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View Full Version : Perfectly Princess Tea for 10 yr old?


Lollipop's Mom
08-10-2006, 06:24 PM
Just how 'young' is the tea party geared for? My DD is young at heart, but a very mature girl in most ways (very much a preteen as opposed to a child).

Would it be a waste of money for a mature 10 yr old for this? Would she find it too young and cheesey? What is it they do for the story time and stuff??

Thanks for any opinions!

Tiffer
08-10-2006, 06:31 PM
My DD is 9 and I gave her the option and she chose the cooking class instead. I forget the exact title, cooking adventures or something like that. Although she told me she will still wear a Minnie costume in the MK for a day! :goodvibes :cheer2:

jennlovestom
08-10-2006, 06:33 PM
my dd is 9 and is going to the tea party, she is soooooooo excited

ilovejack02
08-10-2006, 06:34 PM
My DD is 9 and I gave her the option and she chose the cooking class instead. I forget the exact title, cooking adventures or something like that. Although she told me she will still wear a Minnie costume in the MK for a day! :goodvibes :cheer2:


Grand Cooking Adventures at the Grand Floridian. I just booked it for DS who is 4 and LOVES LOVES LOVES to cook. I saw a show about it on the travel channel. It looked so cute. I am going to go to the spa there while he is in class. :yay:

I would love to go to the tea party, but i think im a little old lol.

chigirl
08-10-2006, 07:06 PM
Isn't it sad that media & retail has pumped these kids so full of "pre-teen" and Tween nonsense that you have to even ask if a 10 year old child is too old for a sweet tea party??? I know I was a large-haired punk in the 80's listening to The Smiths & Joy Division, but it saddens me that little girls are being forced to grow up so quickly. I have 64 employees, many with little girls, and they buy them cellphones at 8 and makeup at 9. Scary!!!! Why does an 8 year old need a cellphone...and don't give me this business that "oh so they can call me from soccer practice" etc..stay with them, they are 8!!!

I had this same question last year during my trip...I didn't book CRT because I thought my DD who was turning 13 would think it was stupid. But during the trip she said "You can eat in the castle! Cool!" so we went and had fun, even my DS, 8, had fun.

Let's let little girls be little girls. Don't push them to be teens.

Oh, the cooking class does sound AWESOME, however!!!

Lollipop's Mom
08-10-2006, 07:21 PM
Well my DD is not allowed makeup and is not a little tweenie bopper, but is definatley very mature MENTALLY for her age in many ways. I just dont want to spend $225+ for this and have her rolling her eyes because it is just too young for her. Not many 10 yr olds still enjoy 'storytime', and I just want to know how young it is geared for. My dd is still a little girl at heart, but also maturing, and might find this babyish.

laughingmama
08-10-2006, 07:27 PM
here's a link to lots of info about it

http://www.allearsnet.com/din/girlstea.htm

Lollipop's Mom
08-10-2006, 07:57 PM
Thanks I read that, but really after some first hand experience from someone with a girl the same age.

ceecee
08-10-2006, 09:35 PM
DD did Grand Adventures in cooking at age 6, they had a lot of little kids in that. She did the Pirate Cruise at 7 and was one of the oldest there. So she never wanted to do the tea party. Although she had fun, she did notice the age difference at a young age. She does not want to do the tea party at Disney, but really wants to go to the American Girl Place. I think they reach an age where they are "too old" for princess type things.

lucysdad
08-10-2006, 11:40 PM
Does she like dolls? Would she enjoy a little bracelet and a tiara? If the answer to these questions is no, then this tea party is not for her. My daughter and I went two years ago when it first started. It is a treasured memory for both of us, but we both like dolls, flowers on the table, tea cups, and pretty place settings. We love going to the annual Ballet Idaho tea party each February. Some girls like these things at age 5, age 10 and age 50. Some girls do not enjoy these events ever. The wonderful thing about being a girl in this day and age is that we are free to express ourselves in so many different ways. Let's not force each other into any prescribed molds. There's room for all of us on this planet and this world needs a good dose of tolerance right now. Maybe our daughters will lead the way!
Lucy's Mom

Lady SnowElla
08-11-2006, 06:02 AM
We have not done this because my DD8 (turning 9 in 2 weeks) is into Ella (her special name for Cinderella). I have offered several times & she responds she would do it if Ella visited instead of Aurora. In 2005 we visited the World of Disney in NYC where they had a similar experience with Ella minus the food. She did it there & loved it. She dressed in her Ella dress & had a wonderful time. Actually my oldest DD who was 12 at time did it with her little sister, as a favor to me, as the parents were asked to leave the room for a short time to prepare the little Princesses. My oldest DD said it was pretty cool & she enjoyed it--would have been better if her favorite Princess, Snow, was there. I find that my DDs will dress & do stuff at Disney that they would not do at home with their friends.

mousebit
08-11-2006, 06:34 AM
We celebrated DGDs 10th BD at WDW last year and I considered it. In the end, we decided to do a grandmother/granddaughter "grown up" tea at the Grand Floridian. Sooo glad we did. She really enjoyed the entire experience. She has also outgrown the "costume stage", so we made a big deal of dressing up - put the hair in an updo with a little tiara, painted our nails, wore our sun dresses, etc. She got a lot of compliments from CMs and others about how "grown up" she looked. She loved the "fanciness" of the china and pastry trays, etc. And she learned a lot about manners and how to brew tea. The food is wonderful as is the ambiance - such a relaxing break from a fast-paced Disney vacation. It was an unforgettable experience for us.

She still likes her American Girl dolls and books, but would not have appreciated the Disney doll. I would not describe her as a "girly girl," but she enjoyed being one long enough to have tea. Afterward, she was just as happy to take down her hair, jump into the pool, get her face painted and have burgers for dinner!

:tink:

allicat
08-11-2006, 07:02 AM
I know my DD wouldnt have wanted to do it, she prefers the adult tea. She is mature for her age too and stopped wanted to do the tea parties at Disney years ago.She did the cooking class at GF when she was 7 and then that was it for those types of classes.

TONNIE
08-11-2006, 07:42 AM
I did this last year with my 9 year daughter and she loved it but she was the oldest girl there and we had a hard time finding a costume for her. I would save my money she is not 10 yet but I just asked her and she said she wouldnt do it again. :)

Eeyore2003
08-11-2006, 08:18 AM
Mousebit has a very good idea.

Last November we took my neice to the Princess Tea. She was turning 9 in 3 weeks. She's tall for her age. Probably 80% of the girls are 6 or so and under. There was 1 other tall girl there and I could tell that while the "little girl" in her loved it, the "big girl" in her felt a little uncomfortable.

I think "dressing up" for the Afternoon Tea and taking your time enjoying that is a very plausible option and sounds nice. Let's just say that after my experience with my neice, I realize I was reaching the end of "those days" and barely squeezed it in before she would REALLY feel too old. I wouldn't take her at age 10.

larklynn
08-15-2006, 07:31 AM
My dd was six and loved it she is 8 now and loves dolls and would like to do it again but has always liked any kind of tea party. She did not dress in costume last time and niether did my dn. She would probably still not dress in costume. We took both girls together and they really did not notice or care about the other little girls how old they were or what they were doing it was like their own magical world. It is an awsome experience if your daughter can get caugth up in the magic of it and likes dolls and things like that. We went to a teaparty at home with her friend and her friends 10 year old sister who loved it but it was an american girl teaparty in a teashop with crafts so it was geared a little differently. Knowing Emily the 10 year old she would have loved either though.

Angela&Kayla
08-15-2006, 11:03 AM
...I have 64 employees, many with little girls, and they buy them cellphones at 8 and makeup at 9. Scary!!!! Why does an 8 year old need a cellphone...and don't give me this business that "oh so they can call me from soccer practice" etc..stay with them, they are 8!!!

My daughter got a cell phone when she turned 7. It is one of those firefly phones, where they can only call and receive calls from numbers I program in. Even though I am an extremely involved mom, there are times she is away from me. For example, when she goes to her dad's house on the weekends I want her to be able to call me if she wants. Also, kids sometimes get misplaced in large crowds accidentally, and if this happens, I want her to be able to reach me immediately.


Sorry about this being so OT, but I really don't like when people place judgement on other people for choices they make regarding their children. You won't see me at McDonald's yelling at parents for feeding their kids junk...even though that is considered by many just as wrong as an eight year old having a cell phone.


But, regarding the post (again, sorry), I thought about bringing my daughter, now eight, and decided she was too old for this particular event. She is big into American Girl Dolls, so we will be making a trip to American Girl Place Chicago instead. By doing this, she will not feel too old or too awkward if only real little girls are there, but instead will feel very comfortable with others her age & older at the AG Place.