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View Full Version : Do/Did you make your own "baby food"?


cancer_survivor_06
03-15-2007, 08:34 PM
I use the term baby food for lack of a better word. I am also posting this b/c I figure this would be the best place to start.

My DD3 has Septo Optic Dysplasia (SOD) and along with her delays eating table food is one of them right now. I have been spending a fortune on baby food and I can't keep doing this especially since it is taping in to my disney fund. I don't want to puree or store food for months at a time a week is stretching it. I would also like to know have you ever just processed what you fix for dinner and feed to your dds or dss. Any help or suggestions at this point would be extremely helpful.

Thanks in advance.
Mandy

Starr W.
03-15-2007, 08:43 PM
My youngest hated baby food, once we introduced all the vegs,fruits and meats, I just started pureeing table food.

cancer_survivor_06
03-15-2007, 09:37 PM
Thanks for your response did you puree what u were fixing for every one else or did you select things. Also did u add anything.

I am sorry for all of the questions I am just worried about doing it for the first time.

famofsix
03-15-2007, 10:27 PM
I used the book mommy made...I got it from the library. The only veggies that were too weird were shelling peas and grean beans so I store bought those. The farmer's market is a great place for food if you have a local one and I used to freeze baby food in ice cube trays and pop them out into freezer bags. I had a small chopper and a hand mixer (the milkshake kind) for all the pureeing.

http://www.amazon.com/Mommy-Made-Daddy-Too-Revised/dp/0553380907/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-7348977-6118532?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174012913&sr=1-1

HTH

I saved loads of money and most of the time I just reserved the baby's food and ground it up at dinner time meals.:cutie:

AngieWin
03-15-2007, 10:40 PM
Check out SuperBaby Food from the library it gives great tips on making your own babyfood/pureed food. One of things that saved me time was making a big batch of pureed veggies and freezing them in ice cube trays. Then pop out the cubes and place them all in a freezer bag. Take a look at the different kinds of meals available in the 2nd/3rd stage foods and it should give you an idea of what works.

With veggies add some liquid (water it is cooked in works best) if it is too thick.

shovan
03-16-2007, 02:14 AM
Yes, I did. My DD did not have any issues except being lactose intolerant & could not handle most food colorings. These problems lasted until she was almost 9 yo old!

SueM in MN
03-17-2007, 05:28 PM
One of things that saved me time was making a big batch of pureed veggies and freezing them in ice cube trays. Then pop out the cubes and place them all in a freezer bag. Take a look at the different kinds of meals available in the 2nd/3rd stage foods and it should give you an idea of what works.

With veggies add some liquid (water it is cooked in works best) if it is too thick.
I did that with both my DDs, umpteen years ago when they were little. It seems like it would take a long time, but really doesn't take that long.

We also had a small food mill (similar to this that we used to grind up meals at mealtime. (http://www.onestepahead.com/catalog/product.jsp?productId=1182&parentCategoryId=85181&categoryId=85206)It worked well, but was messy and took a while to do.
If I was doing it now, I would buy one of these Magic Bullet things. (http://www.buythebullet.com/) They seem to do a good job (it's basically a little blender with the open end on the bottom and a closed top. The kits seem to come with a lot of little containers so you could blend up several portions at a time.
I had a small chopper and a hand mixer (the milkshake kind) for all the pureeing.
Actually the hand blenders (here's a link to one from Target that is the kind I think you are meaning) (http://www.target.com/gp/detail.html/sr=1-3/qid=1174168238/ref=sr_1_3/601-3033152-0212120?ie=UTF8&asin=B000GVSRY4) work well too.

SueM in MN
03-17-2007, 05:41 PM
Another place to try which might have information on making your own baby food is the University Extension Service in your state (this should be the one for MS). (http://msucares.com/)
When I was a Public Health Nurse, we found the Extension Home Economists to have a lot of helpful information like that. They may have recipes of foods that go together well.

cancer_survivor_06
03-17-2007, 06:13 PM
Thanks Sue for this help I have saved the MS link to my favorites so that I can read through it. Its funny that you mentioned the Magic Bullet b/c my dh was just saying he wanted to get one so I guess now he really has a reason. I was actually thinking about getting the food grindier that is at one step ahead I found one at kmart by munchkin for like 6.99 I just didn't know how well it would work and if it would even work on the food I fix for dinner.

cancer_survivor_06
03-17-2007, 06:53 PM
The only veggies that were too weird were shelling peas and grean beans so I store bought those.

Its funny that you mention this b/c the peas and meats are actually what I worry the most about. I have introduced to dd the the stage 3 baby foods other then gerber around here our winn dixie sell the beech nut brand and walmart sells the delmonte brand. One thing I have noticed about both is they have whole peas and since she doesn't chew they present a choking hazard. I have been feeding her these b/c the stage 2s are just puree and gerbers stage 3s might as well just be puree. With her just swallowing the pureed foods she is not getting full so since I started feeding her these stage 3s and she has been doing much better with her feedings and not always wanting more. This is the reason I thought about making my own baby food for her and then thought would it be okay to just put whatever I fix for dinner through the food processor for her. Would this be okay or would the recipes from these books be better.

SueM in MN
03-17-2007, 07:11 PM
This is the reason I thought about making my own baby food for her and then thought would it be okay to just put whatever I fix for dinner through the food processor for her. Would this be okay or would the recipes from these books be better.
In my experience, having the recipes gave people confidence to actually do it.
It's also helpful to have some recipes to use as 'models' and then you can go off on your own.

I found soft foods worked best with the food mill. Meat kind of gunked up in it and didn't grind well. Usually you need to add more liquid to meat to blend it because it has less moisture than vegetables and fruits.

3DisneyNUTS
03-17-2007, 07:26 PM
I made it for Chris and he is not a picky eater now. I bought the book recommended already Super BabyFood by Ruth Yaron. Is a must have. I found it so much easier than buying food and Chris could eat with us what we were eating. making your own also tastes aALOT better than jarred.

arminnie
03-17-2007, 08:47 PM
My family puts on the big trade show for the natural foods industry (think Whole Foods and all it's predecessors like Bread & Circus). I've know so many people (retailers and manufacturers) in that field for the past 30+ years.

Almost all of them made their own baby food. The wanted control over having organic natural ingredients in what was served to their kiddos.

I haven't personally done it, but I've watched it being made countless times. I think the main thing is not to put in items with a lot of salt and seasonings especially for a very young child.

Those little mini food processors are great. They really puree things up in a hurry and are fairly easy to clean.

quiltymom
03-20-2007, 12:01 PM
I made my own and was astonished at how easy it was! At the time we did it because food allergies run in our family and I wanted to keep the 5 main food allergins out of my kids' diets - plus I wanted to do organic.

Like many of the pp's, I just steamed bags of veggie, added water and pureed. I could then control the amount of solids that left in the pureed mass as they grew older. I did this with grains (quinoa works great!) and meat. I would then freeze them in ice cube trays, which made for easy portions. Then when we were ready to eat - or going somewhere - I'd just get out the foods in the amounts I wanted and then microwaved it. I even had some restaurants who offered to heat it for me.

It was amazing just how much $$ we saved doing this! Yet I always had a stash of baby foods in jars on the shelf for those last-minute needs.

As a funny aside, I purchased one of those earth-mother-type magazines from Whole Foods that had as their cover story, "Make your own baby food". So, I bought it and died when I read what to do. Basically, it said to just puree or food mill whatever you are having to eat that meal for your kid, leaving out what you don't want them to eat. Like I already didn't know that! :rotfl2:

I hope this helps!

arminnie
03-20-2007, 02:21 PM
earth-mother-type magazines from Whole Foods
Ever seen Delicious Living Magazine (previous named (Delicious!)? I was one of the founders of it many moons ago.

quiltymom
03-20-2007, 02:35 PM
Ever seen Delicious Living Magazine (previous named (Delicious!)? I was one of the founders of it many moons ago.

Nope - sorry.

the only magazines I nab at the stores these days are quilting, decorating or knitting mags! Can't get enough of them! :cloud9:

Momelie
03-30-2007, 04:28 PM
On the meats, when I was making my own baby food (youngest DD is 9 now), the meat department of Publix would always grind chicken and turkey cutlets for me, so that I could just go home and cook them like hamburger. The manager told me to always pick out the meat I wanted and give it to them, rather than getting the ground turkey from the rack, because the preground has skin in it.

I used to make the foods in different combos, like the mini pasta stars with chicken and broccoli, or rice with turkey and carrots (steamed and pureed veggies), and then I froze them in ice cube trays, so I knew how many ounces she was eating.

Later, we wound up keeping everything separate when she was older so she could choose, but still made it the same way.

mommyandmore
03-30-2007, 11:45 PM
Oh my goodness, I'm sorry I didn't see this thread the first time- I consider myself an expert at grinding food for kids! I have taught for 6 years in a class for students with severe disabilities and I grind all their breakfast and lunches for them. First, get a GOOD food processor. I do school lunches so "table food" for the kids but the important thing is that you don't want to dump everything together. At least, this is assuming that you are hoping your daughter can eat regular food some day? If so, then you want to preserve the different tastes for her so she can get used to them. And I spice the food like I would for any kid. Actually, some of the kids love spicy or tangy food because they are hyposensitive to taste. Bread type products don't grind up well. Can she eat rice? Some of the kids can eat rice cause it is small so I make the cheesy rice that you can buy in a box and make it extra soupy for them. Pizza does not grind up well at all! Mac and cheese and pasta does well but you usually have to add extra liquid. Are you working with a nutritionist at all? Because I do different things for different kids depending on their medical needs. Like one kiddo needs tons of calories so I will melt butter and mix it with milk to add as a liquid. Otherwise, water works for most things. For hamburger, I usually grind it with a can of tomato sauce and several cans of water- that way it is like ketchup! Chicken grinds well but it is easier if it is plain chicken breast, not the breaded type like chiken nuggets- though you can do those. A lot of times I think BBQ sauce with water to add to chicken. A lot of times I will do canned veggies for the kids and I keep the "juice" from the cans and will toss that in with the meat. Frozen broccoli works well- cook it up and whirl it- I might add a little dressing or mayo to make it smoother if you need to. I have a whole routine on Fridays when I do all the food- I'm prepping two meals a day for 6 kids and it usually takes about 3 hours. There are some quick and easy stand-by's I use too if I am in a hurry. Refried beans (canned) are easy- I thin with a little liquid. If you are trying textures, you can fork mash beans too- my kids love garbanzo beans for some reason. You can use white beans in a can and make it like you are makeing tuna- I actually eat that as a sandwich sometimes. I make tuna for the kids sometimes but it can get pricey. I usually blend it for just a few seconds. Any of the Chef Boy Ardee pasta that you get in a can grinds easily and you can often get them at the dollar store. There is always applesauce for fruit in a pinch or I mash bananas with a fork. When we go out in the community, we take applesauce and pudding and we try to eat somewhere where they have refried beans (taco bell) mashed potatoes (KFC) or rice (chinese food). If we are trying to build texture in for a kid I will grind a blender full nice and smooth and then do one for less amount of time and mix them together. Oatmeal is easy for the morning or I do eggs a lot- just scrambled eggs and then spin them a bit with the food processor to get them smaller then add a little milk or sourcream or whatever to make them easier to eat. Instant mashed potatoes are quick and easy to provide the starch part of a meal. Frenchfries do not grind well. Any veggie is pretty easy- you might have to add a little of the water you cooked it in to make it a little smoother. Oh, Mcdonald's mcflurries are great for kids that are ready for a little more texture- we literally taught one boy to eat using Oreo McFlurry's!
That's all I can think of for now. Just make sure you keep food seperate- think of how you would want to eat it! When I first started teaching in this class, they would literally dump the lunch food tray in the blender and add the carton of milk and serve it to the kid- gross!
And we make a big deal with my kids of letting them know what they are eating and talking about it ("Oh, yummy mashed potatoes aren't those good. Do you want some of these peas? They have lemon pepper today, do you like that?" etc) In part because it is respectful to the kids and also to try to build that sense of enjoyment of food for them. Think about what a huge part of your life food is and how much it makes you happy and a lot of these kids are not used to having positive interactions with food because of their feeding difficulties so I think it is important to give them that.

Whosemom
04-01-2007, 11:24 PM
I have 3 kids and probably bought a total of 12 jars of baby food. And (shhhh, don't tell) I'm just cheap, no allergies, or trying to go all organic or anything. Believe everyone, it is really easy. I am totally NOT a kitchen person. Basically, I overcooked their share a bit and threw it in the blender.:goodvibes

cancer_survivor_06
04-02-2007, 12:03 AM
Thank you everyone who has replied to this post with all of the helpful info. I have gone to my local library for the book that ya'll have recommended but someone beat me to it. I will be checking back often for it.

Whosemom thanks for the laugh I have never in my life thought that I would consider doing this but I have finally decide that I need to save money.

Mommyandmore thank you so much for sharing all of this info I will be sending you some PM's with questions about some of the things you do/use.

luvsmickeymouse
04-13-2007, 10:07 PM
I made all of my baby food. I have 2 very healthy kids. They are 19 and 17. Both born with a cleft lip and palate. They have had alot of surgeries. My oldest son , adopted from Korea, is all done with surgery. My youngest, adopted from The Phillipines, weighed just 10 lbs. at a year old! :scared1: I feel that homemade baby food was great for my kids, and it saved alot of money!

minkydog
04-29-2007, 06:59 PM
Christian ate pureed foods until he was about 8yo. He is severely mentally handicapped and autistic, which caused him to be extremely orally defensive. He also had a swallowing disorder, so all his food had to be the consistency of oatmeal. I used a little food grinder for years to mash up the food and remove the strings & hulls. He ate everything we ate.

Now he's 12yo. He still has some feeding issues but he can handle some texture. We just mash his food with a fork now or dice into tiny pieces for him. Incidentally, he will eat almost anything we give him, very unusual for an autistic child.