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Laz
03-24-2001, 05:05 PM
Hi all! As some of you may have read on the other boards, I am taking some of my students to the National FBLA Conference held at the Dolphin. One of my students is an insulin dependent 18 year old and uses the pump. I took her for a weekend trip to Indy and she did fine. She is very good about monitoring, not afraid to do a prick check any time it is necessary. Her parents are considering whether to allow her to go for the 6 day trip. So they can make an informed decisions, I need your help. What should they worry about, if anything (for that matter, what should I worry about). What special needs can WDW provide? I know she can get a fridge in the room. What about rides and heat? I am going to discuss this with them next week, and I want to make sure they know all the facts. thanks for the help! PS....Hi Wheelsie :D :D

Wheelsie
03-24-2001, 06:19 PM
Hiya Laz ole buddy!! :) Congrats on going to that! Can I join you? LOL kidding...

Actually your on the right track with the fridge.... make sure you know where the first aid is located in each park if you go..in case your student has to have an emergency O J for sugars or needs to get out of the sun due to whatever... umm what else can I tell you...well when/if I think of more I will post it..

Oh and PS.....HIYA LAZ!!!! :D

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teri
03-24-2001, 08:59 PM
Unless the fridge already comes with the room, you will have to pay for one -- the old practice of giving free fridges for medical supplies has gone by the wayside.

We had a great thread about diabetes back in the fall... here is a link:
diabetes thread on disABILITIES Board (http://wdwinfo.infopop.net/OpenTopic/page?q=Y&a=tpc&s=40009993&f=38009194&m=181097022)

Be sure to check the new FAQ also, especially the practical tips sections - lots of info about beating the heat, getting a GAC if needed, etc. :)

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lisapooh
03-25-2001, 01:09 PM
Just a note. Insulin unless one is using Humalog does not need to be refrigerated but can be kept in an air conditioned room just fine. The hotel can refrigerate the spare insulin, There are packs made by FRIO which can hold spare insulin and keep it cool without refrigeration. Check on the web.
As far as going to a first aid station if she is hypo forget it. She should be carrying ready sugar with her and take that immediately and test to make sure it comes back up. Walking to the first aid station for help would lower the blood sugar even more.
Food should not be a problem as she should know what to avoid. Water and diet soda is available.
The will make a special meal at things like Hoop Dee Doo with 24 hours notice. At restaurants, she can just specify that they leave off sauces and glazes. They do this all the time.
She may need to adjust her basal rates for the increased exercise or eat a bit more and enjoy being able to eat things she normally would not like an ice cream bar.
FRIO WEBSITE (http://www.friouk.com)

Pooh Bear

Laz
03-25-2001, 01:53 PM
This is a fantastic board! Keep up the good work guys and gals! I think I will direct the parents to this thread. I think the biggest problem might be to get the other students to listen to her when she says she has to eat or rest or check her blood. Its usually not the ones with the physical challenge that cause the problems, its the people who don't understand the challenge. I have learned so much about diabetes from this young lady and her positive outlook on life is the best. Thanks all! ;)

Wheelsie
03-25-2001, 02:22 PM
thats what we're here for Laz ole buddy :)

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LindaDVC
03-25-2001, 02:25 PM
The toughtest days to regulate are the days we head to the water park. Since Hubbie does not swim he keeps the pump with him. I put an insulated cooler bag along with my tester on the back of his wheelchair. Since most diabetics don't have him following you around - you will have to decide where to keep the pump and tester while you enjoy the attractions. Personally I don't trust the minimed swim proof case.

I try to bolus some insulin every hour (adjust amount based on whether Ive been swimming vs
standing in line)

Being diabetic at disney is not much different except you will be on a different schedule and need to make adjustments with food and insulin! This skill needs to be learned for sick days, high exercise days, etc. Having people with her that know the basics and can get her help IF she ever needed it. Hope she has a wonderful trip!

Linda

ReneeQ
03-25-2001, 04:50 PM
Being on the insulin pump is wonderful! I cannot even compare my pre-pump Disney trips with my post-pump Disney trips. It is heaven. I have been on the pump for 10 years. If this girl is 18, she should have a thorough understanding of her diabetes and her pump and what to do.

Does she count carbohydrates? If so, then meals and snacks should be easy. She shouldn't have to order anything special or leave anything off.

BUT SHE MUST KEEP GLUCOSE TABLETS ON HER AT ALL TIMES. I cannot stress that enough! I have gone to Disney before with the cocky attitude that "if my blood sugars drops, there are snacks and cokes everywhere, I'll just grab something." Well, I learned the hard way. All the walking makes it hard to keep your blood sugar up. Insulin reactions can hit quickly and if you're stuck on a ride, in a line or in a show, you can't go grab a snack. If she has glucose tablets in her fanny pack or backpack, she should be fine.

She should check with her doctor about her basal and bolus rates before she goes. (If she's not comfortable figuring them herself - my doctor encourages his patients to micromanage their own care). I find when at Disney and doing all that walking I don't need to take the same number of units of insulin per grams of carbs as I do at home. Adjusting that accordingly will help to avoid the low blood sugars.

I do not know how long she has been diabetic. I have been diabetic 26 years. As far as the other students not wanting to stop when she does - how has she been around these kids in the past? All my friends, family, and my godchildren (ages 9 & 5) KNOW that if I say I need to stop, I'm not kidding. It is not negotiable. You just stop and they will have to stop, too. Now, I don't actually stop that much. EVERY time we take a bathroom break at Disney, I check my sugar. If I "feel" low, I eat a snack (from my backpack) as we're walking. Often when I really need to rest, we ride something slow, like Small World, the train, Tomorrowland Transit Authority, etc. Something you can get on pretty quick, but the kids still feel like they're doing something besides sitting on a park bench. I can check my sugar and eat right on the rides. I also keep a tiny flashlight in my backpack for checking my sugar inside dark rides.

The main things I would tell her are: Don't ignore how you feel, always have snacks, water and glucose tablets in your back pack, check your sugar at least once an hour, and wear comfortable shoes and pace yourself.

I am wondering why this girl's parents are aren't sure if they are going to let her go. Is she not under very good diabetic control? I have a 7 year old diabetic on a pump in my sunday school class and she knows the ins and outs of diabetes as well as I do. Her mother lets her go on trips with us all the time.

Let me know if I can answer any questions!

MaryT
03-26-2001, 04:12 PM
ReneeQ - you gave some great info! I don't have any first hand experience as far as having diabetes myself, but my mother has been diabetic for over 43 years. She's looking into the pump right now. The only thing I'd add for Laz is to know how to give a glucogon (sp?) injection. If the sugar drops low enough that the girl is unresponsive, it's the only way to get it back up. And I'll stress - she needs to CARRY sugar (glucose tablets, hard candies, or even sugar packets) with her at all times.

ReneeQ
03-26-2001, 07:52 PM
I'm not real big on Glucagon. I have never needed it in 26 years. (I know, never say never!). But being on the pump, you are only taking Regular insulin, usually Humalog. No NPH insulin is taken at all. The Humalog insulin kicks in almost immediately, peaks in about 30 minutes and is gone in about 2 hours. By not being on any NPH insulin, you don't have any long acting insulin kicking in later and staying in your system for 10-12 hours.

Now I do not know this student we are discussing, but what works for me is checking my blood sugar often (like I said, about once an hour while at Disney) and paying close attention to how I feel. If I need to stop and check my sugar, I stop. I usually go to Disney 2-3 times a year, and one of those trips is solo, so I have to stay on top of things, there is no one else to rely on.

Many people are freaked out over the thought of having to give someone else a shot, especially if they are "passed out." I have two young diabetics (one on the pump) I spend a lot of time with and we find the instant glucose in the tubes (sort of like a gel frosting) to work well. Should one of them be unresponsive it is easy to squeeze into their mouth.

mamajoan
03-27-2001, 11:31 AM
Hi guys, I have required glucagon injections on several occassions. My husband says the kit was easy to use( I have instructed everyone how to give the injection, even my "needle freaky" friends) Glucagon injections have saved me from that lovely ambulance ride to the ER. Being 18 and with a group of kids may limit one's sensibilities ( just don't want to feel like you are holding anyone back) so GLUCOSE TABLETS are a must, granola bars, water bottle, maybe even some Glucerna power bars. The biggest problem I had at WDW was the HEAT.. It sucks the energy and glucose right out of you. Being on a pump is fabulous, she can bolus and snack. Yippee! Epcot is a fabulous place for carb counting. Best of luck on your trip.

MaryT
03-27-2001, 05:06 PM
I almost forgot the most important thing of all - make sure the student has a Medic-Alert bracelet in case no one is with her and she needs help. My brother-in-law's brother almost died in the ER when no one was aware he was diabetic and thought he was just drunk (he was found slumped over the wheel at a stop sign by a cop) - he didn't want to wear the bracelet because it wasn't 'cool' (he was around 19 - 21 at the time). But now he wears a tag on a chain - all the time.

mamajoan
03-28-2001, 12:20 AM
MaryT,,,, Girl you are sooooo right!!!!!!Medic ID is so important. I am glad you can get them made in gold. Personally I hate the steel bracelet. Laz, if you are taking a cell/pager. give the girl the number on a card with emergency notification so she can keep it on her person. Just an idea.....

shmoogrrrl
03-28-2001, 11:07 AM
I just happened to come across this post, and I can't tell you all how happy I am to have found it! I was just recently diagnosed with Type II Diabetes, and was getting petrified by some of the things I've found on-line about traveling. Me, my husband, and another couple are planning a trip in August/September that will include a few days in Disney World and the 7-day Disney Cruise (My third DCL cruise!) The first site I found when searching for info on traveling with Diabetes said that you shouldn't do it unless you HAD to! I was flipping out!

Thanks to everyone who shared tips and tricks to surviving the "World" with diabetes! I'll definitely be printing this info out!

Kath

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MaryT
03-29-2001, 12:50 PM
shmoogrrrl - don't listen to anyone who says you 'shouldn't' do something due to your diabetes. Like I said, my mom's been diabetic for 43 years, and right now she's on a 2 week trip to Holland with my dad! She's had her ups and downs (I have experience with the glucogon injection), and so has her blood sugar! She finally wears her medic alert bracelet (yes, mamajoan, since they now come in gold, my mom does more than just carry a card!) - and carries glucose tablets and hard candy all the time. My mom's had diabetes my whole life, and I must say she's been a great role model for me as far as not letting things like that stop you from doing what you want to do.

lisapooh
03-29-2001, 01:28 PM
Whoever wrote that diabetics shouldn't travel has rocks in their head. I travel all over. I have had diabetes for 23 years. Good grief, are we supposed to curl up and die or something.
Go enjoy your trip. There's not much a diabetic can't do if they are in control of their blood sugars. My rheumatoid arthritis is more of a problem than the diabetes

Pooh Bear

shmoogrrrl
03-30-2001, 10:14 AM
Yeah, I figured that had to be insane. My grandfather traveled all the time!

I'm actually frustrated at the lack of information on-line for "newbie" diabetics. It seems to me that everyone has a different opinion oh how you should live as far as diet and activity goes, and I haven't been through my Insurance Company's Diabetic Education class yet. (I'm doing ths in two weeks). Hopefully I'll get more information then!

Thanks!

Kathy

http://adams.patriot.net/~kathy/ribbon.gif

lisapooh
03-30-2001, 01:31 PM
And your insurance company class will tell you a lot of good stuff and a lot of how nurses and doctors think they should control your life.
If you want to ask questions just email. I've has 23 years experience with diabetes. I also run a forum and chat on Delphi for people with diabetes. Feel free to come join us. I am not a doctor but can answer a lot of the practical things about living with this D-ragon

Pooh Bear

Wheelsie
03-31-2001, 09:18 PM
Laz let us know how things went...

and everyone one thank you for helping everyone out on this post :)

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Laz
04-01-2001, 03:26 PM
She will be going if we can raise the money! I showed her this thread and she will be watching for more info if anyone can think of some more.

SueM in MN
04-01-2001, 08:55 PM
A lot of really great info here. I wanted to mention that if she does need more care than she and her friends can provide, she doesn't have to go to First Aid, it will come to her. There are CMs all over the park that can communicate with first aid and get help sent quickly. That might help ease her parent's minds.s

SueM in MN
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Ninilchicken
04-03-2001, 06:23 PM
We went to WDW in Dec. I absolutely trust the swim case for my pump, went to Blizzard Beach with it, even after my DH accidently cracked the bracket that holds it shut. We had duct tape with us. You didn't say you planned on swimming, but you can hardly pass that up in Florida.

piratesmate
04-06-2001, 01:34 PM
...as I haven't been on this board for a while. I have been diabetic for 30 years and on the pump for about 15 (I'm on my third one.)

The one thing I didn't see mentioned in the posts was to make sure that someone other than the diabetic student knows how to put the pump on HOLD! My adrenal response is gone & my sugar is usually around 40 before I become symptomatic. At that point, I'm not thinking clearly enough to put the pump on hold while I grab something to eat. If the sugar is dropping rapidly, those couple of minutes can really make a difference.

I noticed someone mentioned Minimed's swimproof case - I'd never seen this one! I'll have to look it up, but why don't you trust it? I was thinking it might be good at least for rides where it might get wet?? Any thoughts? Last time, I carried zip lock baggies in my pump pouch (w/ all supplies for a complete setup change, test equip, candy, med card, etc.) I just took off the pump right before we got to the head of the line & put it in the bag. Between the exercise change, the heat & the sun, I never had difficulty with my sugar going too high because I turned off the pump for the length of a ride.

I would advise the student to check with her doctor about hourly boluses when swimming. I did this automatically for years before the doctor told me that it was unnecessary unless I was going to be without the pump for 4+ hours. He said that the swimming - even just standing around in the water - was enough to counteract the need for that period of time. Obviously, it is dependent upon the basal rate - so the advice will vary between individuals.

I have another question...why does Humalog need to be kept in the frig? My pharmacy told me that it can be kept out of the frig for up to 28 days. Did I miss something in the literature? :eek: <IMG SRC="/infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif" alt="confused"> :rolleyes: :eek:

lisapooh
04-06-2001, 02:09 PM
The literature recommends keeping humalog as cool as possible but not freezing. Under 86 degrees. The temperatures in Central Florida and south will start going into the 90s in May (maybe some in April) Therefore refrigeration is necesssary.
Users in Florida have found that from Mid-April to Mid October it is better to refrigerate Humalog than risk insulin that is not up to strength. I have had Humalog go bad in less than 10 days down here in the summer.
Literture or not, experience tells the tale.

Pooh Bear

piratesmate
04-06-2001, 06:25 PM
The last time we were at WDW I was using Velosulin, which kept fine in the air-conditioned room. I always carried enough for a full setup in my fanny pack, but used it up every other day & replaced. I'm glad for the first hand info! Being from PA, the doctor's don't mention this - & probably don't realize it.

I also read that there is a problem filling syringes in the air, due to air pressure problems. Does anyone know if this problem affects a pump? I would tend to think not, as it is a closed system, but...???