PDA

View Full Version : HELP! Gastric Bypass? Betty Ford Clinic for Obesity?


jonestavern
04-26-2006, 11:44 PM
Well, having fallen off the diet wagon yet again & facing life-threatening obesity, I am contemplating some sort of by-pass surgery.

It is just so depressing for me. I have a great idea on just how painful it will be, having had a C-section & hysterectomy.
Our insurance will cover very little of the surgery & at a time when DS17 is getting ready to go to college & we are remodelling our very old house--well, not a good thing--

I would really rather loose the weight 'naturally' but just can't keep it off. I am an emotional/bored eater & it is, literally, going to kill me.

I would love to find a 'spa' where I could go to straighten this out. Something like a Betty Ford Clinic for the food addicted. does anyone out there know of such a place?

should I just 'take the plunge' & get surgery? I am so afraid I will 'eat through it'--I am an excellent cook & it will mean giving that up

I would appreciate anyone's experiences to help me sort through this

Jean

Chickysmom
04-27-2006, 12:29 AM
Although I am very new to this section of the boards, I have been around DIS for a while. I would be happy to discuss the option of bypass surgery with you if you need. Yes, I had it done. Yes it worked for me. Many surprises I never thought of prior to surgery. Paid for it all myself. I'd be happy to share more detailed info with anyone needing it....no 8 X 10 glossies however! LOL I'll be as hoest as you'd like, and as not graphic as you need....let me know!

Chickysmom
04-27-2006, 12:36 AM
Oh, and I'd be happy to discuss things in provate if that would be more comfortable too....for anyone thinking of this surgery. An open forum or private....sorry I don't know of any "spas" but it sure would be nice to see something like the Biggest Loser more readily available for the average person! A little friendly competition would help you keep on the straight and narrow!

jonestavern
04-28-2006, 07:30 PM
thank you for the quick reply!
I would have posted sooner but due to a throat problem I made a a trip the the emergency room & they ended up keeping me over night--I am okay :sunny:

I am perfectly fine now, but have been poked, prodded, x-rayed, photographed & treadmilled to infinity! :rolleyes: :teeth:

I did ask nurses about gastric bypass & they had only glowing stories.
I am still skeptical--
it is a radical lifestyle change for me. cooking is a big part of my life (I went to culinary school, worked in restaurants, did some catering & had my own cake decorating small business). My understanding is one can only have 6 very small meals & those are severely restricted in regards to fats intake, sugars etc. Please put in your info if I am way off track here.
Well, not much different than dieting, only I'd be far less inclined to cheat if I were doomed to suffer the nasty GI consequences ! :rotfl:

I also understand there are many different methods of gastric by-pass
& the pluses & minuses of these confuse me terribly

I did find one medical 'spa' that treats obesity:
http://www.structurehouse.com/

they appear to be reputeable, but catch the prices! If I fall off the wagon that is $8,000 for 4 weeks--not much for one of those chi-chi spas ($5,000 per week) but...Hey, that's a lot of DVC points! of course if I don't do something soon, the second wife will be the one to enjoy those points!

well, I am going to have to come to a decision soon
thoughtful input here would be welcome :teeth:

thanks!
Jean

Chickysmom
04-28-2006, 09:43 PM
I found a lot of answers to many questions about the different surgeries on obesityhelp.com. A very informative site.

PM me if you would like more details of my own personal experiences with the procedure. I will be two years post-op in July.

Zoesmama03
04-30-2006, 03:22 PM
I think either way the cost is going to be A LOT.. I've seen some things about those clinics/spas but always saw the price to be HUGE.


Have you tried seeing a dietician or maybe have hubby do shopping and not buy things that you could sabatoge on. Won't work if he isn't following something similar as he would buy the foods.

emotional and bored eating is hard to break. Maybe try starting a new hobby that will fill your time. Or join a local zoo or botanical garden and take walks a couple times a week through them. Keeps you exercising and away from the food at home.


I remember reading in Dr. Phils book on this kind of eating and ways to avoid it. Like revising your driving routes to bypass fast food places and such.

jonestavern
04-30-2006, 03:51 PM
I do know how to eat healthy--Mom was a stickler for nutrition ;)
I think most overweight folks actually know very well what to do, we just don't do it~I would do just fine if I had someone to cook for me & I didn't have to SEE the inside of a kitchen. I do think all the stress of living in a constant remodelling zone for the past 5 years (another thread, but oh, yes, 5 years! :scared1: ) is simply killing me.

I volunteer where I am on my fat little feet most of the day & involved with phone work, scheduling, research etc. I think it adds up to about 500+ hours yearly. DH would like my new hobby to be--ta da!--housecleaning! :rotfl2:

When I was on Atkins & losing weight, DH was on, also. But he's maybe 10 lbs overweight, can eat like a horse & eat junk :teeth: Talk about a difference in metabolism!
Once we were both working doing kitchen duty for a charity function, I unexpectedly came around the corner I caught DH woofing down a small pan of brownies! :rolleyes:

Thank goodness DS17 is not overweight!

Jean

KathyFP
05-01-2006, 07:00 AM
I can share my surgery experience with you if you are interested. It was only partially success. It will be five years in October.

curiouser
05-01-2006, 08:37 AM
Have you thought about finding a medical office that combines a nutritionist with a psychologist, or perhaps finding your local chapter of Overeaters Anonymous? Emotional/bored eating is a psychological thing, and though surgery will help your weight, it won't fix those response triggers of eating when bored/upset/stressed, etc...

Not to disuade you against surgery, if that's what you want, but I think you need to look at treating all aspects of your problems. OA might be a great place to start to meet people just like you struggling with the same issues! Good luck!!!

jonestavern
05-01-2006, 11:59 AM
Have you thought about finding a medical office that combines a nutritionist with a psychologist, or perhaps finding your local chapter of Overeaters Anonymous? Emotional/bored eating is a psychological thing, and though surgery will help your weight, it won't fix those response triggers of eating when bored/upset/stressed, etc...

Not to disuade you against surgery, if that's what you want, but I think you need to look at treating all aspects of your problems. OA might be a great place to start to meet people just like you struggling with the same issues! Good luck!!!

Yes, I have been seeking psychological help for this problem for over 20 years ( I should add I had a period of 'normal' weight from the ages of 18 to 36) I have tried several therapists, but while they were very helpful in other areas never seemed to connect regarding the weight issues. Unfortunately, some of the prescriptions for depression really added to the weight 'thing'!

You're right, I will look into OA. :idea: Thanks :cheer2: for that very helpful reminder. I think surgery or not, that is something I'll just have to stick to for the rest of my life.

Jean

jonestavern
05-01-2006, 01:55 PM
I can share my surgery experience with you if you are interested. It was only partially success. It will be five years in October.

thank you for your generous offer to share :goodvibes
I have PMed you

Jean

Greenepona
05-02-2006, 12:35 AM
My dad and one of my friends had the surgery...
They both said it was worth it.
My dad went in at 350lbs 5'11" and is now like 200lbs
My friend went in at 411lbs 5'5" and is now 150ish

very drastic. There are drawbacks, but they both said you will learn very quickly to stay on the straight path.....

I think is an option when all else fails. If my dieting and excercise dont go well( if i really stick to it and dont lose) i will consider the surgery. I am 5' and weigh 270lbs.

canwegosoon
05-03-2006, 06:57 AM
I was approved, and then lost 40 lbs, now no longer able to have surgery but need to loose the additional 60 on my own....I have to say from someone who also faces daily weight problems, cleaning out the house, and making substution choices, staying toward a vegetarian/protien diet(for me), and keeping busy is the only thing that makes a difference. You could spend thousands at weight clinics, but come home and face the same problems. I wish you all the best - Please discuss your options with a doctor(specialist) and good luck.

DiznEeyore
05-03-2006, 07:54 AM
I just wanted to add the perspective that my cousin has shared with us. Not to necessarily dissuade you, but to give you another's point of view.

He had the surgery and while he's lost a significant amount of weight, he's said numerous times that if he'd known what the actual surgery and even moreso the recovery would entail, he would not have opted to have it done. He didn't experience horrible complications, but just ongoing things. And he's fully aware that even if you have the surgery, you can gain the weight back (Randy Jackson on American Idol is just one example). He says he wishes he would've just trained himself to eat the way he has to now before having the surgery. Then he could still eat "real" food and not have to do all the supplements, etc.

I wish you good luck and good health whichever way you go! :goodvibes

jonestavern
05-04-2006, 01:45 PM
Thanks for all the input! :sunny:

Last Wednesday I was admitted to the hospital because my throat was constricting. One thing led to the other & before I knew it I was being IV'ed, prodded, cat-scanned, stress-tested, X-rayed & just about everything except being coaxed back into swimming out to sea! :teeth:

The ticker seems to be fit & fine (!) but I need further tests for esophogeal--okay, this has to be misspelled!--problems.
Personally, this didn't start until I put back on the weight I'd lost, so I think the flab is the main cause. Believe it or not my BP is usually normal (it wasn't in the ER though! :p ), I don't have diabetes(bet that's just a matter of time if my ways don't change) & my cholestorol levels are healthy.
On the other hand my normal weight, handsome DH has elevated cholestorols & elevated BP.

While there for the couple of days, nurses & Drs kept telling me glowing stories of how very reliable laproscopic bypass surgery is.
I was told by 2 Drs that I am a good canidate.
That aside, I think I need to find out from others who've gone through the procedure.

so has anyone had the bypass done via laproscope?

Another idea was to hire a personal trainer to come to the house. This could be a little interesting as we live in 'the sticks'.

Jean

Chickysmom
05-05-2006, 04:19 PM
I think that having the gastric bypass done via "open" or "laproscopic" is the same surgery...just through a cut or holes.

My stats are were all really good prior to my surgery as well and you should see them now! I am asked each time I go to a dr (very very rarely) what meds I am on or that I forgot to list them. I tell them I am not on any and they reply that they have never seems counts and numbers this good without meds being involved!

Guess I am just lucky with that and that those numbers were so very good when very overweight as well....

plove53
05-06-2006, 10:12 PM
both laparoscopic and open rny bypass do the same thing internally, but different risks with the operation due to different techniques. there are other types of bypass that also include reduced nutrient absorbtion, but most docs wont do those now because patients often get nutrient deficiencies and have to take vitamin shots for the rest of their lives. phil, my DBF, has the laparoscopic bypass 5-25-05, and in just under a year has lost 210 lbs, with under 100 left to go! the laparoscopic has reduced risk of infection because of smaller incisions, and the hospitalization time is 3 days on average as compared to over a week. phil did have some complications during the surgury and a post-op infection, but is doing great now. one think you need to realize is that it is not an easy way to lose weight. you need to meticulously measure your food, moniter your protien intake to be sure you get enough, cut ur food into tiny bites and eat verrry slowly especially at first, resist the cravings u still will get, etc. plus, you will need to exercise, especially since your metabolism will start to slow from lack of food, and exercise will help speed it up. i think the surgury overall was a great thing for him, but tough, not the easy way out that many think it is. if you want more info, pm us and i will tell u, and if its something i cant answer i will get phil to tell u (i hijacked his username, lol)

good luck!

DVCkidsMOM
05-07-2006, 10:57 AM
Another idea was to hire a personal trainer to come to the house. This could be a little interesting as we live in 'the sticks'.

Jean

I am also in the sticks and it does add challenges - I can't just pop into the gym when it's 20 miles away and now with gas prices I don't go to town more than twice a week. It's as hot and humid type miserable here as it may be cold and miserable there, nobody's dog is on a leash and to get anywhere required being on a highway - so it's hard to exercise outside. I am going to get this room cleaned up enough that I can do an exercise video while I'm checking AP discount codes which have got me into a new up before dawn habit. Kids can bike with me for a small distance before we get to dangerous dogs and I do mall walk on my definite "into town day."

Emotional Eating - this (and the people I know who've had it, lost weight then regained it) is why I won't consider surgery. I figure my emotional eating won't change until my way of handling my emotions changes. :rolleyes2 I've really enjoyed reading some of the books by Geneen Roth, an expert on emotional eating. I'm now trying to find immediate release activities that I enjoy, like dancing to an 80's party tune; and I'm trying to figure out what I enjoy on a regular basis to renew my batteries, like crafting. I'm also spending more fun time with my kids, so that our time together isn't always about school and chores. These are things that I hope will help me to turn to things other than food.
WRT dieting, BF has asked me to try SB and I'm starting that. Basically opposed to dieting, but I've now reached a point where I'm finally more opposed to the weight than I am to the diet.
Good luck no matter what your decision, but I would recommend Geneen Roth. :thumbsup2 Now I need to search on OE Anonymous for myself - maybe there's one near me.

JJClemson
05-07-2006, 11:26 AM
Have you thought about finding a medical office that combines a nutritionist with a psychologist, or perhaps finding your local chapter of Overeaters Anonymous? Emotional/bored eating is a psychological thing, and though surgery will help your weight, it won't fix those response triggers of eating when bored/upset/stressed, etc...

Not to disuade you against surgery, if that's what you want, but I think you need to look at treating all aspects of your problems. OA might be a great place to start to meet people just like you struggling with the same issues! Good luck!!!


I could not agree more... I know you said you have been seeking psychological help, but are you working with a psychologist who speacializes with emotional overeating? I would HIGHLY suggest that. I know depression meds do add on weight by increasing your appetite, but psychologists who specialize with emotional overeating are also trained to do that.

I would strongly advise against the surgery. The weight can come back if you do not fix the underlying problem. My father has dealt w/ emotional overeating for about 30 years and he was about to have the surgery. This was the same time I was starting my Master's in Public Health. I found too much info about the harmful side-effects of the surgery and the fact that it doesn't last. I persuaded my father not to have the surgery. He had been seeing a psychologist and psychiatrist for 30 years. He now sees a psychologist who specializes im emotional eating and I serve as his nutritionist. It has only been a year but he has lost a lot of weight (he is still considered obese but at the lower end BMI= 30.5) and he has learned how to control his appetite. He does not work out, but plans on starting this summer.

As for not being able to cook anymore, trust me, you can still cook and bake and eat tons of yummy foods by modifying some ingredients. Or you could just have smaller portions of the foods you are already making.

PM me if you want info on my dad's plan.

Best of luck to you!

Jen

patsal
05-10-2006, 03:57 PM
I just wanted to chime in and wish you luck with your decision. After contemplating it, I decided to try one more diet faithfully--this time I know I have to take it off and keep it off or I will be treading in very dangerous territory. I have given myself a full year to take off a bit more than 50% of what I need to. I have kept the idea of bariatric surgery very alive if I am unsuccessful--the thought of such a drastic lifestyle change is something that i don't think I could bear--DH (great metabolism) is a foodie and I dont' think he would adapt to my new lifestyle well nor would I be inclined to keep cooking great food if I could not eat. The way I figure it if it becomes a life or death thing I of course would get the surgery, but I just want to try with 100% no cheat/exercise everyday first. Best wishes to you whatever you choose, I know it isn't easy!

jonestavern
05-11-2006, 12:05 PM
I went to the Dr on Tuesday & he thought the bypass would not be a good decision in view of my emotional overeating. He is not an obesity expert & couldn't immediately refer me to any, but is looking into it.
I am taking tranquilizers again. The last 6 months it's as if I am compulsed to eat & it scares the heck out of me.
I have bought a glider--low impact on the knees--& have been using it for about a month now, but can only do 5 minutes before I get winded. Will add on 2 minutes more per week. Would like to get Pilates or Total Body Gym--personally a combination of the two would work best--but we'll see.
Have found an OA meeting within reasonable distance of our home so will begin meetings next week.
Have had a 'bug' for the past four days so am on a diet! :teeth:
I plan to do a very lean diet--watching carbs & calories until I can reach a more informed decision. I do plan to seek out an obesity expert.
Yes, I have read the Roth books. I will re-read Potatoes & Prozac
which is on my bookshelf. As I re-call, the 1st time I read it, found it interesting but couldn't identify with much. Perhaps, I wasn't as receptive? I will read again, begining this evening-

Thanks!
Jean

JJClemson
05-11-2006, 05:03 PM
Hi Jean, I just wanted to wish you good luck! Keep up the good work :thumbsup2 It sounds like you are ready to take control of this, and you are going about this in a very smart way (w/ all the expert help, OA, etc.) Once again, best of luck to you! I will be cheering you on :cheer2: :cheer2: :cheer2:


Jen

DVCkidsMOM
05-14-2006, 07:00 AM
When Food is Love is the Roth book that I got from my library that had some helpful ideas in it. My library also has one on by Roth on compulsive eating called Feeding the Hungry Heart, but I can't personally recommend it or the one you have as I've not read them. I'm not willing to travel to my nearest OE meeting but let us know what you think of them. Perhaps I'll decide that 25 miles each way is worth it? Sounds like you're on the right track - good for you!