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decaff38
08-04-2006, 09:30 PM
My daughter and I went to the bookstore to get her books for college. WOW!!! For 4 general classes and labs her textbook total was 485.00 and 3 of the 4 texts were used!!! I refuse to accept that as normal!! I wrote down all the ISBN#s, titles, editions and authors . I came home and spent the last 6 hours searching for alternative places to buy. I have one more book to buy and my total is right about $$ 220.00! They are not new but are the correct editions. I remember how, when I was in college and I bought books and barely used them then sold them for 1/3 the price at the end of the quarter. I did a textbook search and found:
campusbooks.com, eCampus.com, didrecttextbooks.com, bookbyte.com, valorebooks.com, half.com but my favorite was bigwords.com. they compare all the sellers and list all the places to purchase. Be careful you are using the correct ISBN and then check the edition # to make sure you are ordering the right one.

Good luck with your searching!!!

dsanner106
08-04-2006, 09:41 PM
Be very careful about editions, even send them a confirming email confirming editions and that they are not international editions or teacher editions. Some teachers will not allow them in the classroom and they cannot be resold at buyback.

Drew

Blueeyes101817
08-04-2006, 09:43 PM
i just spent a couple hours tonight working on my books for the semester..i got 8 of them for 161 from half.com...i refuse to buy them from the bookstore!

lost*in*cyberspace
08-04-2006, 09:52 PM
her textbook total was 485.00 and 3 of the 4 texts were used!!! I refuse to accept that as normal!!

Sadly, it is normal, even a bit on the low side. This is one cost you are never really prepared for when your child starts college. My youngest will be a senior this fall, so I've spent years buying textbooks. We have been buying his texts for the last few semesters on Amazon, which means we pay no sales tax and since I am an Amazon Prime member, free shipping. That saves us a bit.

PenguinWaiters
08-04-2006, 10:12 PM
I work at a college and one thing that I have found that students don't take advantage of enough is textbooks on reserve in the library. Many professors will have the current edition on reserve in the campus library that you can read there for free.

Of course, you can't mark it up, but most students honestly do not do themselves any good with all of the highlighting that they do :artist: - taking written notes is a much better way to assist in recall.

This doesn't always work for all books - obviously you need to purchase your own workbooks, etc... but it can save on buying a few books each semester, and gets you into the library on a regular basis - another good habit to get into.

I also encourage students to ask their professors about this service. I think all textbooks used in a class should be available this way, and many professors can get additional **free** copies of the books from the publishers to do this, but just don't think about it until someone asks.

Hope this helps! Good luck to your student. Encourage them to visit their campus Academic Services Center to meet more helpful people like me :thumbsup2

Terri

petrymom
08-04-2006, 10:17 PM
How funny - just did this on Sunday. I am waiting for 1 more book and I am done. I saved a little over $50 IF I could get used at the bookstore. In the nursing program, many of the books are NOT sold back and you end up buying new books every semester. I love the internet. :thumbsup2

MrsPete
08-04-2006, 10:18 PM
Question:

When I was in college in the 80s, I used to go to the campus bookstore and buy used books for my classes as soon as the lists were posted -- always before classes began. Why? Because they had so few used books available that they disappeared in no time. Then I'd scour all the bulletin boards on campus trying to buy a really cheap used copy from an individual (we had only one on-campus bookstore, no off-campus competition, so we were really at their mercy). IF I was lucky and found the book for less money, I could return the used book to the campus bookstore for a refund. There was no penalty for returning a book -- as long as you had the receipt, of course.

Is this still a viable choice today?

Now that you have great internet resources, what percentage of the books are you able to find used?

It'll be years before my daughters are ready to buy college textbooks, but I was always interested in beating the bookstore at their own game.

M 'n C
08-04-2006, 10:19 PM
careful on some of those websites. I bought through text book exchange (not sure the exact link) and I never got my book!!! So just make sure you pay through a Credit Card because that website was not going to help me any but discover fixed it in 2 days. Also make sure shipping is covered so you have it in time for the first week. Sometimes its best to wait until the first day of class to buy because the teachers will tell you if you need the book or not so you could save $$ there.

MrsPete
08-04-2006, 10:24 PM
I work at a college and one thing that I have found that students don't take advantage of enough is textbooks on reserve in the library. Many professors will have the current edition on reserve in the campus library that you can read there for free.I did this frequently -- especially during a few semesters when I really couldn't afford to buy books. Those books really saved my butt, but they're not convenient to use. You cannot leave the reserve room with the book, you never know whether someone else already be using the one book you need, and you have to go during library hours. Still, sometimes you have to do what you can do, not what you wish you could do.

A couple times I had professors who'd require us to buy 2-3 books for ONE CLASS, yet when I looked over the syllabus I'd see that they only wanted us to read two chapters of this book and three chapters of that book -- THAT was when I really appreciated the reserve room!

Another thing I did occasionally, when the opportunity arose: I shared books with friends. It wasn't convenient the night before a test, but it meant we could actually have the book in the dorms -- much more convenient than the library.

MrsPete
08-04-2006, 10:26 PM
Sometimes its best to wait until the first day of class to buy because the teachers will tell you if you need the book or not so you could save $$ there.What if you get the wrong book, or if you drop the class? Can books from internet sources be returned? I mean, if I buy a novel that I don't care for, I can toss it. I'd be pretty upset to find myself stuck with a $60 math book.

sbpuckett
08-04-2006, 10:35 PM
The most recent class I took was 2 summers ago and money was very tight. I actually went and talked to the professor and she let me borrow a copy of the text she had. Saved me something like $60... just a suggestion!

M 'n C
08-04-2006, 10:40 PM
What if you get the wrong book, or if you drop the class? Can books from internet sources be returned? I mean, if I buy a novel that I don't care for, I can toss it. I'd be pretty upset to find myself stuck with a $60 math book.
that is why I usually chose to wait until the first day because the book store is usually accurate (not always though) but the teachers that are nice will let you know if the edition before is ok to use or if they won't use the book at all since the department heads dictate which books they get to use and which editions. Most the time the edition before was ok all that changes are the pictures for the most part.

If you buy directly from amazon or something you can return but not to a seller.

branv
08-04-2006, 10:49 PM
Of all the websites I've gone through to buy textbooks my favorite is Amazon used books. I always get the best deal there and it's guaranteed.

One more important thing...sell your books on Amazon! I get WAY more money for my textbooks then what the school bookstore will pay me. I bought my Spanish book, barely used, on Amazon for $32 (our bookstore was charging $55), and sold it for $27 :) Bookstore was giving $10.

I have mentioned this to several students and they always say, "well it will take me too long to get my books!" At Amazon for about $3-$5 extra they can get priority shipping, still cheaper then the college store textbooks - or - most campus bookstore's have the class book list available for student viewing at least 2 weeks to a month before classes start so that you can "reserve" them. All these students would have to do would be to make a little effort to check it out before classes (especially if they have a website like my school's does ;) ) and they could start ordering in advance in time for class. But it just seems like it goes in one ear and out the other..some of them don't mind spending their parent's money I guess :teeth:

decaff38
08-04-2006, 11:19 PM
These are basic core classes with about 300 kids in each lecture, not an option to ask the teacher for a copy of the text. I also used the reference copies when I could and it worked okay for me occationally. I checked over all the info on the books and made sure they were correct. THis is a state college and I doubt she will even have her texts(4 inches thick) with her in class. Most often it is just a frantic note taking session. For a third of the costs she will get through the basic core classes the same as someone who is paying full price. I pride myself of being resourceful and find the best deal for a decent price. I got 3 off of half.com and 3 more from valore.com. We will see how it goes. There are many on line at full price so if we run into difficulties we can send for them quickly. She will need to have her own copy because she is workin g3 nights a week from 12:30am to 6:30am and will be using most of her time to study and read. I'm sure it will work out. Hope someone else finds some great deals too. We will be reselling on half.com in Jan.

denecarter
08-04-2006, 11:36 PM
My friend swears by abebooks.com. I didn't have ISBN numbers or editions, so I couldn't get DD's that way. She is using the off-campus bookstore.

My best book snag in college... bought a brand new (new edition) biology book, Professor told us we could use previous edition if friend or relative had one, saw previous edition at campus library book sale, took back $70-ish dollar book (yeah, it was a while ago) and got all my money back. And my library sale book... cost me a quarter! :cool1:

grlpwrd
08-04-2006, 11:38 PM
Be very careful about editions, even send them a confirming email confirming editions and that they are not international editions or teacher editions. Some teachers will not allow them in the classroom and they cannot be resold at buyback.

Drew

::yes::

My school bookstore has books in packets, too, with a text and workbook or solution manual which seem to have a different ISBN number compared to when they are separate and listed on the bookstore website. :confused3

I have had a luck on half.com .

dementia412
08-05-2006, 12:11 AM
My first semester back to school I had no money before classes started so I bought all of my books at the school store... ack, used geology book for like $65 was my best deal.

I know that at my school you can only return a book for full price either 1, before schools starts (still in package if it was wrapped), or 2, after classses start IF you have proof you dropped the class or it was the wrong book/teacher changed texts AND it's still in the package.

My three biggest problems with internet cheap book buying
1. teachers who don't list their books untill two days b4 classes
2. editions, how can there be so many @$* $^&! editions of one book?!
3. having the books returned because I have a lazy mail... person

other than that it's a great bargain :teeth:

Barbers2005
08-05-2006, 02:58 AM
I just graduated from one of the larger NY state universities, and the campus bookstore is the biggest rip-off in town when it comes to books. There are two other bookstores less than five miles away that are both cheaper than buying books at the college and they have larger stocks of used books. Competition for student business is so fierce that one of the bookstores rents a limo to give students rides from campus to their store the first week of classes. I know not every college will have alternative bookstores nearby, but I bet a lot of them do, especially in cities with more than one school. Check the local phone book or look in the ads section of the student newspaper.

dizcrazee
08-05-2006, 05:04 AM
I'm a college professor and I have had many students get burned by ordering books from these discount sites. I always put my textbooks on reserve in the library, but that is really not a very effective solution, unless you plan on spending a lot of time in the library - they can't be checked out. I recommend biting the bullet and buying the ridiculously overpriced ones in the bookstore. It really makes me mad that these publishing companies are charging such outrageous prices for college textbooks. :furious:

Cindy B
08-05-2006, 05:14 AM
That reminds me to get on the stick for my classes. I have two classes at two different campuses, so its a bit of driving.

Yes, going used is the way to go. However, you do have to have to make sure that the colleges are using the exact title. Some colleges are sneaky and bundle it together with specific text/workbooks/cds and such and they say you need it all.

Good luck.

I've been lucky and as a mid junior, I've only had to pay new for just my teaching courses (general ed classes easy to find used). Now I'm taking specialty courses, its trickier.

Kellyscrapbooks
08-05-2006, 08:03 AM
I sell my used textbooks on Amazon. They pay a ton more than I could get in the bookstore. I have bought a bunch there too, you just have to make sure that you are ordering the correct one. :)

MsLeFever
08-05-2006, 08:09 AM
varsitybooks.com is another good site for texts.

I'm a college prof and am constarntly AMAZED by just how expensive textbooks can be. In classes where I get to choose the text I always consider the prices when I choose books but sometimes the publishers don't offer much in the way of cheaper alternatives.

It's always worth asking around to see if someone has taken the class before and is willing to sell or loan their old books!

lost*in*cyberspace
08-05-2006, 09:15 AM
I have mentioned this to several students and they always say, "well it will take me too long to get my books!" At Amazon for about $3-$5 extra they can get priority shipping,

If you are an Amazon Prime member, you get FREE 2 day shipping for most items sold by Amazon (not Amazon merchants).

I have found my $79 annual fee for this service has paid for itself in free, fast shipping many times over.

Cindy B
08-05-2006, 09:18 AM
www.collegebooksdirect.com is also a good source. They pay pretty well for buyback as well.

grlpwrd
08-05-2006, 12:23 PM
2. editions, how can there be so many @$* $^&! editions of one book?!


http://bestsmileys.com/lol/21.gif So true! One text is in its 21st edition. :confused3 I can only imagine how much they will be when my kids get into college.

Thanks for all the links. I am adding it to my bookmarks for the neverending search for affordable books. :thumbsup2

Missy Mouse
08-05-2006, 12:28 PM
My daughter and I went to the bookstore to get her books for college. WOW!!! For 4 general classes and labs her textbook total was 485.00 and 3 of the 4 texts were used!!! I refuse to accept that as normal!! I wrote down all the ISBN#s, titles, editions and authors . I came home and spent the last 6 hours searching for alternative places to buy. I have one more book to buy and my total is right about $$ 220.00! They are not new but are the correct editions. I remember how, when I was in college and I bought books and barely used them then sold them for 1/3 the price at the end of the quarter. I did a textbook search and found:
campusbooks.com, eCampus.com, didrecttextbooks.com, bookbyte.com, valorebooks.com, half.com but my favorite was bigwords.com. they compare all the sellers and list all the places to purchase. Be careful you are using the correct ISBN and then check the edition # to make sure you are ordering the right one.

Good luck with your searching!!!

I'm on my own for college tuition and book so I never ever buy from efollet or our school bookstore, who partners with them. I always shop ebay or amazon.com and get a great deal every time. My statistics book was $100 in my bookstore, I bought it online (same edition) for $17 after shipping and tax. Even if it's not the same edition, most professors are okay with you purchasing a book that's one or two editions behind the current one.

Belle5
08-05-2006, 12:50 PM
I haven't read through all of these responses but wanted to say that last summer I purchased books online ahead of time and several of the professors changed required books on my son's first day of classes. We did actually end up losing some money on books by purchasing too early.

Secondly, some one mentioned highlighting not helping a student. My son declares his good grades are largely due to feeling free to mark up his books. I told him if he continues to pull a 4.0 he can destroy his books if need be. :p

babiesX2
08-05-2006, 01:06 PM
I haven't seen this mentioned -- Dh and I rented our college textbooks. Rental prices were 1/4 to 1/3 of the used prices. We have two universities within 10 miles of each other and the rental store is located nearer to one of them. It carries texts for both campuses. We never marked in them (my experience proved this to be useless), but we would get rentals that others had so I take it that it was OK to do so. If on the first day of class, the book had been changed, the rental could be exchanged without any charge. My Dh is a researcher, and he is going to find the very best deal before investing. We saved tons of money by renting -- even considering the buy back money we could have gotten.

I'm starting an online RN to BSN program at the end of this month. I nearly passed out when my advisor told me the price of the nursing texts! I'm going to have to go another route to find cheaper texts so thanks for the book links! I can't rent because you have to be enrolled in one of the affiliated universities in our area to be able to rent from the one we used before.

PenguinWaiters
08-05-2006, 01:16 PM
Secondly, some one mentioned highlighting not helping a student. My son declares his good grades are largely due to feeling free to mark up his books. I told him if he continues to pull a 4.0 he can destroy his books if need be. :p

Highlighting a book is great, if done well. Many students (that I see) highlight every other sentence which becomes meaningless - hence the icon I used - :artist:

I am glad your son is doing well - sounds like he knows what he's doing! :thumbsup2 One of the best strategies I encourage students to do is to write questions and comments in the margins of the book - their reactions to the text. Makes them interact and think about what they are reading and not zone out. Also, when the prof asks if there are any questions, they can refer to those they wrote in the margins as they read. A well marked up book is a useful thing! A poorly marked up book is a bummer for the next person who buys it! ;)

So as to make this post just a little bit on topic :blush: I second a PP suggestion of using other local bookstores - they do tend to have more used copies that the official campus bookstore for some reason. Also, I know students use campus message boards to sell directly to each other, eliminating the middle man. This is great if you are up to date on which edition you need (although many profs will allow older editions too).

ticktock
08-05-2006, 01:48 PM
These are basic core classes with about 300 kids in each lecture, not an option to ask the teacher for a copy of the text. I pride myself of being resourceful and find the best deal for a decent price.

Just an OT comment- if you were really looking for the best price for the money you should have sent your dd to a community college for the first two years. The basic core classes are MUCH smaller and teachers have more time for students. Plus it's ALOT cheaper - as long as you make sure your credits will transfer to your new school.

My Dh did this for his engineering degree and it worked out great. We plan on doing this for our ds even though he will go to one of the highest rated college prep high schools in North America and will have Ivy League schools throwing scholarships at him.

Not only will it be cheaper in the long run, he will have more individual attention from teachers and will be closer to home(where we can keep better track of any problems that arise). Plus your degree comes from the school you graduate from, so why pay more for less service just to go to a big name school your first two years? This is the reason so many people are crying about student loans. I'm sorry I have no sympathy for someone that racks up $60,000 in loans for a degree in social services (or whatever). It is exactly like over spending on credit cards - you didn't NEED that $400.00 pair of shoes you could have gotten by with a $40.00 pair. Not that the OP and her dd are doing this, but MANY people are and it's absurd. All right totally off topic rant over. SORRY!

englishteacha
08-05-2006, 02:02 PM
I had many friends in the same degree program as me, so we often traded books at the end of the semester. I also had good luck in selling my used books with a sign on the bulletin board in my dorm-my price was less than the bookstore, but more than they'd give me for buyback. I know this doesn't help for your first semester, but for future semesters it could work out well. Most core classes have the same books no matter who you take it with (like Biology or English 101), so you can often find these books used pretty easily. As a PP said, once you get into more specialized courses, it becomes harder to find used books at the bookstore.

RangerPooh
08-05-2006, 03:11 PM
Books are definately NOT cheap! DH and I are both grad students and have spent so much on books over the last few years. We cheack the school bookstore and off site textbook stores as well as amazon and B&N. A word of caution, editions can be incorrectly listed by the seller. Also, some selelrs will ship the slowest (and cheapest) method possible whic means that it can take a month for you to get your books! This has happened to us on more than one occassion. I spent the first month of the spring semester withut books for this reason. And most teachers are not sympathetic. Something to look into is if your school has semester long textbook checkout privilages for grad students. This was what DH did this past spring semster. While you don't get to keep or mark in the book it can help cut costs on books that you rarely use :cool1: .

I forgot to mention that sometimes the bookstore can still be the way to go esp when you add in the cost of shipping/handling and the time that the book takes to arrive as missed assignments can't always be made up. I know that we always "shop" around before deciding on where to purchase our books.

As for spending $500 on books, that's actually on the low end. As an undergraduate I was a science major and would spend $200 on a geology or biology book alone. Plus they were always the new editions too as used wasn't a possibility, nor was a used lab text. I am currently pursuing my masters in education and have 15 books to buy for the fall semester alone, and not too many are on the cheap side. Just enjoy the basic undergrad gen. ed classes while you can as the major classes can get costly.

MrsPete
08-05-2006, 03:14 PM
I just graduated from one of the larger NY state universities, and the campus bookstore is the biggest rip-off in town when it comes to books. There are two other bookstores less than five miles away that are both cheaper than buying books at the college and they have larger stocks of used books. Competition for student business is so fierce that one of the bookstores rents a limo to give students rides from campus to their store the first week of classes. I know not every college will have alternative bookstores nearby, but I bet a lot of them do, especially in cities with more than one school. Check the local phone book or look in the ads section of the student newspaper.When I was in college we had two options:
1. Buy from the overpriced campus bookstore
2. Get lucky enough to find an individual selling the book; we'd scour every bulletin board on campus searching for the right books!

I always thought that things would've been better if we'd had an off-campus competitor.

Missy Mouse
08-05-2006, 03:22 PM
Just an OT comment- if you were really looking for the best price for the money you should have sent your dd to a community college for the first two years. The basic core classes are MUCH smaller and teachers have more time for students. Plus it's ALOT cheaper - as long as you make sure your credits will transfer to your new school.

My Dh did this for his engineering degree and it worked out great. We plan on doing this for our ds even though he will go to one of the highest rated college prep high schools in North America and will have Ivy League schools throwing scholarships at him.

Not only will it be cheaper in the long run, he will have more individual attention from teachers and will be closer to home(where we can keep better track of any problems that arise). Plus your degree comes from the school you graduate from, so why pay more for less service just to go to a big name school your first two years? This is the reason so many people are crying about student loans. I'm sorry I have no sympathy for someone that racks up $60,000 in loans for a degree in social services (or whatever). It is exactly like over spending on credit cards - you didn't NEED that $400.00 pair of shoes you could have gotten by with a $40.00 pair. Not that the OP and her dd are doing this, but MANY people are and it's absurd. All right totally off topic rant over. SORRY!

Actually, there's no such thing as a cheap education. My tuition runs between 5 and 7k a year for a state school, that's still between 20-30k when all is said and done. It also depends on the community college. A lot of them, especially where I live, have HUGE class sizes and the individual attention is almost nothing. Plus, better educated professors mean better educated students. A lot of excellent professors won't go to community colleges because the pay is poor and they don't have the freedom to do as they want to teach their students. So it really depends. Some people feel a higher education is worth the money, especially in so many competitive markets. Who are they going to take? The community college kid with an associates or the Harvard grad with the bachelors or masters? Certain jobs would rather see consistency (1 four year school as opposed to 2 at one and 2 at another). Unfortunately, community colleges still carry a lot of stigma.

Mouse-n-Mini
08-05-2006, 03:28 PM
I want to thank the original poster for those links. i have been trying to find this one anatomy and physiology book for a reasonable price...it's just not doable! Everyplace wants $125 for this retarded book that we'll probably crack open a handful of times this semester. I hate buying books. I wish my local private college was 4 years...they rent the books at no charge except what's allotted in tuition.

torinsmom
08-05-2006, 03:56 PM
One thing I did when I was going back to school is to check the other college libraries. In NC, all the state colleges are connected, so if you are a student at one, you can check books out from the others. I checked out many a textbook and they let me renew it unless someone else had a hold on it. I sometimes had the previous edition, but get real, in most courses, there may be 200 words changed or added, nothing that will affect your grade dramatically. I've also bought the previous edition online and always got along fine.

Marsha

Kellydelly
08-05-2006, 04:04 PM
I want to thank the original poster for those links. i have been trying to find this one anatomy and physiology book for a reasonable price...it's just not doable! Everyplace wants $125 for this retarded book that we'll probably crack open a handful of times this semester. I hate buying books. I wish my local private college was 4 years...they rent the books at no charge except what's allotted in tuition.


I ended up getting both my A&P books on ebay. One is the actual correct lab text I'm supposed to have (but minus the cd the school bookstore has with it), and the other is the 5th edition instead of the 6th edition textbook. I don't think they are for anything but reference, as most professors test off their lectures anyway. Instead of paying $210 for used books at the bookstore I got both books I need for only $57 including shipping :cool1: ! I will befriend someone with the cd if I need to download a copy of it ;) .

MrsPete
08-05-2006, 05:12 PM
Who are they going to take? The community college kid with an associates or the Harvard grad with the bachelors or masters?I'm trying to think of a job for which both of these people would apply . . . nope, I've got nothing. In the real world, these two people would never be in competition with one another.

My husband was the poster child for community college. He wasn't serious about his grades in high school, and he didn't want to go to college. A couple years of driving a fork lift convinced him that an education was worthwhile . . .

So he went to community college first, thinking he wanted to be an architect. He earned an AS in drafting, and in the process he decided that engineering was more to his liking. The AS degree allowed him to work as a draftsman during his later college years -- not the professional job that he wanted, but much better than working at McDonald's! He transferred his credits to a 4-year university and three years later graduated with an engineering degree. He says he never would've made it if he'd gone straight to the 4-year school.

Community college can be a GREAT CHOICE for the right person. Some people do it because they're not ready for a 4-year school, some do it to save money, some do it because they just don't think they can manage four more years of school or because their career aspirations only require an associate's degree.

RangerPooh
08-05-2006, 06:43 PM
Actually, there's no such thing as a cheap education. My tuition runs between 5 and 7k a year for a state school, that's still between 20-30k when all is said and done. It also depends on the community college. A lot of them, especially where I live, have HUGE class sizes and the individual attention is almost nothing. Plus, better educated professors mean better educated students. A lot of excellent professors won't go to community colleges because the pay is poor and they don't have the freedom to do as they want to teach their students. So it really depends. Some people feel a higher education is worth the money, especially in so many competitive markets. Who are they going to take? The community college kid with an associates or the Harvard grad with the bachelors or masters? Certain jobs would rather see consistency (1 four year school as opposed to 2 at one and 2 at another). Unfortunately, community colleges still carry a lot of stigma.

I think that community college should be viewed as a starting point for a college education. It's where most people find out what they are interested in without paying the huge pricetag of a university. I started at one paying $11 a unit (back in 1997) which was much cheaper than the university that I transfered to. It alowed me to get the bulk of my gen ed done ata reasonable price. I can agree with you that a college education isn't cheap as I'm now working on my Masters degree which comes with a heaftier pricetag.

Now for some a cc education is as far as they plan to go. I have plenty of friends who decided that college wasn't for them but they needed at least an AA for a variety of jobs. Now will having only a cc education get you the $150,000 a year salary? Most likely not but it can open doors that you wouldn't have with only a hs education.

Also the quality of the instructors can vary. I ahve had classes where the CC professors were much better than the University professors for the same class. I can honestly say that the CC education that I received in Forestry was much better than what I received at a University (to finish my dregree) in Enviornmental Science. Plus there are a number of teachers who hold students to higher standards as they are preparing them to transfer to a 4-year. As well as those who have found that a 4 year is great but teaching at a CC is much more rewarding (in their opinion).

JudicialTyranny
08-05-2006, 07:02 PM
One thing that ticks me off, and this happened a few times to me, is that a book is listed as "required" for the course and then you never even end up using it!

This happened again recently when I was taking an evening course - I paid $80 for the book at the bookstore (because they listed it late and I had no time to look anywhere else - or so I thought). It was a very technical computer course and everything was lecture and projects - we never even looked at the book and there was no required reading from it. :furious:

Missy Mouse
08-05-2006, 07:24 PM
I'm trying to think of a job for which both of these people would apply . . . nope, I've got nothing. In the real world, these two people would never be in competition with one another.

My husband was the poster child for community college. He wasn't serious about his grades in high school, and he didn't want to go to college. A couple years of driving a fork lift convinced him that an education was worthwhile . . .

So he went to community college first, thinking he wanted to be an architect. He earned an AS in drafting, and in the process he decided that engineering was more to his liking. The AS degree allowed him to work as a draftsman during his later college years -- not the professional job that he wanted, but much better than working at McDonald's! He transferred his credits to a 4-year university and three years later graduated with an engineering degree. He says he never would've made it if he'd gone straight to the 4-year school.

Community college can be a GREAT CHOICE for the right person. Some people do it because they're not ready for a 4-year school, some do it to save money, some do it because they just don't think they can manage four more years of school or because their career aspirations only require an associate's degree.


There are lots of markets where the jobs compete; medical fields (nuclear tech, nursing), advertising and marketing, political science, criminal justice, education. I think CC can be an excellent choice, I just don't it's a waste of money and student loans to go right to a four year school, and I do think the quality of education (including price of tuition) can make a difference.

lchez
08-05-2006, 09:35 PM
Don't know if this will work now, but when I was in college in the 80's, many of my textbooks were in the library. I took them out and kept renewing. Give it a shot! Good luck!

dsanner106
08-05-2006, 11:48 PM
Whether one has a nursing degree from a community college or a top notch med school, they will have a job. Very little credence is paid to one over the other. Passing your boards, the same boards, puts you on a par.

D

dsanner106
08-06-2006, 12:07 AM
Here is the best way to go on textbooks, only buy up front books that are in short supply used, keep your receipt.
Go to class, get the syllabus and question the instructor as to what books you will actually work from in the course and need.
If you don't need the ones you purchased, return them, generally in the first 2 weeks of class for a full refund with receipt. Unless books are a part of tuition, you ARE allowed a refund within their written policy.
Also, ask the instructor if they will allow old editions of the text, that is where the big savings are.
Check prices at the bookstore and begin search online. If old editions allowed, you can save up to 90 percent.
If Professor ordered a package , ask if the extra materials are really necessary, if not, look for book alone online.
If the book is a new edition, and you must have it, you will not find it used or at significant discount online, just buy it at the store.
Buy any allowed old editions, or books without packaging online for the savings.
Take freight, and convenience of returns into account and buy online that which you are willing to be stuck with in a worst case scenario.

Very few college stores exist that are still owned by their schools or independantly, as the margins are very low. Text generally average 20-25 percent discount to the stores, while the operating cost margin of a college store is 27-28 percent. They generally lose money or break even on books and make their money on sweatshirts, notebooks, snacks etc. If your store offers efollet service, then your store is almost certainly OWNED by follet. A few major corporations have taken over most university stores, but don't change the names to show it. Publishers do control the market, issuing new editions every 2 years or so to kill off the used text on the market. Don't waste your time getting mad at the bookstore, try to get your professors to take costs into account when ordering their text.

D

AladdinJay
08-06-2006, 12:25 AM
Ah yes, gotta love the overpriced textbooks.

I am currently going into my senior year, and textbooks burn me every semester. One of my books cost $200 alone and then I had to get a $75 workbook. I'm so thankful I only have one more year of this ridicilous pricing!

What really stinks is that 95% of the books I cannot sell at the end of the year! And at one point I considered not even bothering getting them, but the professors made it part of the GRADE! It was like, 10% to have the text there each day! Insane!

tink2dw
08-06-2006, 01:01 AM
Here's One for the "Textbooks"!! :rotfl2:

1974 in AZ I buy a used copy of Stage Make-up Techniques, for $17.00. I use the book for the two semesters of the course. I didn't mark up my books.

Now Fast Forward to fall 2005. My Dd is taking Stage Make-up class. The College Book store ONLY has new copies priced at $120.00 I gasp!! I Say No Way!! And we look everywhere for online for the book. Nothing... It is no where to be found.

I dig out my old book show it to Dd, we laugh about the fact that my book is about 12 edition below the $120.00 version. I tell her why don't you take the book for laughs to class and show them the $17.00 receipt. Dd thinks it is a great idea! So she takes the book to class. The students are amazed at the price difference.

On the way out of Class the Instructor stops Dd to tell her that the only difference in the old edition and the new edition is colored pictures, that all the techniques are the same. She runs thru the chapter index and marks the chapters that she will be teaching from and she tell Dd that the older edition actually has easier pictures to work from!!

New book-$120.00
Old Book--$ 17.00
Savings---$103.00
A rip roaring laugh at the price of new books. Plus a bonding moment with Dd -- Priceless!!! :wizard: :wizard:

windycitymom
08-06-2006, 01:33 AM
Thank you for starting this thread! My firstborn ds leaves for college in two weeks and we need to get his books (not even sure if the list is posted yet). All this information is very helpful. We are paying for his books, so I'm sure he's not as concerned about the price as I am.

decaff38
08-06-2006, 08:47 AM
I am the OP and I have read this entire thread. I Forgot to state that 3 of the 4 texts prices ($ 74-107.50) were in the off campus bookstore and used. They did n't even have the new texts in yet. Can't imagine what that price will be. I bought the 105.00 for 39.95 w/ ship, 74.00 for 30.99w/ship and 107.20 for 40.00w/ship, I was prettty pleased with a total with other books of a $250.00 savings. My DD took her CNA courses through our community college and received her license before she graduated from HS and is now making $13.00 and working 3/4 time. She is now doing a 6 hr. night shift so she can study while she works. She opted for a 4 yr. RN program with the advice of her brother who is an RN. We are lucky that she will be staying at home and going to our local state school. She was a bit shocked about the tuition. I understood the amount but she is still confused with all the fees and charges. I like the state school system here in MN. Very high quality!! Next year she is looking into moving to a school in another town that has a great program too. She is my worry kid, so she felt she would do best getting one year over with Mom and Dad close. I don't mind having her here one more year. Even her 16 year old sister was a bit lonely without her when she moved in with 2 friends for the summer. Drifted off topic, sorry. Back to the books. I am willing to take my chances for a 40.00 mistake rather than a 170.00 book she never opens. These are the basic core classes not in her major. Best of luck with the book hunt!!!!Glad to help!!!

babiesX2
08-06-2006, 09:26 AM
Decaff38, I just remembered that my nursing texts weren't available for rental. We bought those at the off-campus used bookstore. Good luck to your daughter! :sunny: Thanks for all the advice for the rest of us! I really appreciate it.

Took
08-06-2006, 09:54 AM
Here's One for the "Textbooks"!! :rotfl2:

On the way out of Class the Instructor stops Dd to tell her that the only difference in the old edition and the new edition is colored pictures, that all the techniques are the same. She runs thru the chapter index and marks the chapters that she will be teaching from and she tell Dd that the older edition actually has easier pictures to work from!!

New book-$120.00
Old Book--$ 17.00
Savings---$103.00
A rip roaring laugh at the price of new books. Plus a bonding moment with Dd -- Priceless!!! :wizard: :wizard:


The key here is to ask the professor on day one or up front (I often receive emails from students before the semester starts). Sometimes the old edition works, sometimes not.

As a community college professor, I have always considered costs when selecting textbooks. Our students are often poor, and most of us who teach feel an obligation to help all we can. And, yes, occasionally, I have leant out a text, usually to a student who seemed to have very few resources or who has perhaps had his or her book stolen (it happens). I also only require texts that I will use in class or that students must use in addition to class in order to understand the material. "Optional" extra books are listed as such, although even these will be helpful if students actually use them (some don't seem to use the required ones much! LOL :rolleyes: ). I'm glad to have read this thread, as it reminds me again to be diligent in helping to control costs.

took

branv
08-06-2006, 10:14 AM
Kind of an OT complaint - I remember having at least 3 profs that required a stack of books, apart from the main textbook, that we were assigned to read maybe a few pages from (and weren't even on the tests).

Which is annoying, but you know what was REALLY annoying?

Realizing that one of those pricey virtually unused books was written by the professor! That sure is one way to boost your book sales :rolleyes:

MyZoeJane
08-06-2006, 10:51 AM
I didn't read the whole thread... so this may have already been suggested... but I NEVER go off the bookstore lists. Uh huh. No way.


I email the professor directly and ask nicely for the booklist and ISBN's. And I do it months before classes start. Not only can I be sure that I'm getting the correct books, but I can ask if other editions are acceptable, AND by the time class starts, my name already sticks out to the professor because I've already had contact with him or her in advance.

I'm especially happy when a professor realizes that there really isn't much difference between the 8th edition of Norton's Anthology of African American Literature and the 9th edition. The only difference is the scholarly articles in the back of the book and all you need is the MLA Bibliography to find those.

If you make your emails upbeat and personal, I think this is a great way to get your books AND introduce yourself to your professors. :thumbsup2

Plantlady
08-06-2006, 11:00 AM
My husband always uses the previous edition. He's never had problems, You can pick them up from amazon.com, for about $3. Also, as someone else mentioned, check the school library. He also uses this method.

Cindy B
08-06-2006, 11:03 AM
You can also get an interlibrary loan. Say your local library doesn't have it, you can ask the library to loan it from other libraries.

The loans are usually for two weeks, so that tides me over in case I ordered the books on Ebay and haven't received it yet.

mt2
08-06-2006, 12:05 PM
A couple times I had professors who'd require us to buy 2-3 books for ONE CLASS, yet when I looked over the syllabus I'd see that they only wanted us to read two chapters of this book and three chapters of that book -- THAT was when I really appreciated the reserve room!

I have had a friend or 2 that would make a copy of the chapters the instructor required from the reserve copy. This saved her a bunch of money. Her son was ill often when he was younger so money was tight.

If anything extra was required, I would let her make a copy of the page or 2 that would be needed.

What I didn't like is when the book I had to use was written by the instructor. This happened to me on at least 4 occassions. Pure profit for him.

A Mickeyfan
08-06-2006, 01:13 PM
::yes::

My school bookstore has books in packets, too, with a text and workbook or solution manual which seem to have a different ISBN number compared to when they are separate and listed on the bookstore website. :confused3

I have had a luck on half.com .
my son & daughter each have a class like that this semester..with the packet. I went to the publishers site & got the ISBN's that way & did a search for them. Seems when the packet has a CD for an online code..you can't get them on a resale... which really stinks! That code will get you onto the web site to do your work, the professor will grade it from there.. you will have no choice but to buy the packets new!! One of the professors I emailed to ask about it since my son had the book already (took the class last year & dropped it). Proff said NO... wanted the new edition packet ONLY...So I wasted the money on last years book.. now they are selling for like $8...and I paid $86 used!

I also want to ditto on half.com I got the best deals there & ebay..

A Mickeyfan
08-06-2006, 01:18 PM
I didn't read the whole thread... so this may have already been suggested... but I NEVER go off the bookstore lists. Uh huh. No way.


I email the professor directly and ask nicely for the booklist and ISBN's. And I do it months before classes start. Not only can I be sure that I'm getting the correct books, but I can ask if other editions are acceptable, AND by the time class starts, my name already sticks out to the professor because I've already had contact with him or her in advance.

I'm especially happy when a professor realizes that there really isn't much difference between the 8th edition of Norton's Anthology of African American Literature and the 9th edition. The only difference is the scholarly articles in the back of the book and all you need is the MLA Bibliography to find those.

If you make your emails upbeat and personal, I think this is a great way to get your books AND introduce yourself to your professors. :thumbsup2
I just did that with one of my son's Pf.. we have the 11edt.. already (actually my son dropped an entire semester last year due to health reasons and we have all his books).. The Ecom pf said yes, we can use the 11th even though he is saying to get the 12th.. it will be fine, it was the Math prof that was not very nice about it... so we are stuck getting that one.. That is the only one we had to get for him. My DD starts this year & she is using some of his old ones as well, but did have to get other for her.. The only one we got in the school store was the one with the packet.. we needed new due to the access code... just another way for them to make money!! I think if you buy the book.. you should have a code free :confused3 even used books run nearly $100 at times.

RangerPooh
08-06-2006, 03:48 PM
The packets can be frustrating! I have had to purchase too many "texts" that were just loose papers with 3-hole punches. Absolutely no resale value there which stinks! So somewhere I have a chemestry "text" and an econ "text" just sitting there with no use. I have to agree with the text written by a professor and the required purchase of it. It's very frustrating! I had that last fall as one of the requirements for my econ class. And it was another one of those loose "texts".

Here's another tip. Our school, Washington State University, has auctions every few months. This past month we went through their selection of used textbooks and found a few "keepers". DH is an Anthro/Archeo major so any books that might serve as supplimental we generally pick up, esp at $1. a book. We also found a few geography and Env. Science texts (again, part of his requirement) that he will be required to purchase for upcoming classes, yet in the previous edition. Once again $1 a book. Not bad! Also, as an education major I was able to find a ton of elementray school (primary grade) activity books that I can use as supplimental assignemnts in class. All texts were $1 at the sale so we bought a few. So while I might have strayed, the point that I am trying to make is to check any local school surplus sales. You might find a few of the previous editions at a bargain price.

PS. DH found one of the "loose" econ texts (unfortunately he's taking a different class than mine) that sells for $60 and picked it up for $1. The same packet is required this year as was the one from last year, the only change is the date. So why pay the additional $59?

robinb
08-06-2006, 04:05 PM
Amazon.com is also a great place to buy textbooks. I sell them on Amazon and I have also bought some on Amazon too.

Here are my recommendations:
* Pay the little extra for expedited shipping as Amazon's standard shipping can take as long as 3 weeks! On Amazon it's only $2 more and you'll get your book a lot faster.
* Read the description of the book carefully to make sure it's the correct edition. Many unscrupulous sellers on Amazon will sell a previous version of the textbooks under the wrong ISBN.
* If you don't want highlighting or underlining, select a copy in "Very Good" condition or better. A copy in "Good" condition can be marked up and the seller is not required to tell you.
* Pick a seller with a high rating (I pick a 95% positive or better) and read their feedback to see if people are happy.

wtpntigger2
08-06-2006, 04:40 PM
This summer I took a children's lit grad class that was only a week long. My peers who took it last summer said don't bothering buying the text as they only opened it once and there was no readings from it. I am so glad I took their advice. The text was $100 new (no used available) and we "used" the text twice; the first time was to look at a sidebox with seven questions in it to determine if the book we brought to class was considered good child lit and the other was to do a picture walk of the text and then nothing was even discussed about it. The kicker: there is a new edition so the bookstore didn't buy the text back.

I have yet to buy any of my texts from the school bookstore (which is run by Barnes & Nobles). I have saved hundreds of dollars over the last year buying my texts online.

dsanner106
08-06-2006, 07:24 PM
Very good ideas, everyone. Just a few pointers though, don't let anyone know or let the professor see that you are photocopying someone elses book. It is illegal, and many faculty take it very seriously. Most text are written by faculty somewhere, and sometimes they will choose to look out for one another. Generally books written by faculty don't generate real income for them unless they self publish and force the bookstore to sell them. The most I know a basic author of text to make was less than 5000.00 total for 4 years work. 90% though make no-where near that, and don't make any extra for individual copies sold. They write them and use them because it is required to make tenure in all university systems I am aware of. By all means communicate with your professor first about what editions they will allow, that is the biggest way to save money.
Another point, generally used books are 25% off the new price. The bookstore will pay 50% of the NEW price regardless of how you bought it IF they need it to re-sell. You get 66% back on used books if your prof doesn't change or a new edition come out. Always buy used if you have to have the current editions, and sell the first day of buyback if you can to avoid the bookstore filling it's need for the next term. If they don't want it, or offer to buy it for the wholesaler at too low a price, then sell online if the book is not being used on your campus, or if it is, post it for sale on school boards.

D

Free4Life11
08-06-2006, 11:33 PM
Realizing that one of those pricey virtually unused books was written by the professor! That sure is one way to boost your book sales :rolleyes:

I hear that. I went to a school for a year and all incoming freshman were required to buy a brand new career management book. Yep, it was written by the wife of the university president. :rolleyes: And you could NOT sell the book back, you had to buy a brand new one.

Belle5
08-06-2006, 11:51 PM
I email the professor directly and ask nicely for the booklist and ISBN's. And I do it months before classes start. Not only can I be sure that I'm getting the correct books, but I can ask if other editions are acceptable, AND by the time class starts, my name already sticks out to the professor because I've already had contact with him or her in advance.

If you make your emails upbeat and personal, I think this is a great way to get your books AND introduce yourself to your professors. :thumbsup2

Well, I am trying your advice. I had both sons email their professors today telling them they are looking forward to their classes and could they tell them the edition of the texts they need and/or the ISBN of the text. I am hoping they respond!

decaff38
08-07-2006, 08:21 AM
You can go to the college bookstore and write down all the info for the books from the tag on the shelf. You can then look at the cover appearance and know what the book looks like. Good luck with your search.

Belle5
08-10-2006, 01:10 PM
Uh-oh! I just purchase a used (online) Microeconomics text book with DVD for my son. It just arrived and the DVD is enclosed in a carboard envelope that says, "Paul Solman Videos on DVD and access to DiscoverEcon--available only with a NEW book" On the front it shows an example of the person using this DVD signs in with their name and instructor's name, etc. I am concerned that since this has been used already it is coded in some way that my son won't have access to the information he needs (he will be blocked). Does anyone have any experience with this? I would think that if the seller knew the DVD would be useless to another user they would not have marketed as a texbook plus DVD... Obviously I paid a lot more for this book because it was listed as "DVD included".

pjlla
08-11-2006, 11:24 AM
I don't have time to read all of the responses, but DH found that most of the time the "required" books were written by the professor of the class! Even if the books were never used during the semester, they were still "required"!..............P

apirateslifeforme
08-11-2006, 11:40 AM
My mother just went back to school to be a medical assistant...for 7 classes of books and equipment (stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, 2 sets of scrubs, etc.) it came to almost $1,000. Luckily, as a displaced worker returning to school (her company closed last year), the state paid for her education, but still...whoa.

bedgraynexl
08-11-2006, 01:19 PM
I too am going through this, returning to grad school 8 years after getting my bachelors. I kinda go both ways on this. First, 6 months before I decide to go back, DW and I have a garage sale, figuring to get get rid of some old books. Sold a bunch of them that had been collecting dust or sitting in boxes. Fast forward six months and my book list had some of the books I had just sold. Probably not the same editions, but frustrating anyway.

Fortunately I did find one box of books that had two required texts (same editions too) At least I dont have to buy a couple this semester.

Free4Life11
08-11-2006, 01:39 PM
Uh-oh! I just purchase a used (online) Microeconomics text book with DVD for my son. It just arrived and the DVD is enclosed in a carboard envelope that says, "Paul Solman Videos on DVD and access to DiscoverEcon--available only with a NEW book" On the front it shows an example of the person using this DVD signs in with their name and instructor's name, etc. I am concerned that since this has been used already it is coded in some way that my son won't have access to the information he needs (he will be blocked). Does anyone have any experience with this? I would think that if the seller knew the DVD would be useless to another user they would not have marketed as a texbook plus DVD... Obviously I paid a lot more for this book because it was listed as "DVD included".

I had that exact same book. We never used the DVD's. They are just visual learning tools -- all of the same info is in the book. I bought a used book and the DVD came with it.

decaff38
08-12-2006, 10:22 AM
i'm the OP and we received the first of the books yesterday. Perfect condition, exactly as the ones on the bookstore shelf. So far saved 50.00. I figure there will be at least one glitch but am very willing to take that chance to save 300.00 on books. Even anxiety ridden daughter was okay with them. I'll let you know how it all comes out!!

windycitymom
08-12-2006, 11:35 AM
My son is an incoming Freshman and we take him to college NEXT SATURDAY!.

Anyway, I ordered his Calculus book on Ebay. The school is selling it new for $148 (used $111); I bought it new on Ebay for $69 (include shipping). I received an email that the seller would mail it priority mail on Sat. and I would have it before Friday.

I also ordered a Chemical Principles book from Amazon. New at the schook is cost $152. I ordered a new book from Amazon for $72.

If this works out, I will save more than 50% on the cost of two books. Paying $141 (for new) instead of $300 (new at the school). :cheer2:

However, his Italian 101 instructor has a "new,customized book" that you can only buy at the school for $114. :sad2:

I emailed his instructors and only one got back to me. He told me to go ahead and buy it, and asked me for the link.

decaff38
08-12-2006, 05:43 PM
OP again ! Received 2 more texts today. Both exactly what she needed and saved about 100.00 + 80.00 = 180.00 so far. Thrilled!!!! Ordered on 8/5 and received on 8/12 Amazing!!!

dsanner106
08-12-2006, 05:53 PM
I just wanted to say again, always try to talk with the professor before buying the book, or looking over the syllabus to see if the books are on there before buying them. If a prof is teaching a basic course, the school wants a book list showing materials covering all the topics the prof is required to cover in the course. The teacher may be just planning to lecture on a particular subject, but if it is one of the required ones, he still has to put a book on the syllabus covering the topic. If a student misses half the classes due to illness, etc, this gives them the means to read and pass the class. If you plan to be there for lectures you may not need some of the "required" books on the list.

D

Belle5
08-20-2006, 07:53 AM
Any half.com experts out there? I ordered a Calculus text for my son (hardback 2005) and after the order went through the seller contacted me asking if I still wanted it since it's the soft cover international version. I don't want to debate international versions--I just knew I wanted the hardback US version. I told him to cancel the transaction--I didn't want it. When I did not hear back from him I sent another email asking for confirmation that the order has indeed been cancelled. How can I know if it has been cancelled? The used book was $100 and I have already purchased another through Amazon since we are in a time crunch with classes starting. Half.com has sent me at least 20 order confirmations (auto generated) and no cancelled notification. How should I proceed? Thanks for any advice ahead of time!

Belle5

Cindy B
08-20-2006, 09:26 AM
Uh-oh! I just purchase a used (online) Microeconomics text book with DVD for my son. It just arrived and the DVD is enclosed in a carboard envelope that says, "Paul Solman Videos on DVD and access to DiscoverEcon--available only with a NEW book" On the front it shows an example of the person using this DVD signs in with their name and instructor's name, etc. I am concerned that since this has been used already it is coded in some way that my son won't have access to the information he needs (he will be blocked). Does anyone have any experience with this? I would think that if the seller knew the DVD would be useless to another user they would not have marketed as a texbook plus DVD... Obviously I paid a lot more for this book because it was listed as "DVD included".

Yes, you got duped. My DH cant sell his Micro text (he just finished this summer) because of this CD code thing. If you are certain that the prof only needs the text you will be ok.

Some schools have a School ID /code to access the online homework features. Sometimes the instructor has an extra acess code.

heartsy77
08-20-2006, 10:03 AM
My college insisted we have all new editions for all my classes except one! The worse part most of these books are paper back! I am taking four classes and it came to over 300 for paper books. My health book is printed exclusively for my college and contains workbooks and a journal, which means you have to buy it at the college bookstore! I pay for all my own books, and I know I got ripped however; I don't see that there is anything I can do about it.

brivers222
08-20-2006, 10:17 AM
I get the ISBN's from my teachers and buy them from Alternate Sources... Usually half.com or BN.com or Amazon.com for a fraction of the cost... Oh and then resell on E-bay to make up almost ALL of the money I originally spent.

Granted to resell at such high price (in relationship to buy back price) I don't place a single mark in them... Stick notes, if I want to make notes on the pages.

Doesn't matter any more though, can wash my hands clean of over paying for college classes all around... I just finished up my FINAL CLASS AT Eastern Michigan! I am now an alumni!!! Bachelors of Computer Aided Design!

Kellydelly
08-20-2006, 11:17 AM
Yes, you got duped. My DH cant sell his Micro text (he just finished this summer) because of this CD code thing. If you are certain that the prof only needs the text you will be ok.

Some schools have a School ID /code to access the online homework features. Sometimes the instructor has an extra acess code.


Did you actually try to use the disk? If your son's college bookstore sells this text with the cd used, then you should be able to use the disk more than once. I bought a used nutrition textbook that came with software and was able to use the disk :confused3 . I just bought a lab text I need on ebay and it doesn't come with the software that the school store includes with it (I've not actually seen anyone sell it even new with any software besides my school store). I'm hoping I can just borrow someone's disk if I actually end up needing it.

Cindy B
08-20-2006, 12:39 PM
Did you actually try to use the disk? If your son's college bookstore sells this text with the cd used, then you should be able to use the disk more than once. I bought a used nutrition textbook that came with software and was able to use the disk :confused3 . I just bought a lab text I need on ebay and it doesn't come with the software that the school store includes with it (I've not actually seen anyone sell it even new with any software besides my school store). I'm hoping I can just borrow someone's disk if I actually end up needing it.

Yes the disk had an access code when you entered the CD (like a Microsoft prdouct code).

The instructor emailed the access code to all students, and it was a one time licensing fee/access code specific with all students names embedded in the access code...

So now, the info can not be given unless you have the code.

dsanner106
08-20-2006, 02:17 PM
Unfortunately, the publishers are trying all sorts of things to dry up the used book market and discs and codes are a part of the effort. You may be able to get a code through the instructor, or you may not, but try.

Drew

LilyWDW
08-20-2006, 03:25 PM
Didn't read this all because I have heard it all before. You see, I am a student worker at my on campus bookstore and I have been there for over 4 years now. While some of this may have been brought up, I decided to make a list to describe many of the reasons for the prices of textbooks, esp if you buy ON campus...

1) The bookstores have to base thier prices off of publishers cost and then their own markups. Often their markup is actually decided BY the university because the school gets a percentage of the purchase of each book.

2) New editions are always coming out and often there is little to no way for a store to get enough copies of the old one to provide, thus forcing them into the new edition. These books are OEOP- old edition/out of print. If you can not provide enough copies to cover a certien percentage of enrollment for that class, you can not use that book

3) Packages are the bane of everyone, trust me. Often it is due to the publisher, who insists there is no other way to ship the book and the stores hands are tied. Sometimes the department/instructor INSISTS on the package and the stores hands are tied.

4) Software that is passworded. You can not use some software more then once due to this. Once the code is used, it is set to that person's account. So, if the software is required for the class, then it has to be a new one that is sold to the student. Otherwise the student may be unable to access exams/homework or other items required for their class.

5) Custom editions flat out suck. This has been an issue at my school this semester. It seems more and more departments want a custom book, either printed by the school or a package/printing that is custom done by the publisher for the school. These really are the worse thing to man, because the odds of used are so small (stores can't bring in copies from other schools/many are loose leaf and can't be bought back), the returns are very strict with them, and buybacks are not that great.

Even after saying all of this, I would suggest going to an offsite bookstore to get your books. I refuse to buy online because I can not check the quality of the book then and there and I can not be 100% sure it will show on time. Often an off campus store will have lower prices because they don't have to worry about issues like #1. I shop at an off campus store for my books, because even with my discount their books come out cheaper. :cheer2:

However, I just ask people to not take it out on the employees of the bookstore you are at. The cashiers and CS associates really have NO say in the selling price of a book or what happens at buyback. I have had people throw books :scared1: at me and have had to call campus police due to being threatened by someone when I could not buy back thier book. So please, I know how you feel, so don't take it out on me :guilty: