings too.

newholidayx2
09-08-2007, 06:15 AM
Instead of investing in entire bottles of wine to try, why not take advantage of the smaller pours at the festival to try a bunch of different wines during the day for your 50th birthday? Then, when you find one you like, buy a bottle and have a nice celebration that night?

The festival ends 2 days before my 50th. I will be sampling around the countries during the last F&W festival weekend however. I'll most likely buy a bottle and keep in my BCV fridge till that Tues- thanks

Im going to a wine sampling today

bearzabout
09-08-2007, 08:26 AM
Make sure to try a glass of the sparkling red at the Italian pavilion. It is Banfi Rosa Regale and is very popular. It is best combined with dark chocolate.