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ohMom
04-05-2006, 12:15 PM
ok i'm just in from a walk during my recovery phase from the 1/2 marathon last saturday -- maybe i'm pumped i don't know

i've always called myself a 'powerwalker' you know more than leisure but not breaking any records. my pace saturday was a 14:15 min/mile and i was in awe of those in the walking division with a pace of 10 min/mile and even under that! that's faster than i jogged in my jogging days.

i'm wondering if i should consider retraining myself as a 'racewalker' - which is probably what WISHers call wogging? you think?

what are the benefits of racewalking vs powerwalking? better muscle definition? more calories burned? easier on the joints? anyone know? is the effort worth it?

Maherae
04-07-2006, 11:00 PM
Hi, ohmom :wave: I just wanted to say CONGRATULATIONS on completing your 1/2 marathon!! :cool1: :cool1: I am right there with you on the speed of some walkers!! You are doing great!! :thumbsup2

Over on the weekly thread, a wog is between a walk and a jog. Not fancy, but it gets ya there! Racewalking has a very specific form to be followed. If you register as a racewalker in some events, there will be separate judges along the course!! I'm sure if you post the question on that thread you will get your answer from those in the know.

As far as which way to train, I would think it has to do with what you are hoping to do during the events..win in an age group? get a personal best? Three months ago I never thought that I would see a 16 minute mile. Now, I'm moving in on a 15 min/mile!! Just unbelievable to a non runner/athlete like me. (Sunny would say that I AM an athlete now!) So, YOUR time is just awesome to me!! :cheer2: Anne

ohMom
04-09-2006, 09:57 PM
anne -- thanks for the kudos :)

you ARE most certainly an athlete! i just started reading John Bingham's Courage to Start and he talks about that -- accepting yourself as an athlete and not comparing yourself only to the elites. i see you completed the WDW 1/2 this year -- no way will i ever be ok with you saying you're NOT an athlete after that!! i see you're hooked too and we'll meet next Jan :wave:

anyhow -- i guess my goal is to be more effiicient in my efforts and tone my lower body. when i did run several years ago was when my lower body/thighs were really toned (for me) and i want that back! for me i think it's always striving to better myself and that keeps me motivated, make sense?

come to think of it -- i'm going to move this to the events/competition sub-board where i may get more input.

I got a couple books on "fast walking" from the library and one does detail the form of racewalking and exercises to achieve it -- reads like alot of thinking initally when retraining my legs for a different movement though

Maherae
04-09-2006, 11:13 PM
i see you completed the WDW 1/2 this year
Whoa!! :rotfl2: Not me!! My first half will be at DL in September!! I couldn't have kept up with the sweepers in January!! :lmao:

ohMom
04-10-2006, 08:50 AM
oops :) i misread your clippie, the center one but now i see that teeny tiny "disneyland" sorry!

Lisa loves Pooh
04-11-2006, 05:06 AM
Racewalking is tough and has a different set of rules.

My dad race walks--his full marathon time "walking" was the same as my half marathon run/walk. So it has it's advantages. (12:00 pacing)

The key form difference and teh necessity for judges---ONE foot must be on the ground at all times. If you look at running or jogging--you'll see that you have both feet in the air frequently.

Before progressing to speed walking (Akin to knocking 4 minutes off of a running pace or any other style pace)---I would concentrate on getting your foot strike to 70 steps per minute per foot (the going rate). As you concentrate on that--your body will naturally get faster. As your walking becomes faster--you will eventually be ready to become a racewalker.

But to be honest--at the present time---though you might concentrate on form--you probably won't see that much of an improvement in speed.

Much like someone who jogs and decides to run--for an endurance event...it would be a while before their times resemble that of a runner--while they learn the form and what not.

I hope this makes sense. As I am not trying to discourage you--simple encourage you to train yourself to walk faster before taking the big leap into the realm of racewalking.

And like running--racewalking is strenuous and you can get injured. My dad injured his ankle and had to drop an event. So excited to be back in the saddle--I think he bit off more than he can chew with his age----his first stint back was the Disney full---and he probably should have rested upa bit before assuming he could resume his old racewalking career in full swing.

ohMom
04-11-2006, 08:02 AM
lisa -- actually you didn't sound discouraging but real. i was hoping someone with a bit of background on racewalking would answer. i got a couple books and i'm trying to figure out the form :) i may try it on my own and if it feels good i'll searchfor a group or something nearby that i could meet up with to get the form down.

i'm not looking to be competitive really, i just wondered if there was where i may want to go to take it to the next level or not. actually i was thinking once i feel i have the form i would interval with my regular walking until i have the strength for it. i did try a little just by raising my toes at striking (i think that was what it's called) and not trying to have a huge stride; and that naturally sped me up

Lisa loves Pooh
04-11-2006, 01:56 PM
well--work on the pace as that helps improve form--then you can do things to give you more power.

My dad was a racewalking coach--I can send him your post to acquisition some tips for you.

Lisa loves Pooh
04-11-2006, 02:01 PM
i did try a little just by raising my toes at striking (i think that was what it's called) and not trying to have a huge stride; and that naturally sped me up

Not sure about raising the toes--but hte shortening of the stride will give you more foot strike---coutn and make sure it is no more than 70.

Less than 70 stride is too big--more than 70 stride is too short.

It will not happen overnight--if you are at 60..it could take a while to get to 70.

Remember--it is a goal to achieve. And once achieved--it may not be sustained for very long--but eventually...it will happen all the time.

Lisa loves Pooh
04-11-2006, 06:53 PM
From my dad:

Race Walking is a progression of steps so taken that the walker makes contact with the ground, so that no visible (to the human eye) loss of contact occurs. The advancing leg shall be straightened (i.e. not bent at the knee) from the moment of first contact with the ground until the vertical upright positionRace Walking is a progression of steps so taken that the walker makes contact with the ground, so that no visible (to the human eye) loss of contact occurs. The advancing leg shall be straightened (i.e. not bent at the knee) from the moment of first contact with the ground until the vertical upright position.



From: IAAF Rules governing racewalking .



In order to optimize motion the racewalker learns to focus the motion in the hips. Getting the sense of leading the leg forward with the hip prior to fully extending the leg is difficult to a new walker but leads to greatest efficiency. The arms should be bent at the elbow at about a 90 degree angle and should balance the motion of the opposing leg.



Racewalking, like power walking, does not in general stress the joints as much as running. Some people with problem knees are not able to fully extend the leg with comfort. Racewalking burns about 30 percent more calories per mile than running.



Competitive racewalkers develop a cadence of between 2 1/2 and 5 steps per second.



Working on basic technique is important and often requires the assistance of a coach. It's very difficult to evaluate our form ourselves. If you have access to a treadmill with a mirror you can do some of this.



I repeat the advice of a hip focus. It is not initially easy for most. One way I practice the hip motion is to stand in front of a mirror, swinging arms and hips while keeping the knees straight. Then with arms hanging at your side flex alternate knees to move your hips up and down. Your shoulders will be going up and down to balance this. Now, walk with the 90 degree arms swinging and focus on the motion of the hips. Keep practicing this until you feel the hip lead and do it more automatically.



When you are properly racewalking it might feel or appear that your torso is twisting like a dishrag.



If none of this makes sense, ask again and I'll try to explain it with some different images. Good luck!



Jim Wass

12:07 per mile racewalker 2006 Disney Marathon



If anything appears unclear to you please point it out to me and I'll work on it. I'm okay with this individual emailing me directly to discuss technique or for me to put her in touch with a possible coach in her area. I've done wonders with an 81 year old walker, we're getting him close to 11 minute mile pace for 3 km.



Dad

Oh Mom--if you are interested I can PM his e-mail address to you for more information. Whether you do it for leisure or sport.

Tiger Lily 03
04-15-2006, 11:31 AM
Lisa, that is an inspirational post for me from your Dad. Wow! for the 81 yo doing that pace. I wonder...

Lisa loves Pooh
04-16-2006, 07:19 AM
Lisa, that is an inspirational post for me from your Dad. Wow! for the 81 yo doing that pace. I wonder...

Yep--I was chatting with hubby about my dad saying he performs "miracles".

I'm still not asking for pregnancy racewalking tips from him though. :confused3

I suppose he could put on a fake belly or something. :rotfl2:

And I'll let him know you mentioned that--when I requested teh advice, he asked if it was from you.