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kaceyisme
08-08-2006, 10:00 AM
My SIL has booked a private room at V&A for Christmas Day dinner for our group of 12 (which includes five children, ages 15, 14, 13, 6 and 4).

Has anyone eaten in the private room and what was your experience? We have never had the pleasure to dine at V&A before, so I am looking forward to it with great expectation! I guess that having a private room is a plus for us with the kids, but do you lose any of the ambiance of the restaurant? TIA!

coasterbob
08-08-2006, 10:48 AM
My SIL has booked a private room at V&A for Christmas Day dinner for our group of 12 (which includes five children, ages 15, 14, 13, 6 and 4).

Has anyone eaten in the private room and what was your experience? We have never had the pleasure to dine at V&A before, so I am looking forward to it with great expectation! I guess that having a private room is a plus for us with the kids, but do you lose any of the ambiance of the restaurant? TIA!


Can't answer your question about the private room, but I sure wouldn't want to pay THAT bill! :rotfl2: Enjoy your dinner!

kaceyisme
08-08-2006, 11:15 AM
Can't answer your question about the private room, but I sure wouldn't want to pay THAT bill! :rotfl2: Enjoy your dinner!

lol, me too - my BIL is being very generous and treating us all to a wonderful Christmas trip to Disney. My DH and DS and I will be going for five nights, but the rest of the family are going for twelve nights! I would love to get some feedback on V&A's, especially if anyone has done the private dining room!

Cheshire Figment
08-08-2006, 03:30 PM
All the PDR is is a room off the main DR. It holds three tables of four each. Basically everything in it is the same as the main DR, except you can't hear the harpist as well and the door can be closed so your noise does not disturb the other diners. There is nothing special about it.

Big question is can the 6yo and 4yo keep from disturbing everyone during a 2 hour long meal? And don't forget the same $100 per person cost applies to them, there is no children's menu!

ElizabethB
08-08-2006, 07:33 PM
It's hard for me to imagine that a 4 yo and a 6 yo will be still for a 2 1/2 hour dinner -- on Christmas Day no less! It's a very adult-oriented meal with absolutely nothing to interest children who would rather be home playing with what Santa brought!

schoen
08-08-2006, 08:51 PM
I think you'll have a wonderful time. I think the kids will have a wonderful time because they will be in WDW with their family at Christmas for 12 nights! Talk about a kids dream come true. Santa AND Disney!. It will be nice to be in the private room, I think it will help make a very special evening even more special. The food is amazing. The waitstaff is plesant and not at all stuffy. Some of the other guests can be a little snobby, but you will not have to deal with that because you will have the private room. I think it sounds like an amazing way to spend the holiday, and I hope you all have a wonderful time!

robinb
08-08-2006, 08:58 PM
I guess that having a private room is a plus for us with the kids, but do you lose any of the ambiance of the restaurant? TIA!
Whatever ambiance you lose, the other diners gain by having a closed door between them and two pre-schoolers. I know your BIL is trying to do something special for his family, but Victoria and Alberts is not for young children. Even on Christmas. It is an adult restaurant and I think that your family just may ruin a quiet, romantic Christmas dinner of a an entire dining room full of other people.

kaceyisme
08-08-2006, 09:20 PM
Whatever ambiance you lose, the other diners gain by having a closed door between them and two pre-schoolers. I know your BIL is trying to do something special for his family, but Victoria and Alberts is not for young children. Even on Christmas. It is an adult restaurant and I think that your family just may ruin a quiet, romantic Christmas dinner of a an entire dining room full of other people.

They are all very well behaved children, so I doubt that they will "ruin a quiet, romantic Christmas dinner of a an entire dining room full of other people" especially since we will be in a private dining room. I'm not calling the shots on this dinner, I'm an invited guest, along with my DH and DS14. I'm planning on enjoying every minute of it!

Big question is can the 6yo and 4yo keep from disturbing everyone during a 2 hour long meal? And don't forget the same $100 per person cost applies to them, there is no children's menu!

My SIL spoke with the restaurant when she signed the contract for the dinner, and I know they will be providing food for the kids that they will like. The parents also always bring lots of diversions for the children when they go out to eat.

robinb
08-08-2006, 09:33 PM
They are all very well behaved children, so I doubt that they will "ruin a quiet, romantic Christmas dinner of a an entire dining room full of other people" especially since we will be in a private dining room.
Keep on telling yourself that if it makes you fell better about it. Even the most well behaved 4 and 6 year olds gets antsy during a stuffy, adult oriented 2 1/2 hour dinner of quail eggs and fois gras. Not to mention a pair of children who have been up since the crack of dawn for Christmas at WDW. Don't believe me, though. Believe the other people who also told you that they don't belong. Perhaps you should email your BIL this thread so he can see for himself. I'm just glad that my reservation for V&As is not on Christmas day or I would be changing it. It's simply not fair to the other adult diners to bring young children to that restaurant, private dining room or not.

BCV23
08-08-2006, 09:38 PM
My SIL has booked a private room at V&A for Christmas Day dinner for our group of 12 (which includes five children, ages 15, 14, 13, 6 and 4).

Has anyone eaten in the private room and what was your experience? We have never had the pleasure to dine at V&A before, so I am looking forward to it with great expectation! I guess that having a private room is a plus for us with the kids, but do you lose any of the ambiance of the restaurant? TIA!

It sounds like a wonderful treat and a very special way to enjoy Christmas dinner together. :grouphug:

We have been seated in that room once but not when it was being used for a private group like yours. I have also seen one long table set in there probably for a group like yours.

There is a fireplace and the room is decorated beautifully for Christmas. There are glass doors so you won't disturb others in the main dining room and they won't disturb you. ;)

Enjoy and be sure to let us know about your dinner please. :sunny:

kaceyisme
08-08-2006, 09:42 PM
It sounds like a wonderful treat and a very special way to enjoy Christmas dinner together. :grouphug:

We have been seated in that room once but not when it was being used for a private group like yours. I have also seen one long table set in there probably for a group like yours.

There is a fireplace and the room is decorated beautifully for Christmas. There are glass doors so you won't disturb others in the main dining room and they won't disturb you. ;)

Enjoy and be sure to let us know about your dinner please. :sunny:

Thanks for the good wishes - I will surely let you know when we get back!

Keep on telling yourself that if it makes you fell better about it. Even the most well behaved 4 and 6 year olds gets antsy during a stuffy, adult oriented 2 1/2 hour dinner of quail eggs and fois gras. Not to mention a pair of children who have been up since the crack of dawn for Christmas at WDW. Don't believe me, though. Believe the other people who also told you that they don't belong. Perhaps you should email your BIL this thread so he can see for himself. I'm just glad that my reservation for V&As is not on Christmas day or I would be changing it. It's simply not fair to the other adult diners to bring young children to that restaurant, private dining room or not.

Wow - you feel pretty strongly about this, huh? :confused3 I guess it is good that you don't have a reservation there that night, although you seem upset enough like you do. Like I said, I am a guest, and I plan to enjoy myself. I don't see how it is unfair to other diners to bring children there when we will be in our own room.

Peepster
08-08-2006, 09:55 PM
We've had the pleasure of eating at Vic and Al's several times now and very much enjoy it. I have seen older children bored to tears and others truly into the experience. And I'm an old fogey who would probably roll my eyes upon seeing young children there during my expensive dining time...NOW, having said all that I'd like to add that I, in no way, feel qualified to judge your family's children. Children who are accustomed to dining out, no matter the age, may behave like perfect angels. It appears that your SIL and the restaurant have been thoughtful in the arrangements for both your dining and the other diners comfort. Personally, I think it's wonderful that your family can enjoy this very special treat and I hope you all have a wonderful time.

robinb
08-08-2006, 10:19 PM
Wow - you feel pretty strongly about this, huh? :confused3 I guess it is good that you don't have a reservation there that night, although you seem upset enough like you do. Like I said, I am a guest, and I plan to enjoy myself. I don't see how it is unfair to other diners to bring children there when we will be in our own room.

Because I believe that the door, should you choose to close it, will not be enough to block the noise of two small children. People go to Victoria and Albert's for a child-free meal. Child-free at their own table and child-free at other tables. Even happy 4-year old chatter can be heard over the gentle music of the harpist and intrude on the romantic meal of a couple in the other room. Imagine a very quiet museum or library or listening to a quartet and than a pair of children fighting over a toy. Add to the mix that every table is spending at least $225 and some much, much more and you will begin to understand what I'm talking about. I think that your BIL is being terribly selfish by bringing his children to Victoria and Albert's. There are other choices, any other restaurant on property for instance, that would be better for a 4 and 6 year old.

I am sure that you and your family will enjoy yourselves, but I cannot say the same for the rest of the dining room.

BCV23
08-08-2006, 10:30 PM
Robin, I think V&A would have advised kacey's SIL if they thought it inappropriate. The glass doors are off the hallway. There is another set of doors that links the two rooms but again if V&A thought it would be a problem I'm sure they would have said so. And as I recall those doors are solid so those in the private dining room will have a nice quiet space. There is even a contract so it looks like everyone knows what is involved. I know I have never had to sign a contract before dining at V&A.

And kacey said her son was 14!

kacey, again have fun. I'm sure you will all treasure your memory of Christmas dinner at V&A

yearbook50
08-08-2006, 10:30 PM
Keep on telling yourself that if it makes you fell better about it. Even the most well behaved 4 and 6 year olds gets antsy during a stuffy, adult oriented 2 1/2 hour dinner of quail eggs and fois gras. Not to mention a pair of children who have been up since the crack of dawn for Christmas at WDW. Don't believe me, though. Believe the other people who also told you that they don't belong. Perhaps you should email your BIL this thread so he can see for himself. I'm just glad that my reservation for V&As is not on Christmas day or I would be changing it. It's simply not fair to the other adult diners to bring young children to that restaurant, private dining room or not.

Not all kids are bad. I was 7 my first V&A experience. I was better behaved than some of the adults there. An elderly couple at the table next to us complimented my parents for having such a well behaved child.

Children can be taught to behave in adult environments. It isn't that hard. I knew exactly what was expected of me and it isn't that hard to act that way.

robinb
08-08-2006, 10:57 PM
There is even a contract so it looks like everyone knows what is involved. I know I have never had to sign a contract before dining at V&A.


They probably have a contract because of the private dining room and the fact that they are a large group. Disney doesn't want to lose out on that many tables all at once under the regular cancellation policy. Secondly, this is a big group and I have found that Disney goes out of their way for Grand Gatherings. Lastly, I'm sure that neither WDW or V&A's will turn down the over $1200 that this family will spend on one dinner alone. So they accommodate them.

And kacey said her son was 14!
Her son is not the problem. He will be bored, but I'm certain that he will behave. It's the 4 year old and the 6 year old that I am worried about.

FWIW, I do hope for the comfort of the other guests that the doors will be heavy enough to block any noise.

NejTheLion
08-09-2006, 03:53 AM
RobinB-

You might want to reserve such judgments since you have no concrete knowledge of these children or this family. It is one thing to say that V&A is an adult-oriented restaurant (very true) and that most children might not enjoy the experience (also true) and another entirely to insist that the evening will be ruined for the other guests (pure conjecture on your part).

V&A will continue to serve children in the future as it has in the past. When you book V&A for either Thanksgiving or Christmas, you can be fairly assured that there WILL be children eating in the restaurant - quite a few, in fact. That's just common sense, and anyone dining at V&A on those nights should expect it. If you look for a wonderful post from MrDisney about the V&A Chef's Table, you'll hear how popular the macaroni and cheese was among the children on the night they dined (I can't remember which holiday it was exactly, but it was one of the one's above). The mac & cheese order was called up so many times that the gentlemen asked if they could try some out of pure curiosity.

The private dining room is needed simply because that number of guests could easily make enough noise (children or no) to disturb the other diners. Whether you're speaking loudly or not, a large group always tends to be noisier. And if the waitstaff needs to address all of the diners, they too need to speak at a greater volume to be heard by all.

And as for your snide remarks about Disney's contract, that has everything to do with not being able to handle a cancellation of that size last minute and absolutely nothing to do with allowing one family to get away with anything because of a bigger check. In all honesty, Disney is probably losing money with this group. The relatively large number of children means that fewer guests will be drinking wine (where a sizable portion of the profit comes from), and the included gratuity (which I would assume for a party this size is part of the deal) is probably less than several individual tables would pay added together.

So please, hurry and go visit Disney ASAP because you seriously need a dose of pixie dust!

Uncleromulus
08-09-2006, 05:46 AM
Let's knock off the debate about the kids, please??

kaceyisme
08-09-2006, 08:07 AM
Thank you to all who have responded to me, but I am going to ask that this thread be closed because it never was intended to be a debate about kids. It was intended to ask a question about a restaurant that I have not had the pleasure to experience yet, and was intended to ask about that restaurant. Everyone definitely has an opinion about everything, and that is fine, but I don't want any acrimony about our Christmas dinner.

Uncleromulus
08-09-2006, 08:18 AM
Closed.