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CamAnd
04-18-2006, 02:05 PM
Help! I would like to have my first yard sale to declutter our overflowing closets.
What's your best tips for a successful yard sale? I will be selling mostly baby equipment & children's clothes (brand names, Gymboree, & Baby Gap)-What are these selling for at yard sales? My kids clothes are almost like new. What are other items that sell?

TIA

java
04-18-2006, 02:31 PM
Forget the clothes. They don't sell well. No matter what brands they have people are looking for bargains. I had Hanna Andersson, Mini Boden, Gap, Polo... and people wanted it for dirt cheap. I think you might do better with say a bag of a size for a certain amount*but I am telling you children's clothes are a low priced item.
The baby gear though is a totally different story. People love that stuff and be sure to advertize that you have it at the sale. Remember it is a garage sale... so you won't really get what it is worth but you will get rid of it. For example we sold a simple pack and play for $25, one woman grabbed a ton of little tykes and fisher price big items*like ride ons, little slide ect.. for $150. People want to feel like they are getting a great deal.
Do you have any consignment shops in your area? Or baby resale stores? You might do better with the clothes there.
The only advice I can give you is that people will bargain on a 10 cent item trying to get it for 5 cents. Two for ones...ect. But we were moving and I wanted to get rid of it all. We made almost $2000. But we were selling things like bikes, a fridge, I think the clothes in total brought in only about $10(I gave the rest of it to a neighbor) I had a Coach bag that I selling for $15(it was in great shape- all leather) They wanted for the $15. That is where I drew the line. I said thanks but no thanks. That I would rather give away than sell to someone for so little.
Good luck on your sale
make sure your stuff is clean and organized so people can see it.

ToyStory#1fan'sMom
04-18-2006, 02:38 PM
I have had 3 yard sales and have made $650-$950 at all three. My hint is STAGING!! I don't just throw things on a table or leave in a box for people to dig through. That looks like junk even when it's not. Arrange your kid's clothes in outfits, hang them on hangers together (with the bottoms pinned so that it looks like the outfit would on) add a hair item to the top of the hanger, or sock pinned at the bottom. Make sure it looks like it would when their child wears it. I've sold sets of dishes by "setting the table" and adding a Mason jar full of flowers from the yard. Just where it looks nice. We arrange books, CDs, videos, etc in alphabetical order and stand them up where they are easy to look through. Any toys, we clean to where they look brand new (Magic Eraser is a great thing!). My last tip, go buy a box of doughnuts and bottles of water. Sell them 2/$1. This makes us a ton of money and ds loves being in charge of that "booth"

It does take a lot of time for one of our garage sales, but it's worth it. One more tip, we make "rooms". Each area is stuff that would go in a common place. Like all children's clothes and toys in a common area, all kitchen stuff together, etc. Anything nice, like furniture, put close to the road. People can't steal big stuff (as easily) and it will entice them to stop.

Have fun!
Kate

ImarriedGrumpy
04-18-2006, 03:22 PM
I totally agree with the staging advice. Borrow or rent tables - don't just pile things on a tarp on the lawn. Hang a rope or a rod up and hang clothing sorted by gender and size. If you need to stack things on tables, organize it neatly and go back through frequently to clean up again. We try to stage the nicest items on the curb where people will see them as they do a "drive by" to scope out the sale and decide if they are going to stop or keep going.

The hard-core bargain hunters will arrive much earlier than your advertised start time, so be prepared. We advertised an 8:00 am start time, and had people there poking through boxes as we were setting up at 6:00 am! And yes, people will try to haggle over prices, so be prepared to negotiate prices. We always say that everything is half-price after noon, and a paper bag filled with books, CD's, Videos, and/or clothing goes for $2.

Don't forget good advertising. Get an ad in the paper and specify baby items - that draws lots of people. Other "pulls" are furniture, antiques, collectables, and sporting goods. We do a lot of "book lovers'" sales because that's usually what we're trying to pare down, and when we advertise this way we get a completely different crowd from when we advertise "general housewares, women's clothing, books, collectables". We've had used book store owners show up for our "book lovers" sales to snap up the best books early. It's also important to have signs up on key corners and major streets in your neighborhood, and have the sale well marked in front of your house.

justplaingoofy
04-18-2006, 03:36 PM
Price everything, clean everything, and put it on tables.

Thats my 2 cents :Pinkbounc

Our 2 Princesses
04-18-2006, 04:15 PM
I have had several successful garage sales and am having another very soon. The one thing I have noticed - If you put a group of similar items in a Ziploc, they will sell. For example, I put groups of socks in a Ziploc and price them as a set. I also bag onesies, rec blankets, similar books, etc.
One other tip that customers love... I always put the sizes of clothing I am selling right on the tag. Then they don't have to search for the size. I also put folded clothing on the tables according to size.
Have a great garage sale! You'll be surprised at how much money you'll make! :)

englishteacha
04-18-2006, 04:35 PM
I agree with all of the above, plus am emphasizing that clean things sell well and for the best prices. Wash all the clothes if they are dingy or have that "stored away" smell, dust off furniture, make sure everything is as clean as it can be.

I also second pricing things. We did a joint yard sale with my SIL. Our stuff was priced, there's wasn't. We sold more! Even the hagglers want a starting point.

ImarriedGrumpy
04-18-2006, 04:49 PM
One other thing regarding pricing:

We buy those little colored dot stickers and designate each color to be a different price - Red is .50, Green is $1, Orange is $2.50, Yellow is $5, Blue is $10, and we use white for anything with a different price and write the price on the sticker. We then make a few posters with the pricing and colors and place them around the yard.

If you are combining your sale with someone else, then put your initials on your stickers and keep a piece of paper that you just peel off the sticker when you sell an item and stick it on the paper. At the end of the day you can add up what you earned from the stickers with your initials on them. Be sure to note if you bargained with someone and sold something for less than the sticker price.

Oh, and we use a muffin tin and a baking pan for our money drawer - we use the muffin tin to sort out the coins and the baking pan for the bills and checks. The muffin tin sits on top of the baking pan to help weigh down the paper money. Don't forget to go to the bank the day before and get plenty of singles, quarters, dimes and nickles for change. We usually get about $30 in one dollar bills, $20 in quarters, and $5 each in dimes and nickles, and that usually keeps us going. A couple times we've had to send someone racing to the bank to get some extra cash, but most of the time we can ask people to pay with smaller bills or coins if we're running out.

babiesX2
04-18-2006, 05:14 PM
I have had several successful garage sales and am having another very soon. The one thing I have noticed - If you put a group of similar items in a Ziploc, they will sell. For example, I put groups of socks in a Ziploc and price them as a set.

I did this at my sale, too! It worked out very well, and all the ziplocked items sold quickly.

I had a sale a few weekends ago. We made about $530. I agree with grouping similar items, having things clean, put things on tables, etc. I found it easier to price items in 25 cent increments. This method of pricing eliminates the need for dimes and nickels. It truly is much easier when you have more than one person standing there wanting to pay. You can do the math easier in your head, and it is less confusing to give change. True, some folks are going to pay you with dimes and nickels sometimes, but don't start out by getting rolls of smaller coins from the bank.

On the matter of children's clothes, I was very surprised to realize that they don't sell well. Next go round I will do the "Fill A Bag" for $5. I can't say that my hanging stuff was priced too high because the majority of people just passed up the hanging rack and went straight for the clothes folded up on the tables. We are selling them now in lots on eBay.

Good luck and give us an update!

welovedis
04-18-2006, 05:29 PM
While you don't say how big the clothing is, have you looked at completed auctions on eBay to see if you'd be better off listing there than selling at garage sale prices? Gymboree and Baby Gap do anywhere from OK to Really Good on eBay, esp if you have lots of pieces that are like new condition and matching "lines". Accessories from those places also help to bring auction prices up.

If you set on selling them at a garage sale, the posters here gave you some really good ideas, try to hand and outfit as much as possible. If you place an ad mention the brands of clothing (like Baby Gap Gymboree and any boutique brands if you have them) and also a size range if you can.

Definitely stage the area as best you can and you'll be surprised at the results. If everything is clean & set-up well it can make a difference is price. Also make sure you price everything because many people (including myself) will walk away if there aren't prices.

If you have McDonalds type toys that you don't want, but them in a box marked free (1 per child) or something like that. The kids can have fun finding their free toy while parents look over your stuff and they can take something away too.

GL!

welovedis
04-18-2006, 05:30 PM
One more thing on the clothes---if they are in good shape without holes, rips or stains and you don't want to eBay them you might look into a consignment shop in your area.

jonestavern
04-18-2006, 05:57 PM
All the above are excellent ideas.
Do try to get your neighbors involved having their yardsales

SIGNAGE
do we notice this just because the family has 3 generations of signmakers in it? :goodvibes

Placing of you actual signs is very important.
Make sure they are water & windproof &, for the love of all that's sacred, able to be read by cars passing at 35 (or more) MPH.
Drive to your house, notice with new eyes, all the roads that your buyers will be driving down.

All the info that's needed on your signs is something like:

Garage (or Multi Family) Yard Sale
Sat/Sun 8 am - 2 pm
277 WDW Drive
Rain or Shine

don't forget the big direction arrows!
Print out something on your computer then go to the print shop & have them whip up a few large signs on neon color paper or ask their opinion of your layout. You can get plastic coated, sandwiched poster board at Michael's. Use pre-printed vinyl letters--or if you have excellent handwriting--for your main signs--do a layout utilizing rulers or snap a chalk line etc. You just want the signs legible

Remember it may not be confusing to you where you live but it may be foreign country to others--keep the arrows--balloons if need extra punch--coming!

Should you live a looong way down a country road, for Pete's sake, your follow signs should say, as an example: " 4.7 mi further"

so:
Pricing
Staging & Display
Cleaning
Newsprint/bulletin board advertisement
Proper signage & placement
Try to get neighbor yardsale going
Grab bags--grouping of multiple, low-end items
Refreshments
Lots of change & a method of organizing it
Bags--used grocery bags

Anyone else?

check out Ebay/consignment shop to see if your good items might be worth it to sell off that way

In my ads, I like to put in the line "Early Birds Will Be Shot" :teeth:
I don't mind it they come at 7:30 for an 8 am sale--but as OP said they will show up at 6 am! :p
But of course, a sale is a sale--Good Luck!

Jean

jjan
04-18-2006, 07:57 PM
In my ads, I like to put in the line "Early Birds Will Be Shot" :teeth:
I don't mind it they come at 7:30 for an 8 am sale--but as OP said they will show up at 6 am! :p
But of course, a sale is a sale--Good Luck!

Jean

I love that! I have seen quite a few ads that say "Early birds welcome, but will pay double". I think that that is fair.

My biggest advice is decide which is the most important... make lots of money or get rid of stuff and then keep reminding yourself of that all day long if it is to get rid of stuff. It is always sad to go to a bunch of yard sales and see someone priced so high that nothing sells and they wonder why.

Also, make sure that you put your money in a fanny pack or something and not leave it lying around.... people will steal it. Also, make sure to keep your house locked... I have heard of people going in and helping themselves to the yard sale money sitting on the kitchen table while you are busy with the throngs of people.

We also never price something less than .25 cents. If it isn't worth .25 cents then throw it in the free pile... people will buy more stuff if they have already felt like they got a deal and who wants to deal with nickels and dimes etc.

Good luck! :)

daisyduck123
04-18-2006, 08:20 PM
I'M A YARD SALE PRO - - MY MOTHER & I MADE $825.00 AT OUR SALE LAST SPRING!!

Haven't read all of the posts, but did see that someone said "Forget the clothes". Well, you can't --you want to get rid of them.

Sell them together --like one bag/pile marked "Shirts -- $5.00 for all".

START EARLY--be out there by 6:30 a.m. setting up your stuff.

Go thru the entire house -- my biggest problem --a week after our yard sale I always find more stuff to sell.

ADVERTISE ON ALL POPULATED STREET CORNERS.
ADVERTISE IN YOUR LOCAL PAPER --list everything you're selling --our ad always states "HH (means household items), toys, electronics, tools, books, clothes, jewelry".

USE NEON POSTERBOARD FOR YOUR SIGNS- -We get ours at Michael's. Put them up the Friday afternoon before your sale, so that people driving home from work Friday afternoon can see your signs.

We usually put out about a dozen signs. Make sure, after your sale, that you go take your signs down (I hate it when I drive thru town & see a yard sale sign from 2 months ago.)

My kids always have a cooler full of cold, canned sodas...50 cents each.

Have lots of change on hand.

GOOD LUCK!!

jacksmom
04-18-2006, 08:37 PM
We are planning a sale in May (any suggestions on best weekend?)! :rotfl2: And I was wondering if baked goods (muffins, brownies, cookies) would sell? We are planning on water bottles and soda (will set up a table by itself for my ds to be in charge of selling consumables)! :rotfl: We are trying to fund another trip! :lmao: And want to boost sales as much as possible! :cheer2:

daisyduck123
04-18-2006, 08:43 PM
We are planning a sale in May (any suggestions on best weekend?)! :rotfl2: And I was wondering if baked goods (muffins, brownies, cookies) would sell? We are planning on water bottles and soda (will set up a table by itself for my ds to be in charge of selling consumables)! :rotfl: We are trying to fund another trip! :lmao: And want to boost sales as much as possible! :cheer2:


I've never bought any cookies, muffins, or brownies at yard sales (or sold any of those items) because I don't know what the kitchen conditions of the sellers are (I'm just funny about stuff like that, I don't even eat the baked goods my students bring me unless the mom is a friend of mine). You just never know if people have cat hair floating around their kitchen, doggy drool on the counter,...things like that.

Many times, I've seen people selling donuts straight out of a DUNKIN DONUTS box --now I have bought these sometimes. You may want to think about that.

kmccain
04-18-2006, 08:56 PM
I don't know why the clothes don't always go but they are hard to get rid of. When I yard sale, I am looking for clothes for my kids!

I used boxes and sorted the clothes by sizes in the boxes. Nothing over a quarter and if it has a stain, put it in the free box.

Advertise free stuff and have a nice big free box. As things slim down, throw more in the free box.

There are some really great ideas here for you! Neatness helps.

Make sure you price everything some way. Some people won’t ask you a price. I don't like colored sticker boards. I put up big signs making everything on a table one price.

I go to several yard sales in my area where the entire housing development gets together on the same day. They are yard sale heaven! You can hit hundred of them in a day! This might be a good idea for you if possible. You would get a very high volume of people.


Good Luck!

:tink:

jacksmom
04-18-2006, 08:59 PM
I've never bought any cookies, muffins, or brownies at yard sales (or sold any of those items) because I don't know what the kitchen conditions of the sellers are (I'm just funny about stuff like that, I don't even eat the baked goods my students bring me unless the mom is a friend of mine). You just never know if people have cat hair floating around their kitchen, doggy drool on the counter,...things like that.

Many times, I've seen people selling donuts straight out of a DUNKIN DONUTS box --now I have bought these sometimes. You may want to think about that.

Dunkin Donuts it is then! :rotfl: :Pinkbounc :banana:

ImarriedGrumpy
04-18-2006, 09:01 PM
I have bought baked goods at a garage sale - usually from some adorable child with pleading eyes seated at a table with a sign saying "help me go to Disney World!" :rotfl2: One of my good friends and garage-sale buddies says she has a rule to never pass by a child's lemonade stand without stopping to buy a glass of lemonade.

Another friend takes advantage of a neighborhood garage sale weekend and hauls out his grill to sell hot dogs, chips, bottled water, sodas, and cookies. He makes a fortune because everyone is wandering around the neighborhood browsing the 50 - 100 garage sales and he's the only place to get food without moving your car and losing your parking spot!

I'd say go for it - especially if you can plant a cute kid next to a sign saying "help me go to Disney World"...:earsboy:

ZanneMarie
04-18-2006, 09:11 PM
I have to say that kids clothing is a staple of my sales. My neighbor and I combine our sales so we have quite a variey of boys and girls and sizes. I do not price super cheap for my brand name clothing and still sell tons. I priced my boys size 8-10 jeans (Levis, Cherokee, and some Gap) for $3-4 and got rid of almost all of them. My little girls size clothing I sold for $2-4 for an outfit, a few really nice ones for even more and sold a lot of them. I think I price higher than I would be willing to pay in some cases but as it sells ....I continue pricing that way. I do take my leftover nice items to a consignment shop and the not so nice items to Goodwill.

marshallandcartersmo
04-18-2006, 09:17 PM
There are a lot of sales on both Friday AND Saturday in my area. Actually, when we've had yard sales we always have them on both days. If you can, have it both days----two times the chances to make more $$$$!

abcboys
04-18-2006, 10:15 PM
I love garage sailing. I don't have them a lot anymore since I find them more work and I don't have a lot to sell but I love to go to them and I will tell you what I like.

I'm surprised someone said clothing doesn't sell. I have 3 boys and most of their clothing is from garage sales. When I've had yard sales, clothing is usually mostly of what I sell. You don't have to price super cheap (25) but don't price high either (10.00) If you have good quality gap, gymboree stuff I would pay a couple of dollars for nice outfits or jeans. Some yard sales I go to people price jeans at 10.00 and they sit there all day.

Like others have said make sure it is organized. I hate looking at clothing at toys thrown on tarps on the ground.

If you have small free toys that will make little kids happy while mommy or daddy shops.

Don't follow the person around asking what size they are looking for and then proceed to show them every outfit in that size. Just leave them alone unless they ask.

Yes, some people will try to haggle. Unless they are trying to get a 5.00 for .10 it's nice to give them a bargain. Sometimes if I'm buying 3 things at 2.00 I might ask if they will take 5.00 for all of it.

Say 1/2 price after 12:00 when the sales will be winding down.

Go ahead and start your sale early. True garage salers do not wait until 8:00 to get started.

CamAnd
04-18-2006, 10:53 PM
Thanks for all the helpful advice!!!! These forums are awesome. What's your opinion of yard sales over holiday weekends? I'm thinking Memorial weekend Friday/Saturday. Good or bad idea? As far as advertising, we do have a local circular that reaches a good size radius. Is it best to advertise 2 consecutive weeks before, or just the week of the sale?

daisyduck123
04-18-2006, 11:17 PM
Thanks for all the helpful advice!!!! These forums are awesome. What's your opinion of yard sales over holiday weekends? I'm thinking Memorial weekend Friday/Saturday. Good or bad idea? As far as advertising, we do have a local circular that reaches a good size radius. Is it best to advertise 2 consecutive weeks before, or just the week of the sale?


Well, I think more people tend to NOT have yard sales over holiday weekends -- so if you have one, there won't be as many as usual on your day. But then, I'm not sure if all the "regulars" are around to go on those weekends.

**ONlY advertise the week of your sale. A couple of times my mom & I have shown up at a house, seen other yard sale shoppers standing in a driveway looking around at the empty driveway, & we all look at each other. THEN...someone will check the paper & notice that the date is for the following week...not a good thing...just make it for the week of your sale...that's what 99% of the people do around here anyway.

jonestavern
04-18-2006, 11:22 PM
In our neck of the woods holiday/long weekend sales are HUGE. :teeth:
So ask around your area~

Jean

Katie
04-19-2006, 12:22 AM
what a bunch of great ideas!!

Also, we had a garage sale two weekends ago, about 1,000---nothing big..mostly clothes( kids kids kids).

We also did about 180.00 in food. We put hotdogs in the roaster, bought bulk chips(individual), bagged cookies(storebought) and had drinks. We had a"value meal" which included hotdog,chips,cookies and drink for 3.50! Sold lots!! Plus we ala'carted everything else! We actually had people come just to eat!

I agree with haning up the good stuff! Easier to find. When you have a few spare minutes, take the hangers from the stuff you sold already and hang up the stuff laying on the table..it will go faster!

also, for some reason, people don't think ahead at garage sales. So winter stuff is not going to go in the spring and summer stuff, obviously is not going to go in the fall! I always donate everything I don't sell to Goodwill, but keep the "off season" better clothes and they always sell at the next season sale!

I sold all my kids(sigh) Disney videos (54 of them) for 2-3 dollars apiece. I sold about 30 hardback books from my book club for 3.00 apiece.

Good Luck!

jeancbpugh
04-19-2006, 07:36 AM
Group themed things together.

For example, I took a box and put in a bunch of Toy Store things: a video, a t-shirt, a Woody Doll, some Toy Store McDonalds toys, a Toy Store wall paper border. I got $40 for it. A bunch of the stuff in the box had little or no value if sold individually, but they helped the group sell.

LynnTH
04-19-2006, 11:57 AM
I too am a garage sale "Pro". My mom and I have one every year. Anyone in the family who wants to put items in the garage sale is more than welcome. The more the merrier. We usually end up with about 10 families in our garage alone and then my moms neighbors have theirs on the same day. We get a lot of people to our sales. I like having them with others as the garage is then so full more people will stop. ( I know if I drive by a garage sale and only see a few little tables I don't even bother).

As one poster said - signage is critical. We always get large neon poster board and make BIG signs with arrows. You do need to be able to follow the signs and to see the writing when driving by. Some people don't look in the paper for sales they just follow signs (like me). We do however, put an ad in 2 local papers. Our sales are always held Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Thursdays are big garage sale days here and are usually our biggest day.

I may be in the minority here also but kids clothes in our area sell extremely well. I have sold the gymboree outfits for about $5 or so. The brand names sell well as do the Target stuff (just priced lower). I once took in a bunch of clothes to a consignment store and they were going to give me $70 for everything. I told them no and sold them in the garage sale and made about $350 for the same clothes. We usually average about $1500 - $2000 per sales with most of the money going to me( usually about $700). Kids items and toys also do really well and surprisingly mens things. We get a lot of guys looking for tools and stuff.

Have fun.

DaBoo
04-19-2006, 12:10 PM
I agree with lots of signs that are clear in BIG black letters. Its hard to read a bunch of small letters while driving. Keep them simple.

YARD SALE TODAY
7-1
123 JANE DRIVE
(with a big arrow to point the way)

I love to yard sale but nothing worse than driving around looking for it. Especially now with the price of gas.

Hope you do great. Tammie :disrocks:

Breakfast@Tiffany's
04-19-2006, 01:01 PM
I think I saw this tip here - to make a clothes rack, use 2 step ladders and put a wooden dowel (or a shower rod or even a broom handle) in the middle. You can then display shoes or something on the steps of the ladders. I usually bring out a small bookshelf to display books and movies, it makes it so much easier for people to look than bending over a jumble in a box. Just make sure to mark the shelf with a "Not for sale" sign. If you have electronics, have an extension cord ready (strung from your house or garage) so that shoppers can test items.

Clothing prices can be tricky, it depends on your area, obviously. I sold separates at $1 and outfits at $2-$4. If clothing is stained, more than likely you won't be able to get much for it, a quarter at the most. Mark the size on the price tag, it makes it so much easier for shoppers, as well as yourself as you tidy up between busy times.

Epscot
04-19-2006, 01:46 PM
My wife is a Garage Sale Queen. She has at least one (usually two, spring and fall) every year for the last 10 years. The main problem she sees when she allows her friends to bring "a few things" over to add to her sale is that people tend to overprice their merchandise. I guess it is human nature to think that your things are worth more than they really are. Put yourself in the buyer's shoes and imagine what you would pay for some item from a total stranger, especially if it is used.

Also, adult sized clothes don't sell well around here. My wife generally wears a ladies S or M and hardly any of her clothes sell. I wear a men's L or XL and sell a few more, but not many. Most of her customers tend to be looking for larger sizes.

Finally, realize that some (many?) shoppers believe that a garage sale is the last step before donating or throwing items away, so they try to haggle accordingly. This is not the case for my wife, as she will box most things that don't sell and store them in the attic until the next sale. After 3 attempts, she will donate unsold things. We won't try to sell things that we are going to throw in the trash.

Good Luck!

Rebeccapaige!
04-19-2006, 02:18 PM
I definately agree on the kids clothes, the area really determines what people will pay. Where I used to live I could price a gymboree OUTFIT, up to $7. By my mom's house I can't seem to get over $5. I normally price clothes at 90% off. so a $50 outfit new I price at $5. but i've seen people price gymboree at $15 an outfit and still sell it. I usually price what I would like to pay at a garage sale. There will always be people who say that's too high etc, but they aren't the one who paid $50 for it! I sold $700 at my last garage sale and i'd $500 of it was kids clothes. Non namebrand clothes I price much cheaper and stuff like gap jeans etc, price at $2-$2.50. The only one i seem to be able to get the better prices for are a whole gymboree outfit. BUT I must say I do some research and do sell what sells really well on ebay first. If an outfit only goes for $8 on ebay then I just garage sale it, not worth the gas and time. It has to be an outfit that makes a ton of money for me to want to spend the time ebaying it. I also agree clothes sell mostly in season. I still put out the winter stuff in the spring though, because some people will buy ahead if they are able to predict there childs size. PJ's I sell for .50-.75 cents. I also agree with the poster who said hang it all to look nice, I buy those little snack size baggies and put it around the top of the hanger, to fit matching socks and hair things in. I'm probably the oppossite type of rummage saler, I will only buy like new gymboree, and I won't spend more than $10 on an outfit normally. If someone appreciates the price you pay they will pay a little more, but it is a garage sale so be fair too. I have never done well selling soda etc, at a garage sale. But baked goods went well with the little old ladies:-)
Becky

lindakmonty
04-19-2006, 02:59 PM
Garage sales are definately a lot of work if you want to have a successful one... I had my first one last year, but I sold over 2k and most of it was clothes!! It was all name brand excellent condition ...many still had the tags on them...but I cleared out a lot of stuff fast! :) We're going to have another this year. 2k.... that is a decent Disney trip but it can make you crazy :crazy: plan ahead, put an add in the paper and put up clear signs. Good luck. With whatever is left at the end...I just take it to Goodwill.

ImarriedGrumpy
04-19-2006, 03:10 PM
One other note about signs - is there a common color used for garage sales in your area? In one city I lived in, when you put an ad in the paper they would send you these bright pink 8 1/2 x 11 paper signs to advertise your sale in your neighborhood. So every weekend, we would drive around looking for the bright pink signs to find garage sales. When I had a garage sale, I always used bright pink posterboard to make the signs.

Here, there isn't any standard or common color for signs, but there are many "community wide rummage sale" days. Many of the cities will have dates when people can sign up to be part of the community sale weekend, and then they get signs and get their house on a map that is distributed to the people coming for the sale. They also get free advertising in the listings of the community sale. Check out your county or city website to see if/when these dates might be in your area. Even if you don't get on board with them, at least have your sale on the same day. Likewise, if you live several miles in the opposite direction of a community doing a sale, don't schedule yours on the same day as theirs - the hard core garage salers will be over at the community wide sale. (we made this mistake once! We had tons of great furniture and stuff because both my roommate and I were getting married and moving from WI to CA, but we picked the same weekend as a community garage sale in a town 10 miles away. We only made $300 and had to take 75% of the stuff to Goodwill...)

My2Cinderellas
04-19-2006, 03:12 PM
I just held a successful garage sale iwth a friend. We do one every spring, and sometimes in the fall as well. Kids clothes are the bulk of our sales. Between us we have 5 overdressed kids.

After reading these boards and talking with friends around the country, garage sales and prices are definitely regional. In one part of the country nothing priced over $1 will sell regardless of brand or condition. I'm luckier, here kids clothes sell well and you can get more for things if they are in good condition. The nicest stuff I do ebay, but the rest goes in the garage sale. Prices are $4-5 for a nice outfit/dress, $3 cheaper dress/outfit in great condition or Gymboree with wear, $2 play dress, $2-3 jeans in great condition, $1 with stains/holes in the knees, $2-3 for pajama sets, $2 name brand shirt, $1 other nice shirts/shorts, $.50 target tee shirts. Shoes are hit or miss, and will only sell for us if marked cheap cheap cheap.

Hang the clothes up!!!! It's all about presentation and if it's easy for the buyer to go through. We use metal plumbing pipe (1" diameter 10 foot poles) duct taped to step ladders. the only clothing on tables were onsies and things that were in poor condition for a quarter.

by having 2 families (and a few more things that friends bring over) we have a lot of stuff out. I hate going to a sale that is 5 outfits hanging up and a card table with tacky 20-year old home decorations.

save plastic sacks from walmart/grocery store, people appreciate getting their things in a bag.

place a good sized ad in the paper - list lots of keywords that are big draws. we don't just say name brands, we spend the extra to say Gymboree, Gap, Polo, Oshkosh. list the baby equipment by name as well. Make it look like it's really worth their time to come to your sale.

good luck to you!!

Bunchkin
05-03-2006, 11:20 AM
We had our 1st garage sale last August and did almost $700 is sales!! :cool1:

Kids clothes sold great for us!! We are in a new subdivision and had lots of customers and even neighbors! Our kids have name brand clothes and we priced them similar to prices already listed here. DD does have some special boutique dresses that were hung up and special priced.

Other things that sold well for us:
Tools, children's book, coloring books, party supplies, ziploc bag full of balloons, backpacks/diaper bags/purses, gift bags (one woman bought my entire collection, I never throw a gift bag out from any occasion and decided to finally get rid of most of them), stuffed animals priced at $1, jumbo Winnie the Pooh stuffed set of friends sold for $40, house hold odds and ends.

In my newspaper add I listed the general stuff, but also threw in some eye catching things to draw attention. Like American Girl. I sold a couple outfits, doll and girl sized. This drew people from as far away as a 2 hour drive!!!!
I'll being selling AG again this year. Along with my DD's Build a Bears, Playmobile Pirate sets and will add these to the key words to my add again.
Also selling a bunch of Disney stuff!!!

We bought cookies from Sam's and water bottles too and pop. Left the cookies in the container it comes in so people could see they were store bought and not home made, just in case anyone would worry. WE sold a ton.
This year DH wants to bring around the grill to the driveway and do the hot dog thing!!! :teeth: Since we have a ton of construciton going down our street we will probably get construction workers stopping again this year, not only to buy stuff but probably for the hot dogs too!!! :thumbsup2

Display is really key!!! I have 2 huge white boards in my basement, I put one outside and advertised on it for all to see!!! It caught a lot of people's attention!!! :rotfl2: :thumbsup2
Big, clear signs are a must too!!!

jeankeri
05-03-2006, 11:33 AM
Bunchkin- question about the Playmobil sets (we also have many of there)- How much would you be selling these for? We have sets like police station, farm, etc. If I were to group them in the oversized zip-lock bags, what should I charge? I was going to try to e-bay them, but of course our garage sale is coming up next week and I never got around to it :rolleyes: . We do the sales every year, so I'm not adverse to setting a firm/fair price and packing them back up when the sale is over. Thanks for any answer.

summerrluvv
05-03-2006, 12:46 PM
My only advice, and the most important IMO, is to put PRICE TAGS on the stuff!! I can't tell you how many garage sales I go to that have no price tags! I don't like to ask how much something is, so I'll usually just leave. Good luck :)

left210
05-03-2006, 01:07 PM
I have yard sales and go to them just about every weekend. From my experience, people do not like the colored sticker pricing method. pink - .25, yellow .50, etc. because they are always saying now what was pink, etc. I recommend pricing each sticker and as already said make sure you price everything. People dont like to ask on every single item what the price is. Clothes sell really well for a good price where I am too.

pjlla
05-03-2006, 06:56 PM
Anyone ever tried this??? I have a couple of pieces of NIB Princess House crystal and I was unsure of how to price them. So I checked Ebay. I printed the first page of a completed auction and will be attaching it to the item I am yard saling. I figure I will price my item a few dollars cheaper than what the auction went for. That plus the fact that there is no shipping should convince people that they are getting a deal, right?? Ever tried this? (And yes, I know I should Ebay them.... but I find Ebay to be waaay to labor intensive... plus I would be hesitant to ship something so fragile.)....................P

mantysk8coach
05-03-2006, 10:23 PM
My biggest tip? Start getting ready early. For some reason, I decided to have a rummage sale on my maternity leave in 2004, three weeks after my DD was born. Bad idea. I have no idea what I was thinking. My mom was a huge help, but I was out in my garage in tears until like 1 in the morning the night before my sale started.

So this year, as soon as I picked the date I started gradually going through the house, gathering, pricing, and hauling to the garage. My sale isn't until May 18, 19, 20, but it is a lot more work that you may think. I'd much rather take my time and make it look nice than have to really rush around the week of.

39CINDERELLA
05-04-2006, 08:16 AM
what happens if we don't want to take checks? only cash.
has anyone else done this? princess:

kilee
05-04-2006, 08:34 AM
I got about 1/2 way through the thread. I am a garage sale queen. Got to them Thurs-Sat (which is the popular days around here). I have 39 + 4 "rummage" sales this weeekend-- I am very excited. That being said I am not a junk collector, nor the person that will ask you to take less (I don't have the nerve), and I'm looking for specific things. That being said...

My sister, mother, and I also hold a massive sale once a year. Every year I'm suprised at the stuff I still have to get rid of. We always have less than 10% of the items we start with left. That includes the mountains of clothing. Funny thing. My sister and I are of the mindset--- we want it gone. So, we set up 2 clothing methods. 1 is a table--- all items are $0.25. Then a garment rack for anything we want to charge more for. Those will be individually priced. Her and I almost always only have a few items each for the rack. Mom on the other hand always has dozens because her stuff is "too good" for the rack (funny sis buys almost all Gap and Gymboree for the kids and American Eagle for her and DH-- My son wears Pac Sun, Hurley, Hollister, that sort of stuff, and my clothing is all Fashion Bug or Lane Bryant so I don't think mom's Karen Scott or Alfred Dunner is any better). Anyhow, she prices in the $2-6 range per item. Can I tell you she's lucky to sell 1 or 2 things. She almost always has to lug all the clothing back. It's because clothing is going to be the biggest hit or miss item. If you want more then invest the time in ebay. Otherwise it needs to just go cheap if you really want it gone. Brand doesn't make a difference. I can go to the Goodwill or other thrift stores and get the namebrands for $1-2 around here.

Now, that being said the fill a bag is a good idea. DEPENDING on what type of bag and price you'll have. We seen a lot of the fill my tiny plastic grocery bag for $5-8 this last weekend. Only problems them rummage sales I mentioned--- well they do the fill a bag for $1 or $2 and they're always generous sized bags. So, you still need to be competitive to a certain degree. Maybe fill a bag for $3 if it's small. If they are nice sized then go the $5.00.

When pricing decide if you really want it gone then mark it. If it's cheap and a bargain then you'll sell it which really will result in more money in the end. Also, it will mean less clean up work because now you don't have to decide what to do w/ the 200 items you have left that didn't sell.

Just my opinion and observation from what I've seen. I see so many sales w/ individual clothing marked at $3-10 a piece people look and walk immediately away when they see the prices.

kilee
05-04-2006, 08:37 AM
The other thing garage sales usually shouldn't be competitive w/ ebay. Remember ebay will always catch double if not 5times what a garage sale will. A lot of people at your sale will probably be looking for resale items. So, I don't know I'd be attaching stats from ebay to items.

emh1129
05-05-2006, 05:25 PM
Do all of you advertise your sale in the paper?
We didn't last time and still did quite well.. I'm wondering if we should have this time, though (our sale is tomorrow).

babiesX2
05-05-2006, 05:40 PM
Anyone ever tried this??? I have a couple of pieces of NIB Princess House crystal and I was unsure of how to price them. So I checked Ebay. I printed the first page of a completed auction and will be attaching it to the item I am yard saling. I figure I will price my item a few dollars cheaper than what the auction went for. That plus the fact that there is no shipping should convince people that they are getting a deal, right?? Ever tried this? (And yes, I know I should Ebay them.... but I find Ebay to be waaay to labor intensive... plus I would be hesitant to ship something so fragile.)....................P

I have seen other people do this. I even did it with something that someone tried to buy for nothing - an antique highchair that the previous owners of our house had left in the basement. They said they didn't want it. I looked it up on eBay and saw that they were going for upwards of $50. I priced mine at $35. An early morning dealer laughed and offered me $5 (with the attitude that he was doing me a favor by getting it out of my way). I went into the house and printed out the auctions. The next interested person didn't hesitate at my $35 price tag. She snatched it up and crammed it into her tiny sports car! :teeth:

But back on topic. I must be the most OCD garage saler around because I stressed so much over mine by having everything sparkling clean, neat , hung, pressed, priced, on a table, neatly arranged, etc. I went to one a few weeks ago that was supposed to have started at noon. I got there at around 2pm. They were just starting to put things out and nothing was priced. They didn't even have an idea of what they wanted to charge. I would ask a price and they would look at each other and "discuss" it. I finally quit asking them the price and started offering what I felt things were worth. They had a really nice tricycle that I wanted for my twins for Christmas so I offered them $5 and they accepted. It was annoying, but I'm no fool. I've heard alot of people say that they won't buy at sales like that, but I like the strategy that I adopted.

babiesX2
05-05-2006, 05:43 PM
what happens if we don't want to take checks? only cash.
has anyone else done this? princess:

I didn't take checks from people. My mom did and I she didn't get burned, but it wasn't something that I wanted to deal with.

babiesX2
05-05-2006, 05:52 PM
The other thing garage sales usually shouldn't be competitive w/ ebay. Remember ebay will always catch double if not 5times what a garage sale will. A lot of people at your sale will probably be looking for resale items. So, I don't know I'd be attaching stats from ebay to items.

My attitude is that if anyone is going to be making "big bucks" off my old stuff, it is going to be me! Dealers can go looking elsewhere for re-sale items. It won't hurt my feelings one little bit. What doesn't sell at my garage sale I then put on eBay or take to consignment. I'm going to price my items at what they are worth. It is my stuff and people can either pay my asking price or leave it where it is at.