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saymama
02-18-2001, 02:13 PM
I just made reservations. I asked the lady about the pass and was told to go to City hall, unlike before when I was told that I could do it over the phone. She said that I would need a drs note (read here that I didn't-but had already gotten one in case). I asked her if we were all allowed to stay with my son because there's a total of 6 people with tickets and them my 1 yr old. I am assuming that he can be included with us since he's an infant even though that would bring our party up to 7. She told me that not everyone in the party was allowed to wait with him. ONe person only and that depending on the ride, I would be allowed to wait at the exit or in the gift shop until my party came up in the regular line. This seems a bit strange to me. Haunted mansion for instance does not have a gift shop attached to the ride, and how will I find my party if I am at the exit on the other side of the building.

This is a vacation, and yes it's Disney where people try to cheat the system. (we will be using fastpass whereever available to cut down on using the pass) But my son has autism. And we want to have a good time too. I don't want my party to split up. It would just as hard on him to try to sit on a bench or walk around a gift shop as it would for him to wait in a crowded and noisy line.

Am I being too picky? I just thought that what she told me conflicted with what I heard. Can someone set me straight or give me a better outlook/attitude on this?

thank

teri
02-18-2001, 02:35 PM
As is often the case, the person on the phone didn't know what she was talking about. :rolleyes:

I understood it to be a total of 5 people per GAC, but I may be wrong. You stay together, and you enter together, and you leave together. Sometimes you use an alternate entrance, other times you use the regular FastPass line. It depends on the attraction.

Wait in the gift shop, indeed! ha! Yeah, right, great place for an autistic kid to wait... it is almost laughable. Thank goodness we have a sense of humor. ;)

I recommend taking radios anyway, so that you can be flexible and meet up if you do have to split up. You will be OK.

http://www.wdwinfo.com/sites/family/galc.gif
"My brain takes a vacation just to give my heart more room..."
teri@iluvdisney.com

SueM in MN
02-18-2001, 04:11 PM
I agree with teri. That woman did not know what she is talking about. What she told you was actually written in the Guidebook for Guests with Disabilities up until a couple of years ago, BUT it never worked like that.
You will go to Guest Services at the first park you enter (in City Hall in MK) and tell them what your problem is. I have heard of people taking a Dr. note with them, but I have never heard of anyone having to show one to get a Guest Assistance Card. You will be asked to use fastpass as much as possible. They ask you to limit the number of people accompanying the person with the card in line to 5, but from our experience, if you have, for example 6 in your party, they won't make the party split up.

SueM in MN
Co-Moderator of disABILITIES (http://wdwinfo.infopop.net/OpenTopic/page?q=Y&a=frm&s=40009993&f=38009194)

Safari Steve
02-20-2001, 10:18 PM
If your card is for a shaded waiting area, a seated waiting area, or the like, two of your party will wait at one of our benches until the rest of your party gets under the canopy. From there it is only a five minute wait with shade and fans, and you will all enter through the main entrance.
If your card says you may use the wheelchair entrance, you may use an alternate entrance, or you may use a stroller for a wheelchair, and there are six or less in you party (a one year old won't tip the scale) you will use the Fastpass entrance. If there are more than six, you will be asked to use Fastpass. If all FPs have been distributed for the day, or if you currently hold a FP, don't worry, we will help.
That is just the procedure for Mansion, there are slight differences at some attractions, but the basic guidelines apply everywhere.
The biggest piece of advice I can give you is to just relax (I know, it's hard, but try). We have to be nice to you. We want to be nice to you. But you should be nice to us too. (That is advice offered to ALL guests... Please don't think I'm accusing guests with wheelchairs/disabilities rude... lots of people are rude, but the folks who need special assistance generally are not.)
Good luck and have fun!
:):):)

Flamingoes get their pink coloration from the shrimp that they eat. Shrimp are pink because, of course, they eat flamingoes.

lisapooh
02-21-2001, 09:05 AM
Steve,
Why is the fastpass for the handicapped using it so inconsistant and in some ways unfair? On some rides, such as HM castmembers are very nice and helpful. On Pooh they are sometimes downright nasty. It really bothers me that in some cases I am forced to use fastpass because the stand-by line is not accessible and because of that I end up missing shows or parades I would like to see. Except for being in a power wheelchair , there is no reason why I can't use a standby line if I want as long as it is accessible.
An example of the treatment I get at Pooh. I've been told I must use the fastpass. I've been told I MUST transfer from my ECV (note I was using a power wheelchair) I had no one with me to push a manual chair. Too bad you can't ride the ride. Now once I am at the ride I can transfer to a standard ride vehicle but I can't stand in line or push a manual chair. (if I could I'd have a manual chair). I am beginning to think that the CMs at Pooh have no idea what a power chair is,
And to one who owns and uses what Disney calls an ECV, it is not a convenience but a electric mobility vehicle and many of us resent the use of the name Electric convenience vehicle. Also a power wheelchair is a wheelchair even if it looks spiffy and nice.

Pooh Bear

saymama
02-21-2001, 09:49 AM
thanks for the response. i understand that there are different passes and different circumstances for each pass. My son has a rare form of autism called hyperlexia. Aside from some odd behaviors, he looks perfectly normal. We have what alot of people call an ivisible disability. But he can't talk and has really odd behaviors. He's 4 yrs old and taught himself to read 2 yrs ago. If he sees words or letters on a building, he's gone. I'm terribly afraid that if he gets away from us, I will have problems jumping out of line to catch him. Like most autistic children, he does not like loud, crowded places. If he hears another child crying (including his brother) he will have a tantrum. How much fun do you think that will be for everyone in line? A separate place to wait in line seems the best solution (aside from those rides that we will use fastpass, or choose to not bring him on). I have heard that there are places like this that we can wait. I'm not asking to jump ahead of the line, but I do know that he does not comprehend waiting. And even if I could make him stand there, he'd be all over the place. Try to get an autistic kid to sit still for 2 seconds much less 2 mins, is a feat in itself. I can totally understand that you guys are trying to be nice, but you must understand that so am I. I do know that I will probably cry if someone gives me a hard time. It's so hard for someone who has not dealt with autism to understand the idosyncrisies of a person that has this condition. Their brains are wired differently and what seems logical and easy to you, is difficult and painful to my son. His idea of fun is running back and forth. To me is seems logical that this child can not wait in a 30-45 min line. I would have to say that 15 min would be extreme to him.

Maybe Disney should starting having disability awareness classes for their cast members. Even a pamphlet to read would increase understanding a little bit.

So, if you run into a mom with a 4 yr old autistic child (who is adorable) and she's crying, that's probably me. Let's just hope that it doesn't come to that and no one gives me a hard time and questions me.

Funny thing is, my 18 mos old seems to have the same condition. So actually, we will have 2 kids with invisible disabilities.

toni

Safari Steve
02-21-2001, 04:49 PM
1) The seperate waiting area is an option, I think. It works just like the shaded or seated area card.
2)Disability awareness and assistance is a large portion of Traditions, the first class that everyone who works at WDW must take before they can even continue training.
3)because of queue logistics, the FP entrance is the wheelchair entrance at Mansion. There are guidelines for that (which I outlined in the above post)that are followed for the safety, comfort, and convenience of all guests.
4)I'm sorry that I can't answer all of your questions. Guest relations knows alot more than I do on this subject. I wouldn't call being asked to use FastPass and (in limited and uncommon situations) being able to hold more than one fastpass at a time unfair to someone who needs special assistance. The cards help us to know how to help you in the best way possible, and sometimes that means unusual or slightly more time consuming methods. When you finish your visit, be sure to stop by Guest Relations and ask for a comment sheet. Tell us the good and not-so-good things that you experienced (please remember the good points).
Good Luck!

-Steve

Flamingoes get their pink coloration from the shrimp that they eat. Shrimp are pink because, of course, they eat flamingoes.

tammyh-oregon
02-21-2001, 06:10 PM
I think what people are alluding to with the fastpass being unfair is that on at least one ride that I know of, Test Track, the fast pass line is the accessible line. The standby line goes up the stairs. This means you are basically forced to use fastpass. This is unfair in that you must wait longer in some cases or miss out altogether. When we were in Epcot in September using a wheelchair we wanted to ride test track one last time. It was about noon and the fast passes were for about 3 hours away. We were headed to the Magic Kingdom for the evening. The standby line was only about 1/2 hour long. Is it fair that we are forced to wait 3 hours but others could get in line and wait 1/2 hour. Granted this is a limited situation but it happened. Luckily the fast pass person told us to just come back in 1/2 hour and he would let us up the fastpass line but what if it was someone who for what ever reason decided to follow the rules. We would have been out of luck because of using the wheelchair. Ok, one could say just blow off your plans at the Magic Kingdom. I would say why should I have to. As I have said many times, If the disabled complain about things like this we preceived as seeking special treatment when all we want is for Disney to take a look at what is happening from all angles. It will never be fair to everyone but it seems that the disabled are getting the backlash because of supposed ADA compliance.

Tammy

SueM in MN
02-21-2001, 06:27 PM
Thanks for trying to help us out, Safari Steve.
I think things have improved in the past year. We got a GAC for the first time last March. It's not that we didn't need one or that we didn't try to get one before that. It's that we were told that since our dd uses a wheelchair she could not get a GAC. This presented lots of problems for us because she has multiple handicaps including attention deficit disorder. She hit other people in line when they touched her wheelchair and when she had enough waiting, she just left the line. When we told CMs about our problems, some were very sympathetic. Some told us to use their names and talk to their supervisors or the CMs at Guest Services. When we did, we were told "tough. Come back when there isn't a line. We don't have GACs for people in wheelchairs." For several years, we went to the park, but went on few rides because we couldn't wait in the lines and there was no place else to wait.
Last March, we finally got someone who saw what difficulty we were having even keeping her in line to wait to talk to Guest Services. The GAC was what made our visit possible. We did use fastpass when we could, but it didn't always work out. Because of her physical problems and the fact that coming to WDW is a one hour time change for us, it's hard for us to get to the parks early in the day. Sometimes the fastpasses are gone for the day when we get there or are so far into the future that it's likely we won't be at the park at that time.
Being in line in a wheelchair is not easy. It's a lot like driving during rush hour in heavy traffic (which I do every work day). You have to stay fairly close to the people ahead of you, or someone will cut you off. If you get too close and they stop, you might hit them. Some other people in line are very nice. A few are downright nasty with looks, comments, hitting into the wheelchair and letting their kids play with the wheels or footrests. Some of the lines are difficult to manouver in because they are ramps or have many turns. It's a lot of work for us to come to WDW. many parents don't have sympathy for our problems because they see themselves having problems with a 2 or 3 year old child. The difference is that their child will be easier to bring to the park each time they come. Mine will be bigger and heavier and probably not a lot more patient than she is now. ã

SueM in MN
Co-Moderator of disABILITIES (http://wdwinfo.infopop.net/OpenTopic/page?q=Y&a=frm&s=40009993&f=38009194)

lisapooh
02-21-2001, 06:43 PM
I have to agree with you Tammy. The handicapped certainly are suffering from a backlash of ADA and the perception we are getting something special that the able bodied are not. Not having choices is one of these things.Test Track, Haunted Mansion, Peter Pan, and Jungle Boats all have inaccessible stand-by lines.
Pirates is just plain inaccessible if you don't have a companion to push a manual chair unless you are used to using a manual chair. I don't even try unless I have a companion.
Pooh, you get an attitude from some CM if you are using a nice power chair. Guess you need to be in some awkward looking contraption for them to believe you actually have a disability. They decide it is an ECV and demand you transfer to a manual chair. I keep telling them if I could push a manual chair I would be using one.
Except for not being able to use my legs well I am perfectly healthy and do not need or want a constant companion. I like my independence and I wish Disney CM would understand that using a power chair allows me to have my independence and it is not a stupid electric convenience vehicle. Whoever choose that name certainly has done a great disservice to the disabled who use them. It unfortunately seems defines the CM attitude towards those who use them.
BTW there is no reason why my power chair should not go through the line at Pooh and I was told by the supervisor I insisted on seeing that there was no reason. The reason I was hassled is that the CMs decided on seeing my power chair that it was an ECV, Why because it does not have the awkward look of many power chairs, It does not because at this point I do not need the swing away foot rests, versa seating and special equipment. I can sit in a comfortable seat without positioning and use a platform foot rest. In fact for my short height it is better, But I must have a one handed steering system which the controller provides and I can't walk more than a few feet without my cane or a grab bar or stand for a extended period without falling and extreme pain.
It is very fustrating for a disabled person who likes to be independent. And I am when I am not at Disney. I drive my own car, teach as a sub, and am a graduate student. I do not use a companion at all unless I want my husband or daughters along. All I want are the SAME choices an able body person recieves. If an able bodied person has a choice of stnadby or fastpass then I want the same. I don't want or like to be told tougn. You have no choice because you are disabled. You come back at your fast pass time to ride this ride even if it means you miss the parade. Too bad. Tough luck. And this is the attitude I have been getting lately. This was especially true at Christmas. I pay just as much for a vaction as the next guy and I want it to be just as magical and that doesn't mean missing things because access is not equal.

RANT OFF

[This message was edited by lisapooh on 02-21-01 at 10:08 PM.]

Safari Steve
02-21-2001, 09:28 PM
As far as having to transfer to a courtesy chair before boarding an attraction (Pirates is the only one that comes to mind right now), that has nothing to do with CMs having attitudes or people thinking you are getting special treatment.
At Pirates, the unloading area is in a different part of the building from the loading area. Consequently wheelchairs have to be folded and lifted into the back of the boat by the CM at load and lifted out and unfolded at unload. Becuase ECVs and power chairs are heavy and (for the most part) do not fold, they can't be put into the boats. There is also no way to get the ECV or power chair to be taken from load to unload (like at ToT). Unless you have a lightweight, folding chair, transferring to a courtesy chair is the only way to ride Pirates.
Rest assured, though, that no one is just trying to make your visit unbearable. Providing the courtesy chairs is a way to help as many people as possible experience the attraction.

Flamingoes get their pink coloration from the shrimp that they eat. Shrimp are pink because, of course, they eat flamingoes.

saymama
02-22-2001, 07:06 AM
Steve,

You truly are a wealth of info. Thanks for every bit of it. Although, I am not sure that you read my post correctly. I am very willing to use fast past on the rides that offer it, as that will eliminate me having to keep my son in a long standing line.

I am glad that you guys have to take a disabilites awareness class, or whatever you call it. There are very clear descriptions for what to do when you are using a wheelchair, or if you can't stand in the shade and whatnot. But what about my son's situation? A child who does not have the mental capicity to understand waiting, tantrums easily, and CAN NOT stand still, but yet looks perfectly normal. What do we do then? As I said in my original post, the lady at reservations told me that we'd have to wait at the exit or gift shop until my party reached the beginning of the line. May I just say, That's the stupidest thing that I've ever heard. How in the world am I supposed to know that they have reached the front of the line if I can't see them?

My thing is that, I feel as if people are questioning me. LIke I am trying to cheat the system. Trust me! I would trade my son's condition anyday to stand in line for an hour at disney world. But facts are, that won't happen.
Once I get the GAC, will I still be questioned when I get to the ride?

I haven't been to disney in a 5 yrs. So I am not sure how much the lines have changed, but one comes to mind. There is no way in the world that Blaize would have stood in line at Peter Pan.

I don't want to put you on the spot Steve. I did say that I would use the fast pass, and you went on about using fast pass and wheelchair. What I mean is, I gave details about my son and yet you still went on about other things that did not pertain to me. So, does this mean that others in the park will do the same. At the moment I am very emotional about dealing with both of my son's conditions and I already know that even having to ask for the card is gonna make me cry. The thought of having to use it does not make me happy. The thought of being given the third degree about having to have it, makes me less happy than the previous.

I am a worrier by nature and I am sure that things won't be so bad. But I am also a mother of 2 children with disablities. That makes me more than a mother. That makes me an advocate. Which means that unlike most mothers, I have to stand taller and talk louder to help my kids. I've learned not be ashamed of this position in my life and don't mind using it when pushed to.

Sorry if that all sounds rude. Must be the advocate in me!
:)

lisapooh
02-22-2001, 07:15 AM
Steve,
I had already stated that Pirates was impossible because of just that reason. There is no way of getting the power chair to the exit from the entrance other than a castmember going back through the entrance queue and taking it around to the exit via the elevator. Was too involved. That's the reason I only ride it if a family member is with me. Remember I wouldn't be using a power chair if I could actually push a manual. Rides I can't do at all or independently at MK are: Pirates, Tom Sawyer and the Treehouse. And I don't do Space Mountain, but I do Splash and Big Thunder Mountain.
Splash's line is a problem only if very long. People in power chairs and their own EMVs don't care to sit on the bridge and get wet due to potential damage to their electric control system.
Tried to explain that to a young castmember one day and he just didn't get it. I don't think Disney wants runaway guests in large heavy mobility vehicles and that is what happens when the controller gets wet. They should allow us to wait with one companion until our group gets past that dangerous area.

Pooh Bear

saymama
02-22-2001, 07:17 AM
STeve!!!! I reread your post and I'm sorry, you answered all the questioned and very politely. I read it really fast at first and mistook some for what you wrote! Sorry, see what I am! It's that mommy advocate thing. Of course I bet every mommy here has had thousands of those advocate moments. YOu know the ones that call for a slightly modified voice and you end up screaming at the wrong person. I witnessed this just this morning as a mom was dropping off her daughter in class. She yelled at someone who had nothing to do with the problem. She wasn't really yelling AT her, just yelling in annoyance about the situation.

Steve, I am sooooooooooooo sorry. You did a great job. Please don't hold it against me! I promise to seek you out once I get there and say so in person!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thanks so much for clearing everything up, even if it took me a moment to realize that you did so.

HoolyM
02-22-2001, 09:35 AM
Hi!
We just returned from WDW on Monday. My son is 6 and has Aspergers (a form of high functioning Autism). I was nervous about the trip and asking for a GAC. Thankfully I had no problem getting it but we ended up not using it at all on the trip.

We were fortunate that most of the lines were short & managable for us and when they weren't, fastpass timing happened to work out fine.
I will say the parks were unusually uncrowded and we got very lucky. If things had been busier I would have certainly needed to use it and there were are few times the wait was worse than I anticipated, by the time we did get on the ride I was kicking myself for not trying to use the card.

I got the card when I went to guest services at the front of Disney Studios while my husband & son waited outside.

I gave the cast member a big smile, asked how he was doing today and then said "I'm here with my son who's Autistic and I'd like to get a GAC" He asked what accomidations we needed, I told him to be able to use an alternate waiting area and to use the stroller as a wheelchair. He asked me to write down my son's name, the dates of our visit and how many in our party (6). He took that, went in back and returned a few minutes later with the card. The whole thing took about 5 minutes and I was very happy about how the CM handled it. He was very polite, I didn't have to prove anything or show any documentaion. I do think it helped that I went in with a friendly attitude & was able to clearly state what I needed & phrased my request in the right terms.

I hope that helps someone!
Holly

Safari Steve
02-22-2001, 07:38 PM
No harm done. I get that all the time (remember where I work?)
:):):)

BTW, the entrances at Splash Mountain have moved from their original location to near the WDW Railroad station to accomidate FastPass. I think that should help remove the risk of runaway ECVs.

Flamingoes get their pink coloration from the shrimp that they eat. Shrimp are pink because, of course, they eat flamingoes.

lisapooh
02-22-2001, 09:43 PM
Steve,
I don't care how many of Disney's ECVs are damaged. I care about those of us who own and use electric mobility vehicles such as power wheelchairs and scooters. I find the use of the term ECV in reference to our mobility equipment to be insulting and a trivialization of our needs, We do not use these pieces of equipment as a convenience and to infer this is not appreciated.

Pooh Bear

Safari Steve
02-23-2001, 06:56 PM
Especially not me. I think maybe there's been a little misunderstanding (maybe I'm misreading your posts) but you seem to be responding very defensively. My aim was to throw in some helpful information, and I find myself being painted as some insensitive soul. Perhaps I should have said "power chairs and ECVs won't risk damage in the queue for Splash Mountain."
Sorry.

Flamingoes get their pink coloration from the shrimp that they eat. Shrimp are pink because, of course, they eat flamingoes.

lisapooh
02-23-2001, 08:34 PM
Steve,
Not angry with you. You didn't decide to call them electric convenience vehicles. Some Disney brass did. It is just a term that many who use scooters and power chairs in their daily life really hate because of the attitudes it leads to.
The attitude is we use them as a mere convenience as the name inferes. They really need to emphasize to the castmembers in training that contrary to the name given to them by Disney, people who use them do not consider them a convenience but a mobility aid just as a cane, walker, manual chair, or braces.
Actually most of us would give our 1st born to be able to walk around Disney just like the rest of the able bodied world.
Actually I am looking forward to my next trip to WDW because it will be at a less busy time and we will be celebrating my oldest graduation from college. I'm actually in Orlando the week before for a conference at the Sheraton near SeaWorld.
Oh warning. Large group of deaf will be there April 19-21 for a conference and some will probaly stay over for some Disney time after. Practice up on your ASL.

Pooh Bear

Safari Steve
02-24-2001, 06:33 PM
I'll have my notepad and pen ready. I don't know ASL, but I have pretty good handwriting and find that that is the easiest way for me to speak to guests who have difficulty hearing. We also offer ASL interpreting at many attractions and shows on designated days each week. Additionally, you can get a guest assistance packet at rides with automated narration that contain type-written versions of the spiel and flashlights. Just another way we try to make visiting WDW more convenient for all of our guests.
:) :)

Flamingoes get their pink coloration from the shrimp that they eat. Shrimp are pink because, of course, they eat flamingoes.

lisapooh
02-24-2001, 09:02 PM
Note pad and pen work well if you don't use ASL. :)

Any advice for my daughter? She has a fear of being in crowded groups. Is fine if she can see her way out but panics in a group where she can't see a way out. She's an adult and has been leaving the parks when it gets too crowded. Misses her favorite rides a lot to. Fastpass is great for her but should she get a GAC? Most of her favorite rides have fastpass fortunately.

Pooh Bear

Safari Steve
02-25-2001, 09:01 AM
I don't think there's a GAC available for claustrophobia (sp?)... I can recommend doing the second parade, hanging out in Adventureland, and after Illuminations at Epcot, hang out in WS for about 15-20 minutes. The throng will be well into future world, and you can calmly stroll through WS, listen to the music, and watch the CMs closing up. It's really neat. That's all I can offer, sorry.

Flamingoes get their pink coloration from the shrimp that they eat. Shrimp are pink because, of course, they eat flamingoes.

Michelle NY
02-27-2001, 06:04 AM
Safari Steve
I just want to thank you for all of the info you took time to post When we are in WDW I can not wait to meet you in person. You are a truely caring guy. Thanks
P.s. maybe you could give a little training in caring to some of your fellow cast member esp. at the Pooh ride ;)

teri
02-27-2001, 12:44 PM
I have been holding off on replying to this thread... I have been distracted lately...

Safari Steve is a true friend to us here on the disABILITIES Board, and we appreciate his input and his patience.

The bottom line is this: despite the current level of effort and training of CMs at all the Disney parks and resorts, there is much more work to be done. We have been through this discussion before... the missing link is responsive, reciprocal communication between the CMs who are supposed to guide us to the proper entrances or accomodations and the guests with the various disabilities. No matter how much training they have gone through in Traditions, there are a significant number of CMs who still communicate an attitude of annoyance with those of us who must use the accomodations to make our vacations possible. We get conflicting information, and sometimes we get a very hostile response from the poorly trained CMs who see themselves as the guardians of the gate rather than the facilitators. This is something that I am sure Disney could improve, if they made it a priority.

Steve is NOT one of those CMs, and just like him there are hundreds of excellent, well-trained, sensitive, competent, caring CMs at the parks and resorts who are aware and do their best to do the right thing. We need more people like Steve to help us advocate for the easy changes that would make life better for the CMs and the guests.

I fully understand the need to vent frustrations... and I am very glad to see that everyone is working to get along. Sometimes we need to be careful not to push away the people who are in a position to help. Know what I mean? Lots of changes to be done, no one person can be expected to make it all happen.

We really do have to write that booklet, guys...

http://www.wdwinfo.com/sites/family/galc.gif
"My brain takes a vacation just to give my heart more room..."
teri@iluvdisney.com

teri
02-27-2001, 01:37 PM
lisapooh, the answer to your question is Yes, get a GAC if your child cannot tolerate crowds and will panic in the queue. That is exactly what it is used for. In that case, you will advocate to use the "alternate entrance in case of mainstream lines" option. :)

http://www.wdwinfo.com/sites/family/galc.gif
"My brain takes a vacation just to give my heart more room..."
teri@iluvdisney.com

lisapooh
02-27-2001, 01:56 PM
Even for an adult child? She is agoraphobic.

Pooh Bear

SueM in MN
02-27-2001, 02:25 PM
Agorophobic seems like a good reason to avoid the lines to me, no matter what age. WDW definately does not want someone getting upset in the lines. I can relate a little becasue I am claustrophobic and some of the lines mildly bother me when they are tight, dark and crowded. I can't imagine how much more it would bother someone with agoraphobia.
The way things are set up now, she is just getting a place to wait that will hopefully be more tolerable for her, not anything that anyone SHOULD complain about.
In her case, it might help if she can have something written about agoraphobia to take with her to Guest Services since most people are not familiar with it.
SueM in MN
Co-Moderator of disABILITIES (http://wdwinfo.infopop.net/OpenTopic/page?q=Y&a=frm&s=40009993&f=38009194)