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JuneChickie
04-20-2006, 05:38 PM
Do you or anyone you know that has a gone to college and finished
with a degree make 50 thousand or less ? **********

While going to college ,,,, we all acknowledge does give us a better
chance at the better paying jobs ,,, it does not guarantee that.

I know several people in "store" management that only make 30 to 45 thousand a year. All have college degrees in "business" mgnt. and yes
I'm sure there are others who make way more. But the point is
there are people with degrees who make less than 50 thou. a year.

I also know Hallmark store owner who just makes right at 45 thousand
a year. He too has a college degree.

I know several Airline flight attendants that have college
degrees and only make 35 thous. a year. some even less than
that.



I thought I would ask this question of others because some one
made the comment that they did not know of any professions where
the person had a degree and made "so little" as they put it .

*************************************

Rephrasing the question "" Anyone gone to college ,,, got the degree ,,
and now with 10 plus years out in the working world making less than
50 thousand a year ????????????????

NookOfTheNorth
04-20-2006, 05:44 PM
Love my job, but after a Master's degree, 2 extra duties and 10 yrs. of experience, let's just say, I make a great deal less than that Hallmark manager.

Where I live, starting teachers begin at 25,000; that can be a hard pill to swallow if one has spent a great deal on a college education.

lizziepooh
04-20-2006, 05:55 PM
I can think of lots! Teachers, many government workers including Social workers, Disability Examiners, Childrens protective services workers all come to mind.

CheapMom
04-20-2006, 06:01 PM
I can think of lots! Teachers, many government workers including Social workers, Disability Examiners, Childrens protective services workers all come to mind.
Don't forget the most underpaid and overworked of them all- Stay At Home Moms!

helens042266
04-20-2006, 06:03 PM
I also have a Master's degree, 13 years experience and I make $44,000.00 a year. I AM NOT complaining! I love my job and knew going into it that I would never make a lot of money. My brother-in-law is a photo editor at a large newspaper. He has a degree and makes about $40,000 (20 years on the job)

crisi
04-20-2006, 06:05 PM
I have a friend who is a librarian. Masters degree required. Makes much less than 50k.

Two friends who are teachers who have masters, less than 50k.

Writers (copy writers, technical writers), less than 50k (starting).

Some industries (publishing comes to mind) are notorious for low pay starting.

tfiga
04-20-2006, 06:06 PM
I have a BA and work at a mortgage co and make less than $50,000.00 and in Metro Detroit that is pretty pitiful.

Desnik
04-20-2006, 06:10 PM
My DH is college educated. He has a degree in Bussiness and was also getting a degree in early education. This was when we first met. He had an opportunity to get a job with Verizon and this is what he was faced with: continue with student loans to finish his degree(only a semester to go), student teach and then get paid $30,000 a year, or take the job at Verizon and start at a salary of $60,000 WITHOUT overtime which usually doubles his salary!! Which do you think he chose?(I should add that we were getting married and starting a family at the time) It really is a shame that teachers make what they do. The good thing is that DH will be able to retire at an early age and plans on teaching then.

ilovepcot
04-20-2006, 06:10 PM
I had a family member who had already earned her master's degree and was working toward her *doctorate* while being an associate professor at a major university. She earned far less than $45,000 a year. I also know blue collar workers (with no H.S. diploma) who earn fabulous salaries..... by anyone's standard! :teeth:

Lyn5
04-20-2006, 06:14 PM
How about attorneys, engineers , nurses and other professionals where, in some cases, you need to pass governmental exams to get your license/practice. In some cases, a person could work several years building the experinces to qualify or trying to pass the exams.....all the while making under $50,000.

pearlieq
04-20-2006, 06:16 PM
I think the difference lies in income potential.

Without a college degree, career options are generally pretty limited--you're probably going to be limited to skilled/unskilled labor, retail, and other types of service industry jobs. You may get to a point where you make $60,000 a year, but generally that's the pinnacle.

So, for a while you might be doing better now than that new college-educated teacher at $28,000, by the middle of their career, that teacher is going to be making $70,000+ (at least around here). That kid with the business degree who started at $35,000 is now in corporate management and making $100,000.

Before anyone chimes in, of course there are exceptions. Some people without college degrees start their own businesses and do well. Some become famous actors. Some people with college degrees never make it out of middle management or dedicate their lives to running a Head Start center.

I actually wasn't suprised by the question in the other thread the OP is referring to. I don't know any one with a degree in a professional field who is making less than 50k (aside from those just starting out).

KarenAylwood
04-20-2006, 06:18 PM
I had no real concept of salaries until I started looking for a job.

I have a Masters in Chemistry and am making $35,000 on paper- with overtime it will be more like 38-40K since every other week has 10 overtime hours built into it and there are many opportunities to pick up an extra 12 hours here and there. I work hourly though which is good. I also know that I'm making more than others in my same position- there are 4 others with bachelors and they are all making approx 32-33K.

I am, however overqualified and will move up within a year or so, and will probably be making about 50-60K. I don't feel bad starting at the bottom though- gives me an opportunity to learn, get involved in a great company, and when getting a Masters or PhD in Chemistry, your school pays tuition and living expenses so it wasn't like I took a huge financial blow- I have no loans to pay back.

I know TONS of people graduating from college now definitely making less than 50- in fact, most make less than 40. My three friends living and working in DC started at 35K- which is nothing for that area- hardly enough to save anything.

Another friend will finish her masters in accounting in May- she's got a job lined up making $42K right near me- but still has $85,000 in loans to pay back.

I know of only two people that graduated from college w/ a bachelors and went on to make over 50K. Those that are going to make more went on to become doctors and lawyers.

Once you get the degree and start looking for a job- things are definitely put in prospective. :rolleyes:

RadioNate
04-20-2006, 06:18 PM
Both DH and I have college degrees, in fact I have 2. Both of us started in professional positions that required college degrees that paid less than 30K.

momrek06
04-20-2006, 06:25 PM
I was at an Open House for a business in our town last week and ran into a good friend who I have not seen in 2 years...her son is graduating UCONN with a pharmacy degree (6 years in school) and his starting salary is $99,000 with the SHAWS SUPERMARKETS in their pharmacy(location yet to be made) and also received a $20,000 early signing bonus with SHAWS....

IS THAT LIKE AWESOME OR WHAT!!!! He is 23yo and starting at $99,000!!!!

I was blown away!!!! His mom is too!!!! :teeth:

holden
04-20-2006, 06:28 PM
I have a BA in English, an MA in Education, 30+ credits beyond my masters and 7 years experience in teaching. I make less than 50,000 as a high school teacher and work aprrox. 65 hours a week.

JuneChickie
04-20-2006, 06:28 PM
I guess I should rephrase the question ,,,

Anyone gone to college,,, got the degree ,, ,, and now after 10 plus years in the
working world making less than 50 thousand ???????

crazelion
04-20-2006, 06:58 PM
BS in Information Systems makes less 12,000 year if I'm lucky.

I have not be offer job in my field. College was unless to me. Good thing I went college for free.

disneysteve
04-20-2006, 08:04 PM
I guess I should rephrase the question ,,,

Anyone gone to college,,, got the degree ,, ,, and now after 10 plus years in the
working world making less than 50 thousand ???????
I responded on the other thread but let me do so here also. You made it sound like you and your husband together earn 50K and both have college degrees. That's why the question came up, I think. If only one of you is working and making 50K, that's completely different. There are lots of fields where that could be the case but I can't think of any where 2 college grads working for 10+ years would still be making less than 50K total.

JuneChickie
04-20-2006, 08:07 PM
WEll that ones easy disney steve ,,,, The airlines and car plants ,,, with all the layoffs and cuts ,,,, and those are only two that come to mind,, I'm sure others can name more.

KarenAylwood
04-20-2006, 08:07 PM
I responded on the other thread but let me do so here also. You made it sound like you and your husband together earn 50K and both have college degrees. That's why the question came up, I think. If only one of you is working and making 50K, that's completely different. There are lots of fields where that could be the case but I can't think of any where 2 college grads working for 10+ years would still be making less than 50K total.

This explanation would make a lot more sense as to why the topic came up.

All the experience I have is knowing those starting out from college. My parents are a little different in that my mom got in with the state of NY when the getting was good and is making over 60K (with her qualifications she probably couldn't do that now starting out) while dad owns his own business and depending on the year can make a lot more than that.

DBF's mom has an associates degree in occupational therapy and makes 44K or so.

disneysteve
04-20-2006, 08:14 PM
WEll that ones easy disney steve ,,,, The airlines and car plants ,,, with all the layoffs and cuts ,,,, and those are only two that come to mind,, I'm sure others can name more.
No flames. Just curiousity. Do the jobs that pay 25K/year with the airlines and car companies actually require a college degree?

vhoffman
04-20-2006, 08:28 PM
My first degree was liberal arts with foreign language minor (Spanish, French, & German). I literally couldn't find a job washing dishes with that degree! I worked at a Jack in the Box just to pay my bills. I finally found a job in a hospital accounting department, for little more than minimum wage! No one grasped my situation -- they thought if I had a college degree, the bucks would flow, so, therefore, I must be rich? Especially since I was then single, without children, so I could blow all my money on myself. I finally went back and got a second bachelor's in accounting, then a MBA, but I'm still not "rich". With the bachelor's in accounting, the best I could do was $32000/year. I never went back to work after getting the MBA, its just a useless piece of paper on my wall. I reached a fork in the road where I could either pursue a career or children; due to my age and health I couldn't pursue both.

Basically, I bought the crap from high school guidance counselors to "follow your dream". When trying to decide a college major, starting salaries and cost-of-living were not even discussed. I was told such drivel as "...do what you enjoy, the money will follow" and "a college education is to broaden your horizons, not to earn a specific salary". Well, a college degree is a LOT of time and money and effort, not to be taken lightly. I can't go back and recoup those lost years, and indeed my career now is raising my children, which I say with pride. Fortunately, dh makes more than enough to support us, and I have a home business which brings in a tidy sum. However, I will NOT let my kids make the same mistakes I did. If you're going to college (which they WILL), do it right. Study a major that at least has an application, and do look at salaries, work conditions, etc. DD says she wants to be a veterinarian, due to her love of animals. Well, according to a recent MONEY magazine article, the money vets make just isn't adequate for what they go through to get there. She could make just as much or more in something that doesn't require so much school (time on her part and money on our part), plus, once we're through putting her through vet school how does she start a practice? We will be entering retirement then and won't have the money to help her launch a practice, and she certainly wouldn't want to go into debt to start a practice with student loans, etc.

My advice to anyone considering a college education, go for it, but do it with eyes wide open! Get real!

momrek06
04-20-2006, 08:30 PM
WOW 25K a year with a college degree....It cost DH & I each year my oldest DS (graduated 2004) year 1, 30,000, year 2, 31,500, year 3, 33,000, year 4, 33,500!!!!!

I just cannot imagine these kids today graduating college and paying more for their actual college PER YEAR, than they are making PER YEAR....it really amazes me. It is scary out there today to try and work and make a decent living.

My DS is making $52,000 a year and basically complains he has NO money. He is paying off his college loans, car payment, car insurance, gas, health club, cell-phone, NO RENT, (lives at his Gram's house while she is away Sept-April) BUT pays all the utilities while at Gram's from oil, electricity, house-phone. He moves back with us for May-Aug and saves money that way. He does have a DGF and they do go to dinner and movies. He shops for everything INCLUDING underwear at Banana Republic of which I told him "get to Target for your underwear"! :rolleyes:

Like DisneySteve ask: Are there jobs out there really that pay LESS than 25K for a 4 year college degree....Hhmmmm :confused3

JuneChickie
04-20-2006, 08:32 PM
I don't know about starting off under 25 grand right out of college ,, thats a good question too ,,,,, ANyone experience that ?

pearlieq
04-20-2006, 08:36 PM
This is getting way off topic and I think you are :stir: doing it on purpose.
I give up ,,, :badpc:

Huh? This thread has been about as OT as it gets.

Sorry you aren't getting the answer you wanted, but that's no reason to get upset. :confused3

Pigeon
04-20-2006, 08:43 PM
A college degree is no guarantee of anything, income included. However, statistically speaking, college grads earn a great deal more than non-college grads. http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/education/004214.html

DVCLiz
04-20-2006, 08:51 PM
This is certainly a bizarre thread. I thought I read that the OP and her spouse combined made less than 50K a year after years of working, and they each had a college degree. I find that very hard to believe. If true, it's just a matter of making choices that limited their opportunities. Either they chose obscure fields or locations that had little job opportunity (but perhaps other intangible benefits.)

Bottom line - I can't imagaine any two people combined who make less than 50K combined with college degrees, unless they aren't working in their fields or put a geographical obstacle in their way. Either that, or much of the college degree just didn't take, because that wouldn't be a choice many educated peoeple would really make.

Just my opinion...

momrek06
04-20-2006, 08:57 PM
A college degree is no guarantee of anything, income included. However, statistically speaking, college grads earn a great deal more than non-college grads. http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/education/004214.html

GOOD ARTICLE, PIGEON: That being said #2 DS is a sophomore in college. Costing us as much as DS#1! DS#2 is majoring in ART HISTORY minor Political Science....

I HAVE NO CLUE WHAT HE WILL DO WITH ART HISTORY.... :rolleyes:

He is spending the summer on the Isle of Crete(Greece) doing excavations. College was given grant money and he was selected (along with others) to go. He said they will dig for POTTERY. Interesting? Maybe he could do that upon graduation from this very $$$$ private Catholic college here in the Northeast and then he could sell his POTTERY findings to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NY....DS has informed me that "you have issues, mom" :confused3

BUT seriously, DS what will YOU do??? :confused:

Helene
04-20-2006, 08:59 PM
I guess I should rephrase the question ,,,

Anyone gone to college,,, got the degree ,, ,, and now after 10 plus years in the
working world making less than 50 thousand ???????


Yes, me. As a matter of fact, I have a Master's Degreee in Social Work with 15 years experience and basicallly average in the mid-$40's.

Unfortunately, I picked a field that is not heavily rewarded in a financial sense. But I do get alot of satisfaction from what I do and now that I've opened a private practice, it does allow for alot of flexibility.

Helene

momx2
04-20-2006, 09:02 PM
I guess I should rephrase the question ,,,

Anyone gone to college,,, got the degree ,, ,, and now after 10 plus years in the
working world making less than 50 thousand ???????

Yes, my DH (45) has been employed by the same place for 15+ and makes anywhere from $31K to $42K per year depending on his commissions.

taximomfor4
04-20-2006, 09:10 PM
I guess I should rephrase the question ,,,

Anyone gone to college,,, got the degree ,, ,, and now after 10 plus years in the
working world making less than 50 thousand ???????


Yes, DH is a high school teacher with 11 yrs in, and makes under $50k still.

MarySB
04-20-2006, 09:26 PM
I'm a teacher M.Ed. degree, 27 years of experience. Just made the $50000 mark this year. It triggered a State requirement that anyone who makes $50000+ per year must make complete financial disclosures, including info re spouse, children, parents, and inlaws, the same that is required of those in public office. Kinda makes me wish I made $49999.99 :furious:

disneysteve
04-20-2006, 09:30 PM
It triggered a State requirement that anyone who makes $50000+ per year must make complete financial disclosures, including info re spouse, children, parents, and inlaws, the same that is required of those in public office.
That is bizarre! Why does your job give anyone the right to the financial info of your parents and inlaws, or your spouse and children for that matter? What is the intent of that law?

Philadisney
04-20-2006, 09:36 PM
Do you or anyone you know that has a gone to college and finished
with a degree make 50 thousand or less ? **********
.....I know several people in "store" management that only make 30 to 45 thousand a year. All have college degrees in "business" mgnt. and yes
I'm sure there are others who make way more. But the point is
there are people with degrees who make less than 50 thou. a year.


:eek: WOW. i have a bachelor of science and i would LOVE to make 50 thou a year. i make about half that. far less than someone in store management apparantly!!!

i have only been out of college a couple years. everyone says "be patient, you'll make more eventually" :rolleyes: i am moving in june becos my paycheck is so small i can no longer afford my teeny 1-bedroom apartment. i have friends who graduated last year with degrees in business & computer science who make tons more than i do. guess i picked the wrong career path!

and i bet you thought television production was a glamorous profession, didn't you! :rotfl:

Philadisney
04-20-2006, 09:41 PM
I guess I should rephrase the question ,,,

Anyone gone to college,,, got the degree ,, ,, and now after 10 plus years in the
working world making less than 50 thousand ???????

aha. well, clearly i didn't read the rest of the thread before posting! oh well.
i always find it interesting what people in other professions make.

PoohHappens
04-20-2006, 10:11 PM
Nurse chiming in here.....depending on where you live in the country this is very possible, I do not work full time but if I did I would make just over 50 and I make a mid to high range hourly for nursing.

deide71
04-20-2006, 10:21 PM
Nurse chiming in here.....depending on where you live in the country this is very possible, I do not work full time but if I did I would make just over 50 and I make a mid to high range hourly for nursing.


I think you need to move :goodvibes . I work at a hospital in Minneapolis. The hourly wage for nurses @ our facility starts at 26.00/hr, and tops out at 39.00/hr. I know nurses that make over $100k/yr with overtime and bonuses.


The hours can kinda stink though.

momrek06
04-20-2006, 10:28 PM
I think you need to move :goodvibes . I work at a hospital in Minneapolis. The hourly wage for nurses @ our facility starts at 26.00/hr, and tops out at 39.00/hr. I know nurses that make over $100k/yr with overtime and bonuses.


The hours can kinda stink though.

MOVE TO THE NORTHEAST: My girlfriend's daughter is a Occupational Therapist with an Associates degree and she is starting at
$25.00ph.

fac
04-20-2006, 10:38 PM
It depends on the industry and the regions.

In 1996, I managed a team in financial and hired people fresh out of college for 60k. I had also hired someone with a Ph. D in Math and paid him 55k. At year end, when I told him he would get 25k bonus. He told me that he worked in the wrong industry previously. He had been getting 35k teaching in a county college.

maleficent1959
04-20-2006, 10:56 PM
GOOD ARTICLE, PIGEON: That being said #2 DS is a sophomore in college. Costing us as much as DS#1! DS#2 is majoring in ART HISTORY minor Political Science....

I HAVE NO CLUE WHAT HE WILL DO WITH ART HISTORY.... :rolleyes:

He is spending the summer on the Isle of Crete(Greece) doing excavations. College was given grant money and he was selected (along with others) to go. He said they will dig for POTTERY. Interesting? Maybe he could do that upon graduation from this very $$$$ private Catholic college here in the Northeast and then he could sell his POTTERY findings to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NY....DS has informed me that "you have issues, mom" :confused3

BUT seriously, DS what will YOU do??? :confused:

From Career Services at Rutgers:

"Some students want to pursue careers as curators or archivists at the many museums and galleries across the country. Others, knowing they have an eye for art and design, but lacking the interest in pursuing a career as an artist, use art history to hone their intellectual abilities in art for careers in media, advertising, publishing, fashion or design. Another path for historians is art therapy, working with handicapped or disabled people. There is a trend toward providing additional training and certification for this specialty. Others move into careers in business, government and other non-profit organizations."

There is a bigger list of potential careers and employers, including government agencies, as well as jobs recent Rutgers art history graduates have gotten at the site (http://careerservices.rutgers.edu/Marthistory.html). There's also a similarly huge list for anthropology if he discovers that he likes "digging for pottery" in Crete.

JudicialTyranny
04-20-2006, 11:01 PM
IS THAT LIKE AWESOME OR WHAT!!!! He is 23yo and starting at $99,000!!!!
I say they should double his salary if he could figure out a way to count out 30 pills and put them in a bottle in less than a half hour! The pharmacists around here sure can't! :lmao:

sdoll
04-20-2006, 11:14 PM
I think it is a horrible shame what teachers, police officers and social workers make. I was a corrections officer for a while. I was involved in a fight with a few prisoners and I did not win pretty much got my you know what kicked. I got home from work that night and thought why am I doing this for $11.13 an hour when I have a degree and can do more. I started looking for a new job the next day ended up in retail and now make well over 50,000 and I am no where near the max of my earning potential. I have never looked back and love my job. I think the moral of the story is that every college student needs to listen to their mom. I sure wish I did she always knows best!!!!

momrek06
04-20-2006, 11:31 PM
From Career Services at Rutgers:

"Some students want to pursue careers as curators or archivists at the many museums and galleries across the country. Others, knowing they have an eye for art and design, but lacking the interest in pursuing a career as an artist, use art history to hone their intellectual abilities in art for careers in media, advertising, publishing, fashion or design. Another path for historians is art therapy, working with handicapped or disabled people. There is a trend toward providing additional training and certification for this specialty. Others move into careers in business, government and other non-profit organizations."

There is a bigger list of potential careers and employers, including government agencies, as well as jobs recent Rutgers art history graduates have gotten at the site (http://careerservices.rutgers.edu/Marthistory.html). There's also a similarly huge list for anthropology if he discovers that he likes "digging for pottery" in Crete.

WHY THANK YOU VERY MUCH!!! What a fabulous college RUTGERS is, we used to live in Cherry Hill, NJ....so there is HOPE for DS!!!! I believe that some day, one day DS will have his OWN Art Gallery....he will SURPRISE us all, he has a tendency to do that on a pretty regular basis!!! :thumbsup2

MyGoofy26
04-21-2006, 02:16 AM
Very interested in the responses here. . . I'm starting to feel the stress. Just a week left of classes and I'm down to just one class left that I'll complete this summer so that as of the first week of July, no more school for me. Starting to worry. I've started sending some resumes out. I want to relocate but I'm a little drained and don't want to make a big move with *just* enough money to cover it. I don't want to have to pack up a month later because the money isn't coming in yet. So I'm stuck looking for something around here to get a little cushion so can start looking at better jobs in better areas.

So far. . . not much luck.

DawnM
04-21-2006, 04:53 AM
I think it also depends on where you live.

In CA as a School Counselor I was making close to $70K. Here in NC that same job would make a little less than $50K even with my experience and TWO Master's Degrees!

My husband was making $90K in SoCal and his exact same job here in NC pays $65K.

So, I think it really depends on location as well.

Dawn

tbelfonti
04-21-2006, 08:16 AM
My husband has a BFA in graphic design and being out of school for 13 years - he makes less than $40K a year.

BeNJeNWaFFLe
04-21-2006, 09:27 AM
:eek: WOW. i have a bachelor of science and i would LOVE to make 50 thou a year. i make about half that. far less than someone in store management apparantly!!!

i have only been out of college a couple years. everyone says "be patient, you'll make more eventually" :rolleyes: i am moving in june becos my paycheck is so small i can no longer afford my teeny 1-bedroom apartment. i have friends who graduated last year with degrees in business & computer science who make tons more than i do. guess i picked the wrong career path!

and i bet you thought television production was a glamorous profession, didn't you! :rotfl:

I graduated last year with a BS in Computer Science. Trust me, the average salary isn't that great. All those articles said that the average starting salary for CS majors was @$50,000. Well, not exactly. If you live in an area where there aren't many students graduating with that degree, then yes. If you are looking for a job in an area heavily populated with CS majors, then you will make just about $35,000. I am friends with many engineering majors and just about none are making close to $50K.

Don't worry about not being able to afford anything. I am in your shoes. I am paying off school loans right now. I knock on wood everyday that my car will last me another couple of years. And I thank my parents for letting me stay home rent free because there is no chance in heck that I can afford a house around here, let alone an apartment.

Littlemotherhaywood
04-21-2006, 09:36 AM
My dh has a BA in Spanish and a Masters in Business. He has seven years of experience and only makes $50,000 a year. He has a piddly ten percent bonus that he has to pull hair to get every quarter. His previous job was a salary of $36K but he determined his own bonuses there based on production and made more than he makes now. If anyone knows of any decent jobs with these requirements, send them our way:)

Jynohn
04-21-2006, 09:41 AM
I'm among what you would call the "under employed." I graduated 11 years ago from a very reputable private school with a BS in Marketing. Unfortunately, I discovered I HATED Marketing after I graduated :( I then took a job as a case manager at a group home, where I loved working, but couldn't live on the low wages. After that I became a flight attendant, another job I loved, but couldn't continue with due to inner ear problems associated with frequent flying. I'm now working as an administrative assisant, making $38K a year and paying off my huge student loans.

I decided last year to go back to school to be a court reporter. I'm currently working on my associates in court reporting. I will be finished next year and the estimated starting salary for my area is ~$50K. I really wish they had more career counseling in college. When I think of all the years (and money) wasted on that marketing degree it makes my head hurt. :(

rbarkc
04-21-2006, 09:50 AM
I will have to agree that teachers are WAY under paid!!!! My DW's first job was as a teacher and she made less than I did and I didn't have my degree at that time. She is now a Youth Pastor working part time and she makes almost as much as she did working as a full time teacher! I work as a software engineer and make 65K+ a year. I have six years experience in the field. The sad thing is that my mom, who taught Special Ed Reading with 30+ year’s experience, had her Masters +60 hours and was making less than that when she retired. That's messed up!!!!

As I saw in an earlier post one thing that everyone has to keep in mind when looking at what a job makes here and what a job makes there is that the cost of living varies greatly in different areas. Just ‘Google’ Cost of Living Calculator and check it out. I did and I was blown away. To have my same life style that I have in the Midwest I would need to make $214,325 if I were to move to San Francisco, CA. Let me tell you I make NO where near that where I live. I don’t even make into the six figures.

There is no doubt that teachers and other service workers are under paid. If you really want to make your blood boil just think about how much some of the sports figures or Hollywood actors/actresses are being paid and I would be willing to bet that not all of them have college degrees.

mannasn
04-21-2006, 10:17 AM
I'll be graduating as a BSN-prepared nurse in a few days - and I will start out making a great deal less than $50K! And so many people think nurses are making a killing? LOL :)

(Nevermind that I get depressed just thinking about my $25K in student loans! OMG! :o)

PoohHappens
04-21-2006, 11:09 AM
[QUOTE=deide71]I think you need to move :goodvibes . I work at a hospital in Minneapolis. The hourly wage for nurses @ our facility starts at 26.00/hr, and tops out at 39.00/hr. I know nurses that make over $100k/yr with overtime and bonuses.


We moved here from MN, my house here would cost almost twice as much in minneapolis/st.paul so it is probably about the same

Disneycrazymom
04-21-2006, 11:50 AM
I am a jr high math teacher with a masters and 10 years experience. If I were full time I would make about 30,000. The nice thing that my degree has provided is opportunity. This year I am working part time teaching math and science enrichment 2 1/2 days a week. I am making about 10,000 and I love having the best of both worlds. (home time and work too) I do think kids need to really think about "the money" when they start school. I can't imagine doing anything but teaching, I love it and I don't care about the money as my reward is the kids BUT I also have a DH who pays the bills! High School Seniors need to understand how the choices they make will effect thier lifestyle in the future.

sweet maxine
04-21-2006, 11:59 AM
**************

BethR
04-21-2006, 12:02 PM
I've got two graduating seniors this year, and I'm going to have them read all the posts on this thread. This is all great food for thought!

::yes:: For ANYONE in HS!!!

eliza61
04-21-2006, 12:05 PM
How about attorneys, engineers , nurses and other professionals where, in some cases, you need to pass governmental exams to get your license/practice. In some cases, a person could work several years building the experinces to qualify or trying to pass the exams.....all the while making under $50,000.


Thank you, thank you Lyn5. As a RN with a masters degree we are just now getting a decent salary and I think the only reason that has happen is because in the last few years there has been a nursing shortage. Why is there a nursing shortage, one reason because for so long the salary has been lousy.

It is truly a rewarding career but you won't get rich doing it.

Chicago526
04-21-2006, 12:34 PM
Yes. Three of my four best friends have college degrees (one has a masters) and they each make less than $50,000 a year. The friend with the masters works for the state, though, and will eventually max out over that, plus gets a kick butt pension. Another friend is a grade school teacher ('nuff said) and the third friend has a Bachelor's in economics, which I guess doesn't get you a job anywhere. She works as a customer service rep in a call center for a major cell phone company. She makes maybe $30,000 a year, but she loves it and gets good benifits too.

I, however, only have a HS diploma and make as much as my friend with the masters, and more than my other two friends. My DH also never went to college and makes even more than I do! I sometimes wonder if we made the better choice afterall (not to go to college), we didn't have college loans to pay back and it seems we make as good as money as many people with degrees anyway!

ladysoleil
04-21-2006, 12:45 PM
I think it varies a lot depending on what you do.

I am an administrative assistant. I definitely make more than some of my friends with degrees do, but I also have 10 years of experience and some special skills (project management, tech stuff) that I learned on my own that adds value to what I do. I have some college but no degree.

That said, my friends who make less in similar jobs are in similar jobs because they are working their way up to something bigger. I get more now because I'm experienced, but they're paying their dues to move on to a much more lucrative position in time. I'm not- I will sooner or later get to move up to a more project manager or technical-type role, but it would be for less money than someone they pulled off the street with a marketing degree/tech degee would get for the same work, I'm sure. I probably won't advance much past that, either. I have the skills because I learned them in the field, but that doesn't always mean something to people who hire for the jobs.

Truthfully, I'm not bothered by this too much. I like what I do. I like the people I work for. I find my work challenging and satisfying. I make enough money to get by comfortably. I'd love more money- most people would, but all my basic needs and some of the wants get met, I don't have debt, I'm putting money in the bank and I'm comfortable with where I am.

I would need to go back and finish school to get someplace bigger and more important, but I don't know if that's a priority for me right now. I want to go back to school eventually because I enjoy it, but right now I have other things I want to do first- buy a house, travel, spend some more time with friends and family, etc. I could find the money for school but right now it's not what I want to do with my time, if that makes sense.

It's certainly possible that my wants and needs will change later. I could make more money, but it's not necessarily about money for me right now. I don't know if that makes me a success or a failure by the average definition- I feel that I work hard, I do good work, and I'm happy, so in my book, I'm doing okay.

So yes, it's true that I make more than some people with a degree in my field, but they aren't doing this as a career, which changes the circumstances a lot, I think.

vhoffman
04-21-2006, 01:29 PM
Yes, sadly its true, some people make more without a college degree than those that have one (or two, or more!) It just depends on the choice of major, the area you live in, etc.

I have two children, ds9 & dd8. Of course, we are already planning their college education, put away $500/month in a college fund. However, that won't be enough with today's college prices, especially since we will have two in college at the same time. Due to our circumstances, we probably won't qualify for any type of financial aid, either. We plan to have them go on the "economy plan". Knock out as many courses as they can at a community (cheaper!) college, place out ouf courses with advanced placement exams (not as tough as it sounds, I waived 18 credits by exam!), and the real kicker--live at home! We have a major university right in town, why go elsewhere? Of course, they will probably want to live on their own at that age, spread their wings, etc. I lived in a dorm my 4.5 years of college and have mixed feelings about it. While I loved being independent (my parents were the controlling type - I'm surprised even now they let me go away to college!), however, dorms can be real zoos. It wasn't that long ago I was there, I know!

Well, both my kids will simply have to realize we can't do everything. Live at home, work part-time to contribute to costs, take waiver exams, etc. they can possibly graduate without student loans, or at least that's my hope! However, for all that sacrifice, on all our parts, I do insist they get something that's at least marketable! I won't have them graduate with a worthless degree, like I did. Especially since we'll be in our early sixties by the time they graduate, we might not be able to provide them with the "soft landing" many parents give their children. I want them "launched". They can always "find themselves" later. (Or is that a concept from the 60's era?) Essentially, I was lied to by colleges. I was told certain degrees are much more marketable than they actually are. Statistics can be manipulated, and colleges are masters at selling their worthless programs! To say things like "....Art history majors work in business, government,....etc" gives the impression that there's actually openings in such fields with the primary requirement being an Art History major. Baloney! Perhaps some with an Art History major somehow wiggled their way into such jobs after adding to their skill set with work experience, etc., however, I can almost guarantee you they didn't just come right out the college door into such a job!

Look at a college education as an investment, not a privelege. You're paying for it, get something in return! Look critically at the job market. First, is there even an application for this major? Don't worry too much about demand as you begin college, everything is cyclical. I originally wanted to major in teaching, however, the job market was saturated with teachers then and I was talked out of it. Now there's a demand for teachers! (yes, I know, the pay is still substandard). Also, do look at starting salaries for that type of field. If its low now, chances are it will remain lower than other fields, even as they all increase each year. Of course, make sure its something you enjoy, it will be your life's work. However, don't just look at a career for the "fun factor". You have "fun" after work! Being unemployed isn't "fun" either! Many years ago my father suggested I study pharmacy, but I rejected that idea without even looking into it. The thought of spending my days counting pills sounded "not fun". Well, making 100k+ sure sounds like "fun". :banana: However, try convincing a "party animal" teenager that there's more to life than "fun". :woohoo:

I'm starting now to plan my children's future, mainly because I don't want them making the same mistakes I did and suffering the same pain I did. You have no idea how painful it is to try to sell yourself on the job market with a worthless degree, watching all your friends who just went to high school making more than you could hope to. Meanwhile, there you are, all
educated" and "well-rounded" and can't make enough for the basics of life, let alone a few luxuries. :sad2: Imagine my frustration when I was working at my dead-end, low-paid job as a accounting assistant, a job which I all but sat up and begged for, then I read in the newspaper that the average welfare receipeint's monthly check was more than my take-home! :furious:

Yes, I want my children to have an education, broaden their horizions, understand the world about them, not grow up to be bigots, etc., but does college guarantee all that? I just want to know they're settled and can take care of themselves as dh and I round the bend into retirement. They can reach "self-actualization" later.

katied
04-21-2006, 01:48 PM
I think it makes sense for HS seniors to think about these issues. My sister and brother both have college degrees, and neither makes more then $50K/yr. They both went to private, well-respected universities. But one has a theater degree and the other a communications degree. My sister is now working for a Masters in Divinity, and works for a church. She will never make 50K (absent inflation). But she has made a personal choice about how to live her life.

I wanted to be self-sufficient and have a more comfortable life. I choose to attend a state school (less student loans) and study accounting. It helped that the state school in IL has the #1 accounting program in the country. After 10 years (plus a masters degree), I now earn about 4 times what I did when I graduated, and I have student loan debt. I've also gotten to a point where I can have a flexible schedule, 6 weeks vacation, pension, 401(k), etc. My sister and I would never trade places with each other. We're both happy with our decisions, but its something kids need to think about up front (and before parents waste money on 5+ years of college or kids incur too much debt on school expenses).

kelleigh1
04-21-2006, 02:05 PM
My younger sister earned her Bachelors and Masters and was always on the Dean's List.

I graduated high school and was working full-time within two months of graduation.

Currently she is not work..but that is for health reasons. When she was getting paid, she made about half what I make and I don't yet make $50,000.

Her degree is in education, and she never actually used her degree. After obtaining her Masters, she went to work at a college as a resident advisor. She stated that she decided to go into college administration because it would pay for and because she realized that she wasn't cut out to teach. At this point though, her illness prevents her from being able to work so there is no career path at this point.

stanncie
04-21-2006, 11:28 PM
We're both happy with our decisions, but its something kids need to think about up front (and before parents waste money on 5+ years of college or kids incur too much debt on school expenses).


I completely agree! kids and parents need to really think through what they want out of a career, both in pay and personal satisfaction before they commit to college . Like it's been illustrated in this thread, a college degree doesn't necessarily guarantee a good paying job. I know many construction workers who make over 100k/year and many teachers who make 30K and the like. Obviously construction is a more physical and dangerouos job but you get the idea.

I think it is very important to pursue something you really like but at the same time one has to be practical. Often a person has the aptitude to be successful and enjoy different careers. Many times though we close ourselves to careers that are very familiar to us.

I was very fortunate to study physical therapy back when it was still only a bachelor's degree. It was not my first choice by far but at the time my family's financial situation was not the best. My mom told me ' you need to study something that will give you a good salary right away, so PT it was. I don't really regret it since i enjoy my career immensely.

My sister went the journalistic route and has been out of school for a year now, she still has not found a job! she is very qualified but has only managed to get a few freelance assignments for little pay. She has always been interested in communications and the like so one day I suggested maybe she could get her masters in speech therapy? :confused3 lol!!

She is really considering it and is excited about it, my mom and I are pushing it :cheer2: :cheer2: If she does go through with it she will have great job security and a great salary so she is quite intrigued!

Again, i'm not saying give up on your passion or your dream but at the same time, now what you are getting into

wdwfan1
04-22-2006, 12:15 AM
Sad to say--new starting salary for a NYPD police officer is under $25,000.

momrek06
04-22-2006, 12:23 AM
Sad to say--new starting salary for a NYPD police officer is under $25,000.

NOW THAT RIGHT THERE HAS TO CHANGE ::yes:: !!!
My DH lived in Hoboken for 4 years 2000-04 while working for the NYNJ Port Authority. My family spent all four years shopping, eating, dining, show going in the BIG APPLE 24/7! I saw FIRST HAND the wonderful, outstanding, professionalism of the NYPD up close. THEY ARE :thumbsup2 !!!

COME ON SOMEONE IN NY NEEDS TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT THEIR SALARIES!!! ::yes:: If I lived closer (but we are back in Beantown) I would go to CITY HALL for you and get you the money you all deserve. :wave2:

PaulaSue
04-22-2006, 08:54 AM
Do you or anyone you know that has a gone to college and finished
with a degree make 50 thousand or less ? **********

While going to college ,,,, we all acknowledge does give us a better
chance at the better paying jobs ,,, it does not guarantee that.

I know several people in "store" management that only make 30 to 45 thousand a year. All have college degrees in "business" mgnt. and yes
I'm sure there are others who make way more. But the point is
there are people with degrees who make less than 50 thou. a year.

Rephrasing the question "" Anyone gone to college ,,, got the degree ,,
and now with 10 plus years out in the working world making less than
50 thousand a year ????????????????

This is my Dh to a tee. He runs a tire store and graduated in 92

bord1niowa
04-22-2006, 09:29 AM
I have been reading many of the posts here on this , not all, but most, and I just wanted to stick in my two cents worth. In Iowa 50K is a pretty good salary for just about anyone, even after 10 years. The funny thing is it's not so much what you're doing as who you work for. A prime example of this is a painter. Some make $10 an hour and another I know makes close to 100K with some overtime. Working on a holiday weekend, he can make $1500 dollars just for the weekend! There is no degree needed to be a painter, that I know of anyway. But the one main difference is that the one company is a union shop and as we all know they tend to pay SIGNIFICANTLY more than non-union. Another example is a person sitting and watching a machine run and is making about 70K per year. And I'm sure you all know that most don't make that much doing that. Again, a union shop. So the next time you pay more for breakfast cereal than you'd like to pay, think about how much the workers are making there to bring it to you. The farmer sure isn't getting that money! OK let the onslaught begin! :rotfl2:

Julia M
04-22-2006, 11:02 AM
I completely agree! kids and parents need to really think through what they want out of a career, both in pay and personal satisfaction before they commit to college . Like it's been illustrated in this thread, a college degree doesn't necessarily guarantee a good paying job. I know many construction workers who make over 100k/year and many teachers who make 30K and the like. Obviously construction is a more physical and dangerouos job but you get the idea.

I think it is very important to pursue something you really like but at the same time one has to be practical. Often a person has the aptitude to be successful and enjoy different careers. Many times though we close ourselves to careers that are very familiar to us.

I was very fortunate to study physical therapy back when it was still only a bachelor's degree. It was not my first choice by far but at the time my family's financial situation was not the best. My mom told me ' you need to study something that will give you a good salary right away, so PT it was. I don't really regret it since i enjoy my career immensely.

My sister went the journalistic route and has been out of school for a year now, she still has not found a job! she is very qualified but has only managed to get a few freelance assignments for little pay. She has always been interested in communications and the like so one day I suggested maybe she could get her masters in speech therapy? :confused3 lol!!

She is really considering it and is excited about it, my mom and I are pushing it :cheer2: :cheer2: If she does go through with it she will have great job security and a great salary so she is quite intrigued!

Again, i'm not saying give up on your passion or your dream but at the same time, now what you are getting into

I'm a speech therapist. There are lots of job opportunities, as well as the ability to work part time, with a reasonable salary.

I kind of stumbled into the major myself, and I'm so glad I did. I work part time (I have three kids), summers off (although I also do some work in summer, but it's totally on my schedule).

Julia

stanncie
04-22-2006, 11:51 AM
I'm a speech therapist. There are lots of job opportunities, as well as the ability to work part time, with a reasonable salary.

I kind of stumbled into the major myself, and I'm so glad I did. I work part time (I have three kids), summers off (although I also do some work in summer, but it's totally on my schedule).

Julia

Hey, fellow therapist!! I guess you work in the school system? or do you just take your summers off? I work in pediatric home health and the need for therapists is out of control. My company has kids in waiting lists for therapists that are 40-50 names long sometimes. I could work all day , everyday if i wanted to but i don't want to burn out of course. The flexibility of it is the best thing about it.

I'm always telling people to study therapy either PT, OT or ST :teacher:

NeverlandClub23
04-22-2006, 02:52 PM
My cousin went to school at a great college for 6 years and graduated with a Business Administration degree. My aunt and uncle took out many loans and had several jobs for her to do this. She now works at Starbucks making coffee drinks (she's been doing it for a few years) and loves it. My brother never went to college, works as a drafter, and makes $55k a year. My best friend went to college for 5 years (and got her masters) to be a teacher and now works at a car dealership selling the undercoating (and other things they try to rip you off to buy) and makes decent money but works every day except Tuesday and Thursday, but she loves it.

NeverlandClub23
04-22-2006, 03:02 PM
He shops for everything INCLUDING underwear at Banana Republic of which I told him "get to Target for your underwear"! :rolleyes:

:lmao: :lmao: My brother is the same way! That cracks me up! I told him every time he goes to Banana Republic let me know so I can buy some stock in the company. :rolleyes: Especially when he brings home a white plain shirt that cost $150 but that's a whole other thread... :teeth:

momrek06
04-22-2006, 04:09 PM
:lmao: :lmao: My brother is the same way! That cracks me up! I told him every time he goes to Banana Republic let me know so I can buy some stock in the company. :rolleyes: Especially when he brings home a white plain shirt that cost $150 but that's a whole other thread... :teeth:

WHAT IS UP WITH THESE GUYS.... :rolleyes:

AND NOW HE IS BUYING HIS SOCKS THERE AS WELL.... :rolleyes2

Get some good ole HANES boxers and HANES socks and save your money,
for crying out loud.... ::yes::

:rolleyes1 THIS IS MY SON when I suggest TARGET/WALMART/KMART :sad2:

Tiggeroo
04-22-2006, 05:15 PM
I had tough talks with my kids before they started college. My dd wanted to go to school for anthropology. I told her I would stongly suggest she get a teaching certificate along with the degree. This way she would at least be able to pursue this. Unfortunately what your degree is in matters. Lots of fast food managers have psych degrees. One of the schools my son went to made students sign a form if they were majoring in psych telling them that it would be unlikely to get a job with this degree unless they went on for an advanced degree.
I am getting my teaching degree. Teachers here start at $48,000. My dh has his GED for hs and went to a trade school. He currently makes around $70,000 per year, has fantastic benefits and an even better pension as a commercial hvac mechanic. He could get my sons apprenticeships but neither is interested. An apprentice can make journeyman in 8 years. He gets the benefits right away plus $17. per hour.

mamalle
04-22-2006, 05:24 PM
My husband does not have a degree but his certification for his firefighter/paramedic license. The starting salary in his department is $45,000.
I do have my AA in Nursing and Im not sure what the starting salary is down here for a staff RN but I think its in the lower $20's per hour. I work perdiem and my yearly gross salary changes every year. sometimes I work alot and other times not so much. depends on what is going on with the kids, etc. My hourly rate is higher than dh's at $32.25 and will go up 7% in may. he gets a a 7% raise in July also and already has gotten 2% and 1% towards his retirement health insurance fund back in January. I believe his gross salary for this year will be around $58,000.00. Not counting his cash in for sick time and his money for different allowances..

arielsleepingbeauty
04-22-2006, 05:25 PM
LOL. I have 2 college degrees and make way less than $50,000.00. I am a social worker. My husband has a degree in history and a teaching degree. He tried working in his field, but it wasn't paying the bills. He got a job working in a factory to supplement and JUST working on the weekends, he made more than he would as a teacher. Needless to say he quit his teaching job. We wouldn't have seen him at all if he kept the two jobs. Most of the people he works with make much more money than me and do not have a degree at all. My husband's family is not happy that he is not doing anything in his field, however we have to do what we have to do to make ends meet. A college degree doesn't necessarily mean more money. It all depends what field you are in I suppose.

sk!mom
04-22-2006, 05:34 PM
I have a BA in English, an MA in Education, 30+ credits beyond my masters and 7 years experience in teaching. I make less than 50,000 as a high school teacher and work aprrox. 65 hours a week.


Another teacher here so I make less than 50K. However I only work 187 days a year and have 10 days of paid leave. So I could work only 177 days. I have also had zero child care expenses since DD started Kindergarten.

Why do you work so many hours? My work week is 40 hours. I will sometimes put in an extra hour here and there planning but never anything near 65 hours. I work a couple of extra hours a week tutoring but receive extra pay for that.

webairs
04-22-2006, 09:19 PM
I have a bachelors and masters and due to a buyout at the company I worked for, I went from $52K to $40K. DH makes approximately $40K with no college at all. (He's in sales)

I would like to mention that I dearly love my new job though and with flextime and a very family friendly atmosphere, it more than makes up for the paycut.

beachbunny
04-22-2006, 10:45 PM
While it truly is sad to see so many college educated people earning less than 50K/year, I don't think the reverse is also true. How many millionaires do you think don't have college educations? I know more than a few millionaires (think the millionaire next door, not Paris Hilton) and all of them went to college. I just don't want high schoolers reading this thread to think they have the same chance of making it as a person who is college educated. Without an education, it's a greater uphill battle.

money4mickey
04-22-2006, 11:02 PM
For those of you who are ST's...what kind of money are you making?
I'm in my last year of grad school majoring in Speech Path and just curious what I have to look forward to next year!!!

Teacher03
04-22-2006, 11:14 PM
I just graduated from college in '04. I am a second year teacher at a Catholic Elementary School. I make under $20,000 a year. However, I love my job, so I can live with the pay. (Next year I will break the $20,000 mark!) My husband makes well over $50,000 a year, does not have a college degree, but HATES his job. I have two kids in college now. I constantly worry about their future, but hopefully they can find a job they love AND make a decent wage.

Philadisney
04-23-2006, 09:33 AM
I graduated last year with a BS in Computer Science. Trust me, the average salary isn't that great. All those articles said that the average starting salary for CS majors was @$50,000. Well, not exactly. If you live in an area where there aren't many students graduating with that degree, then yes. If you are looking for a job in an area heavily populated with CS majors, then you will make just about $35,000. I am friends with many engineering majors and just about none are making close to $50K.

Don't worry about not being able to afford anything. I am in your shoes. I am paying off school loans right now. I knock on wood everyday that my car will last me another couple of years. And I thank my parents for letting me stay home rent free because there is no chance in heck that I can afford a house around here, let alone an apartment.

ah $35,000...as i said, still tons more than i make :scared: i started at around $23,000, and am now at around $25,000 after a raise. i guess that when you don't make much, even 10k more seems like a 'ton'. frustrating isn't it...i feel your car pain. i am lucky enough to live somewhere where i don't need a car, but DBF needs one for school and it always seems to be giving him trouble. thank goodness for public trans!

Philadisney
04-23-2006, 09:37 AM
I completely agree! kids and parents need to really think through what they want out of a career, both in pay and personal satisfaction before they commit to college . Like it's been illustrated in this thread, a college degree doesn't necessarily guarantee a good paying job. I know many construction workers who make over 100k/year and many teachers who make 30K and the like. Obviously construction is a more physical and dangerouos job but you get the idea.


i think it's hard for kids to grasp the idea of what a good wage is. i made $6.50 an hour in high school at a local record store. if you told me at 16 that i'd be making twice that in 7 years, i would have been very impressed :cool2: it wasn't until i was already living and working on my own in my early 20's that i started to 'get' what it's REALLY like to be a grown-up and what kind of money is needed to get by in the city i live in.

dcfromva
04-23-2006, 09:46 AM
Here is a link to an artile on average lifetime earnings:
Link to Lifetime Earnings Soar with Education (http://usgovinfo.about.com/library/weekly/aa072602a.htm)

Here is a snip from that article:
..." The report titled "The Big Payoff: Educational Attainment and Synthetic Estimates of Work-Life Earnings" (.pdf) reveals that over an adult's working life, high school graduates can expect, on average, to earn $1.2 million; those with a bachelor's degree, $2.1 million; and people with a master's degree, $2.5 million.
Persons with doctoral degrees earn an average of $3.4 million during their working life, while those with professional degrees do best at $4.4 million."

Here is a link to the US Census Report upon which the previous article was based. (http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/p23%2D210.pdf)

Folks can come up with thousands upon thousands of exceptions either way.. Some folks will be making more and some less--but overall, on average you can expect to make more money with a college degree when considering your lifetime wages.


-DC :earsboy:

nckidwell
04-23-2006, 09:49 AM
I am a teacher and with a Master's degree plus 30 hours past the Master's degree (Rank I) I will make 50k sometime around the time that I retire. My husband is a social worker (who is on call 24/7) soon to have a Master's degree and he will probably never see 50k. However, what is important is that we both enjoy our jobs and feel that we are making a difference.

Oh yeah, when my husband graduated from college the best job that he could find paid $16, 640/year (this was only a few years ago). This also included being on call very often!

fac
04-23-2006, 09:56 AM
I graduated last year with a BS in Computer Science. Trust me, the average salary isn't that great. All those articles said that the average starting salary for CS majors was @$50,000. Well, not exactly. If you live in an area where there aren't many students graduating with that degree, then yes. If you are looking for a job in an area heavily populated with CS majors, then you will make just about $35,000. I am friends with many engineering majors and just about none are making close to $50K.



I see you are from L.I. just some comments.
It all depends on where you work. My nephew graduated from Stony Brook in 2001 (or 2000??) with a Computer Science degree, got an interview while at school and was offered a job that paid 70k + bonus. It was not exactly Wall Street firm but close. It was the year that many firms reneged their offers. On the other hand, if they do make an offer, they pay reasonable salary. My nehpew thought he was lucky though.

dcfromva
04-23-2006, 09:59 AM
Our economy seems to be at a crossroads right now in terms of what will be the next high demand type jobs (but, hasn't this always been so?).

If you look back at history, one thing that is constant is change. One example that I like to think of is the C & O Canal (Link to the C & O Canal) (http://www.georgetowndc.com/canal/canal.php) (If you are ever in Washington, DC, in the spring, summer and fall you can take a ride on The the C & O Canal Tow Path link to the schedule) (http://data2.itc.nps.gov/parks/choh/ppdocuments/2006publicflyer.doc) What does the C & O canal have in common with today? Well, back in 1828 when they started building the canal, it was modern transportation. Getting a job associated with the canal might have seemed pretty secure, in the first years of operation. Unfortunately for the folks supporting the canal, train travel won out as a more efficient and cost effective way of transporting people/goods. All those jobs associated with the canal went away after a relatively short period of time.

The railroad was the up and coming industry for a period of time, too. It used to be a job with the railroad was a good paying and very secure job. It wasn't that long ago that having a job with the airline (if you had a good seniority number, anyway) was a very well paying and secure job.

I'll admit that I don't have much imagination, but 10-15 years ago, I would have never dreamed that it would be cheaper for a company to direct customer service calls over to India. (The jury is still out on whether they can actually provide the "service" in customer service--but, to even come up with the idea that you could technically do this cheaper would have been mind-blowing to me a few years ago.)

What about the transition from horse and buggy to cars? Folks who didn't change their occupations were left behind. I could go on and on with the examples. I have an ancestor that was a cooper. There are not too many folks in that sort of occupation these days. Occupations become obsolete as time goes on....

What is the point of all this? Our economy has always changed and it always will change. As our economy changes, we have to be able to adapt to be able to get the new high demand jobs. Maybe an education might give a person an edge in terms of being able to adapt...

-DC :earsboy:

nckidwell
04-23-2006, 10:32 AM
Another teacher here so I make less than 50K. However I only work 187 days a year and have 10 days of paid leave. So I could work only 177 days. I have also had zero child care expenses since DD started Kindergarten.

Why do you work so many hours? My work week is 40 hours. I will sometimes put in an extra hour here and there planning but never anything near 65 hours. I work a couple of extra hours a week tutoring but receive extra pay for that.

I teach as well and probably put in 55 hours per week minimum. I don't see how you could get everything done in less time than that. I get there at 7:15. The last student leaves at 3:05. Then you have parent meetings or staff meetings. Then you have planning. Then you must also allow time to grade papers, prepare manipulatives, make parent phone calls, arrange guest speakers, plan field trips, take care of committee responsibilities, etc. Yes, you have 30 minutes planning time during the day, but this is when a majority of collaboration occurs (i.e. team meetings, ARC meetings, etc).

In the summers, I find that I am really not off very much. Many professional development opportunities are offered here. Not to mention the summer is when you can digest changes that have been made to curriculum maps and make plans for the next year.

bord1niowa
04-23-2006, 11:04 AM
I agree that "working" teachers are way underpayed in many instances. Which brings me to my point. You'll notice I said "working" teachers.....At the state university here in Iowa, many of the professors don't even teach a class, or maybe one. Yet they are making 6 figures! Where is the fairness, not to mention the sense, in all that!? I always thought teachers were to teach? Maybe there's something I'm missing...... Next time they raise the cost of tuition by an average of 8%, as they do here, why doesn't someone ask if the "working teachers" are getting 8% raises? If I was a teacher, I would be screaming at the union, or National association of teachers or whoever is supposed to be looking out for me! Seems to me the teachers have actually been the last ones to be considered. Oh and on top of all that, the lower salaries etc, I know teachers often use some of their own money for supplies within the classroom. Maybe they don't have to replace the top of the line computers they buy from IBM every two years and save some money. Anybody else here using a computer more than two years old? Enough of my ranting.

MyGoofy26
04-23-2006, 11:24 AM
.....At the state university here in Iowa, many of the professors don't even teach a class, or maybe one.

My aunt and I were talking about this last night because they were talking about raising rates at my university and I told her that most classes are taught by students. She was amazed, and even moreso when I told her that it's not uncommon for a professor to only teach one class a semester. . . sometimes not even each semester.

I don't know how it is in other schools or departments within the schools, but I know that our Comm department puts out more research than any other in the country. Our Univerisity pretty much expects that the professors are doing significant amounts of research in order to get grant money, research money, etc. They can waive fees for a few students to teach classes and call it a loss, but the money that our professors bring in by getting published more than makes up for it.

Tiggeroo
04-23-2006, 11:41 AM
I think college offers more then pay. It allows you to work in a field you like. It also provides more job security. (generally)
My dh makes a very good living without a college degree. But if he was unable to find work in his field he is not qualified to do anything else. If you have a business degree there are alot of areas you could direct a job search. If you have a computer degree with a small amount of training you could specialize in another area. Teachers make less then alot of fields but they get some perks for it. Here you put in your time you will get a pension as well as health benefits on retirement.

bord1niowa
04-23-2006, 11:52 AM
I'm confused. I thought schools were teaching institutions, not businesses. If teaching is now secondary, where have we gone wrong? If research is what's needed, then let research companies do it at their expense, not mine. If a student is in a class with 130 other students and each one is paying literally thousands of dollars for that class, where's the money going?

fac
04-23-2006, 01:36 PM
At the state university here in Iowa, many of the professors don't even teach a class, or maybe one. Yet they are making 6 figures! Where is the fairness, not to mention the sense, in all that!? I always thought teachers were to teach?

Life is never fair as I used to tell my kids. I got to wash dishes and they got to eat. LOL !! University is different, they emphasize on research. A faculty member got tenured by publishing papers. Some people, after they got tenured, only work two days a week drawing a full salary. I had seen a professor using the same multiple choice exam paper every year. It is not uncommon for students to be taught by TAs, whom are Ph.D and master students and have a very busy workload themselves. Apparently, the better students can learn by themselves, in particular, when they are in college.

patsal
04-23-2006, 04:00 PM
Well, I'm a teacher with a Master's degree and 12 years experience--this year I finally do not qualify for foodstamps (which I have never applied for or used, but found it interesting that with that much money and time spent on an education that I would qualify)! BTW I am still not close to the $50,000!

NeverlandClub23
04-24-2006, 10:01 PM
i think it's hard for kids to grasp the idea of what a good wage is. i made $6.50 an hour in high school at a local record store. if you told me at 16 that i'd be making twice that in 7 years, i would have been very impressed :cool2: it wasn't until i was already living and working on my own in my early 20's that i started to 'get' what it's REALLY like to be a grown-up and what kind of money is needed to get by in the city i live in.

I completely agree. When I was 18 and 19 I thought $10 an hour was rich living.

Aimeedyan
04-24-2006, 10:27 PM
$50k! I don't know anybody my age that actually DOES make that ;) Course, I'm in a LCOL area.

I have a bachelors and masters - I'm in ministry. Take a wild guess as to whether or not I'm making anywhere close to $50k =)

Took
04-25-2006, 09:38 AM
Life is never fair as I used to tell my kids. I got to wash dishes and they got to eat. LOL !! University is different, they emphasize on research. A faculty member got tenured by publishing papers. Some people, after they got tenured, only work two days a week drawing a full salary. I had seen a professor using the same multiple choice exam paper every year. It is not uncommon for students to be taught by TAs, whom are Ph.D and master students and have a very busy workload themselves. Apparently, the better students can learn by themselves, in particular, when they are in college.


MY .02 worth: As a full-time prof. in a local comm college, I barely make $50,000/yr with many years experience and a PhD. However, as many have said, job satisfaction (I love teaching and I have Xmas/summers "off"), location (it's very cheap to live in central IL), and job security (I would be among the very last to go) have a lot to do with why a college education can offer more options to working individuals. A lot of making college pay isn't about which degree you get (you SHOULD do what you enjoy) but about marketing yourself and knowing what options are out there for you.

I often counsel uncertain students to really study the job market and to make themselves as flexible as possible while still pursuing their dreams. Have two majors (or, at least, two minors). Take many different kinds of courses. Go to talks and events on campus that discuss job opportunities in various fields. Consider being flexible about where you live (many college grads don't really want to move away from home). All these things can make college really pay off--financially and personally. Most of all, don't just "drift" through college expecting life to hand you a big paying job immediately afterward.

took

iggbees
04-27-2006, 02:08 PM
GOOD ARTICLE, PIGEON: That being said #2 DS is a sophomore in college. Costing us as much as DS#1! DS#2 is majoring in ART HISTORY minor Political Science....

I HAVE NO CLUE WHAT HE WILL DO WITH ART HISTORY.... :rolleyes:

He is spending the summer on the Isle of Crete(Greece) doing excavations. College was given grant money and he was selected (along with others) to go. He said they will dig for POTTERY. Interesting? Maybe he could do that upon graduation from this very $$$$ private Catholic college here in the Northeast and then he could sell his POTTERY findings to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NY....DS has informed me that "you have issues, mom" :confused3

BUT seriously, DS what will YOU do??? :confused:

my minor was art history, and believe you me, i looked into what i could do with that. a lot of my friends have great jobs after they graduated with a degree in art history. it's all about connections. i was interested in going into art conservation, or restoration. the only problem is that i wasn't very good at making connections. i definitely had a ton of opportunities, but i blew them. most of my friends who graduated with art history degrees are now either working for museums, travelling or in graduate school for art history.

i'm wicked jealous that your son is able to go to crete. ancient greece and rome was my favorite art history class. that's going to be an amazing opportunity for him though.

anywhoo, i ended up in biochemistry (which was my major), and i don't make more than 26,000$ a year. i could have found a better paying job and lived at home, but i decided to move in with my bf who is in grad school for comp sci (he makes as much as i do).

DisneyCowgirl
04-28-2006, 05:01 PM
I know plenty of people who graduated from law school and make less than $50k.

mommabo
04-28-2006, 11:43 PM
Originally Posted by sk!mom
Another teacher here so I make less than 50K. However I only work 187 days a year and have 10 days of paid leave. So I could work only 177 days. I have also had zero child care expenses since DD started Kindergarten.

Why do you work so many hours? My work week is 40 hours. I will sometimes put in an extra hour here and there planning but never anything near 65 hours. I work a couple of extra hours a week tutoring but receive extra pay for that.

I teach as well and probably put in 55 hours per week minimum. I don't see how you could get everything done in less time than that. I get there at 7:15. The last student leaves at 3:05. Then you have parent meetings or staff meetings. Then you have planning. Then you must also allow time to grade papers, prepare manipulatives, make parent phone calls, arrange guest speakers, plan field trips, take care of committee responsibilities, etc. Yes, you have 30 minutes planning time during the day, but this is when a majority of collaboration occurs (i.e. team meetings, ARC meetings, etc).

In the summers, I find that I am really not off very much. Many professional development opportunities are offered here. Not to mention the summer is when you can digest changes that have been made to curriculum maps and make plans for the next year.

Well said nckidwell. I too have taught, and never had a 40 hour work week or my summers "off" ..... there is always room for improvement! However, I will say, I have seen my fair share of teachers who DO work 40 hours a week. The kids leave at 3:00 and they are out the door by 3:15 (without taking any work home with them). You could say they have many years of experience and have this "teaching thing" down to an art or perhaps they are ultra organized. Of course, these are the teachers that without exception, I will NEVER have as my child's teacher! When DH asks why I put in such long hours, I say because I would never give my students less than what I would expect for my own children.

BTW, do I think teachers could be paid more? Sure, but I love what I do, I know I can always find employment, and I've had great flexibility. Not to mention I had some really cool and unique job with this degree as well.

mello
04-29-2006, 12:48 AM
Don't forget the most underpaid and overworked of them all- Stay At Home Moms!

:thumbsup2

fac
04-29-2006, 01:07 AM
No plan to start a working mom vs stay-at-home mom debate.

But over lunch today, I discussed with DH on becoming a stay-at-home mom, because I have overworked by being working outside of home and be a mom. Therefore, by being stay-at-home full time, I think I will not be as overwork as I am now.

fac
04-29-2006, 01:43 AM
BTW, do I think teachers could be paid more? Sure.

ITA. IF the teachers were doing a good job. Sometimes it is sad to read people getting nto teaching *just* to get a stable job, the vacation and forgot that they have the ability to influence the lives of many children.

DD5 studies in a private full day kindergarten. In the beginning of the semester DH responsibile for her homework and would always tell me there was nothing. I checked her backpack and did not see any correspondence from the teacher. In November, I met with her teacher and brought up my concern. The teacher told me, the students are supposed to read some of the words everyday, I explained to her, I have never seen the correspondence from her about the need to read the high frequency words, she told me the stundents are supposed to know because she told them I was speechless.

kydisneyfans
04-29-2006, 06:21 AM
I personally only know one person with a degree that earns more than 50K per year. My standard salary is 35K plus incentive--the biggest perk right now is gas allowance. It's nice to run a small car, get reimbursed for driving it, and have enough left over to fill the tank of the Saturn Vue times a month. Free DSL at home is good too.

Again-50K in the big cities is chump change, 50K a year here gives you the ability to afford a 3000 sq ft home and a real nice living.

HayGan
04-29-2006, 08:20 AM
I have a BSBA and a certificate in International Business. When I was a senior in college I took an intern position with a company which after graduation hired me for a full time position at the whopping salary of $14,500 (this was in 1994) I worked there for 5 years and left for a job paying $30k (I was only making $25k when I left.) I'm still with the second job (which is really a career) and I have almost tripled my salary in almost 8 years. I have a great career that I love and gives me a great balance between career and family. I wouldn't have it at all if it wasn't for that degree or that low starting salary. Every penny that I have paid in tuition (and student loan interest) has been well worth it! :thumbsup2

I went to a fairly expensive university and I was shocked by the number of people there studying to be teachers. I couldn't imagine why anyone would pay $20k plus a year to earn a minimal salary especially when there are a number of great state schools in PA with great reputations in education for less than $10k a year. :sad2:

No comment on the SAHM vs. WM debate as I have all the responsibilities of a SAHM and I contribute a vast majority of my family's income (so you could probably guess where I stand on the debate ;) )

MrsPete
04-29-2006, 09:24 AM
Life is never fair as I used to tell my kids. I got to wash dishes and they got to eat. LOL !! University is different, they emphasize on research. A faculty member got tenured by publishing papers. Some people, after they got tenured, only work two days a week drawing a full salary. I had seen a professor using the same multiple choice exam paper every year. It is not uncommon for students to be taught by TAs, whom are Ph.D and master students and have a very busy workload themselves. Apparently, the better students can learn by themselves, in particular, when they are in college.You teach elementary school because you like children.
You teach high school because you like the subject.
You teach college because you want the opportunity for research.

MrsPete
04-29-2006, 09:34 AM
While it truly is sad to see so many college educated people earning less than 50K/year, I don't think the reverse is also true. How many millionaires do you think don't have college educations? I know more than a few millionaires (think the millionaire next door, not Paris Hilton) and all of them went to college. I just don't want high schoolers reading this thread to think they have the same chance of making it as a person who is college educated. Without an education, it's a greater uphill battle.
I think there are just enough "accidental millionaires" out there to make some people say, "But a degree isn't all it's cracked up to be." You know what I mean by accidental -- people who didn't get an education and fell into a great idea that (with work) grew into a business, or sports stars, or whatever. I'll even throw out an example: a business friend of my husband's invented a product; actually, he didn't invent it, he just put two items together in a unique way that was genius. He produced the product for a while himself, then he sold the idea for $$$$ (and retired) when he realized he didn't have the resources to make it grow. I guarantee you've seen his product! However, that's an ACCIDENT. He made waaay more money off his one idea than he ever earned in all his years as an engineer.

But the truth is that these people are one in a million. It's not something you and I can count upon!

Another thing to consider is the age of the "accidental millionaire". I think a generation ago it was easier to make it without a degree. I have a good friend who's in business administration. She works very hard in a high-profile business, she has job security and a pension, and she earns a very good salary -- all this despite the fact she didn't finish college. However, she will be the first to admit that she was "in the right place at the right time" and she fell into a lucky starter job. She excelled there and was promoted from within the company. She also says that this type of luck would be entirely impossible for our daughters; a person in their generation would never be allowed to get her foot in the door towards her job without the degree.

Thus, what worked for grandpa (or even for those of us who're 40ish) isn't going to work for our children. They need the degrees more than we did.

MrsPete
04-29-2006, 09:39 AM
i think it's hard for kids to grasp the idea of what a good wage is. i made $6.50 an hour in high school at a local record store. if you told me at 16 that i'd be making twice that in 7 years, i would have been very impressed :cool2: it wasn't until i was already living and working on my own in my early 20's that i started to 'get' what it's REALLY like to be a grown-up and what kind of money is needed to get by in the city i live in.This is why I'm not thrilled with the idea of my girls having jobs as teens. In my very touristy area, it's easy for a teen to get a job at the mall, etc. that pays $10 an hour, and all that pocket money gives teens the idea that earning a living is an easy thing. $10 an hour is a lot of money when you still live with mom and dad, and they pay all your real expenses.

I think it's setting kids up for unrealistic expectations.