PDA

View Full Version : Gay-Friendly Bishop


Viki
05-06-2006, 04:33 PM
Hi, friends, I just wanted to share that I just got back from two days of synod assembly and we elected the most gay-friendly Bishop - and our first woman - that I can imagine. I am soooo psyched. She is terrific is many ways, but this is the icing on the cake. Now I'm gonna crash, because I have to work tomorrow!

TuckandStuiesMom
05-07-2006, 07:32 AM
Exclusionary practices (on any basis) by church doctrine and hierarchy is a concept/problem that I personally struggle with. Are some of us "made less in <his> image" than others? As I type this, I realize I'm even somewhat uncomfortable with the <his> word. :rolleyes1

It is my belief that as soon as we start looking at "others" as being in some way different and less deserving, we are on a pretty slippery slope. Viki -- I'm sure you would know this -- Was it Dietrich Bonhoeffer who wrote the famous essay about "when they came for the jews, I said nothing because..."

It's great that your Bishop is accepting and gay-friendly. Change the heart (people) and then the head (doctrine) will follow.

As I type this, the sun has just come up and the sky outside is a beautiful mosaic of palest blue and peach. If that's not a sign that our heavenly <Mother> loves us in spite of ourselves, I don't know what is.

OrlandoMike
05-07-2006, 07:45 AM
" In Germany they first came for the communists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew. Then they came for the trade unionists, and I didn't speak up because I wasn't a trade unionist. Then they came for the Catholics, and i didn't speak up because I was a protestant. Then they came for me - and by that time no one was left to speak up."

Pastor Martin Niemoller

TuckandStuiesMom
05-07-2006, 08:02 AM
Martin Niemöller and although there is some dispute of the order of the subsequent stanzas/paragraphs, he apparently cited the communists first.

And it is interesting that as anti-semitic as he arguably was, he still included the jews in his poem (Up to now, I had always thought it was an essay)

Als die Nazis die Kommunisten holten,
habe ich geschwiegen;
ich war ja kein Kommunist.

Als sie die Sozialdemokraten einsperrten,
habe ich geschwiegen;
ich war ja kein Sozialdemokrat.

Als sie die Gewerkschafter holten,
habe ich nicht protestiert;
ich war ja kein Gewerkschafter.

Als sie die Juden holten,
habe ich nicht protestiert;
ich war ja kein Jude.

Als sie mich holten,
gab es keinen mehr, der protestieren konnte.

How OFF-TOPIC is this for the DIS boards ?!?!? and how do I always seem to end up somewhere off in the deep weeds?!?!?!? :crazy: Now.. How 'bout it? Anybody got updates on fast-passes for EE???? or How's the pot-roast at the Liberty Tavern????

OrlandoMike
05-07-2006, 08:04 AM
Get there early!

Any Yummy!

TuckandStuiesMom
05-07-2006, 08:08 AM
Thanks for the correct attribution.
After my initial post, I did a little looking around on the subject and was totally fascinated by what I found. I re-posted before I saw your correction. I apologize for not checking to see if somebody beat me to it.

OrlandoMike
05-07-2006, 08:10 AM
If your talking about the "stanza" I simply looked on my wall and typed, have a version of this framed and on the wall as a reminder.......

It includes all of the triangles and what they stood for.

TuckandStuiesMom
05-07-2006, 08:27 AM
Since, I really didn't know very much about this poem after all (wrong attribution and initially thought it was an essay) ...

What are the triangles and what do they symbolize?

OrlandoMike
05-07-2006, 09:41 AM
Yellow on Yellow (Star of David) = Jews
Black on Yellow = Mental Disorders
Red = German Political Prisoners
Brown = Gypseys
Black = Asocial Prisoners and Lesbians (Geesh girls get a new color!)
Red with black circle below = Jehova Witnesses
Pink = Homosexuals ( I am guessing men only because of above)
Blue = Emigres

Thats what I have at least.

TuckandStuiesMom
05-07-2006, 12:15 PM
...the badges they were forced to wear on their clothes.

I was hoping for something uplifting.

Kinda like "Amazing Grace" being written by a former slaver who had seen the light. (I'm still digesting some other quotes from Martin Niemöller that I read this morning and honestly, I don't know what I think about this poem now. In the past, it had seemed like a voice of enlightened bravery in an incredibly dark time. Now, it seems more like enlightened self-interest.) I hope I'm wrong. Any theologians care to weigh in?